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That's a tough one, but I will work on it. ... done well but he's too well-muscled for AKC, IME.

Thanks for that. I love the Greys I meet and I've noticed a huge variation in height more than anything else. When I get out of the game of agility, a Greyhound is likely.

Yeah, they're not the dog for agility, at least not if you want to win.
Mustang Sally
Where can I see pictures of Tasha?

[/nq]
Such pretty girl!
Mustang Sally
= 0dd1.jpg

Thanks! I did look. Tasha has nada Elkhound, except for the body colour of an older Elkhound.

That's what we thought. Her personality is definitely 100% Siberian. Melinda, do your dogs talk? You can actually carry on a conversation with Mukluk.
Mustang Sally
Image and Cinder's niece:

okay, she has got to be part hyena.

Wouldn't they just love her in the breed ring?

Mustang Sally
Melinda, do your dogs talk?

And then some. I just took them all down to the boarding kennel (I'm off to Minnesota tomorrow) and I suspect during the process of loading them all in the Behemoth I sustained ear damage.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

"(Social Security) will be bust in 10 years" George Bush, in 1978
I know of a few breeders who do field coursing and a couple who do live coursing with their dogs, but they're in the minority.

Do the conformation dogs retain the same chasing/hunting instinct as performance-bred sighthounds?
Who's Old Hemp?
An important early working Border Collie sire (1894) that most conformation breeders cite as THE key sire for Border Collies. Histories often claim that all modern Border Collies trace back to Hemp, but as far as I can tell this is impossible to verify since the ISDS studbooks don't include any of his offspring. There's no questioning he's a key dog and an important founding sire, but the fact is that Border Collies developed a lot more organically than that and that therefore they don't fit the format of the "origin myth" that most conformation breeds follow. When conformation breeds all trace back to one identifiable dog it's usually because the stud book was originally constructed to only include descendants of that dog. This didn't happen with Border Collies.

Long story short, the kennel club appearance standards supposedly describe Old Hemp, who was black and white, rough coated, with Irish markings. He'd be perfectly recognizable as a working Border Collie today, but would probably get laughed out of the show ring.

Melanie Lee Chang > Form ever follows function. Departments of Anthropology and Biology >
University of Pennsylvania > Louis Sullivan (Email Removed) >
in thread (Email Removed) (Melanie L Chang) whittled the following words:
: I know of a few breeders who do field coursing and a couple who do : live coursing with their dogs, but they're in the minority. Do the conformation dogs retain the same chasing/hunting instinct as performance-bred sighthounds?

Since lurecoursing is very popular among sight hounds, I would say yes
Since lurecoursing is very popular among sight hounds, I would say yes

that makes about as much sense as stating that, since herding is so popular with BCs, it must mean that conformation BCs automagically retain the same sort of herding instinct that working BCs have.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

I shut my eyes in order to see.
Paul Gauguin
Long story short, the kennel club appearance standards supposedly describe Old Hemp, who was black and white, rough coated, with Irish markings. He'd be perfectly recognizable as a working Border Collie today, but would probably get laughed out of the show ring.
Sounds like the standard for German Shepherds. Though the GSDCA is gradually changing the written standard to try and meet what the top conformation breeders are producing.
Question for you about border collies and trials. I always thought the purpose of breeding border collies was to produce working stockdogs. On a particular email list, there is a working bordercollie person that gives the impression that the whole purpose of breeding and training border collies is to be able to trial. Now, I understand that trialing helps show which dogs can work strange stock in strange locations, but I didn't think it was the be all and end for border collies, correct?

Beth
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