I was watching Animal Planet and they had an episode of Animal Cops San Francisco that interested me. They were responding to call regarding a dangerous dog. A pit bull had bitten a college-aged guy pretty badly after it had bitten in another incident just a week before. I was interested in the circumstances, so I kept watching. I can see a pit going after a small child that acts more like a dog, but it seemed odd that the pit had gone after an adult, especially more than once.

So I'm wondering if it's a pit mix or a full pit and what exactly happened. It turns out that people had three pit bulls in the house and got injured only when they were breaking up fights between the pit bulls. It makes me wonder how many of the pit bull bite statistics are people who don't know what they are doing trying to break up a fight. Although pits seem like they would be lower risk for bites in general, I can see a higher risk of biting a human trying to break up a fight than most dogs.

Whereas many dogs would just back off when a human got into the middle of it, pits would be more likely to keep it going and end up biting whoever stuck a body part in the way to try to break it up. Does anyone (including pit bull advocate groups) track any of that to see whether dogs getting a rap as people aggressive are actually just showing fallout from dog aggression? IT would be really interesting to have more info on that, at least to me.

I have to wonder what the hell was going on with these people. Not only do the people not seem to realize that pits are likely to fight each other and shouldn't be left to interact together (especially after they have already been in a fight), but the animal control officers don't seem to get it, either. They recommended after the first call that the people get rid of the aggressor dog, from what I picked up, but they never talked to them about keeping dog-aggressive breeds away from each other, even though two pit bulls would be left in that house with the same clueless people even after the third one was taken away.

Paula
"Or if you really want to meet me just take the NJT to 78, take 78 to 24, take 24 until it runs out, and then just drive around listening for the sound of quietly smoldering rage." Ben Allard
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Although pits seem like they would be lower risk
for bites in general, I can see a higher risk of biting a human trying to break up a fight ... it going and end up biting whoever stuck a body part in the way to try to break it up.

My understanding is that the reverse is true. Since Pits were bred as fighting dogs it would be /expected/ that their handlers might need to jump in an break things up. Whereas transferance isn't unusual many dogs Pits that did this were culled. And so you are less likely to be bitten by a Pit in these circumstances.
But I'm not a Pit Bull person, so I could be blowing smoke.

Still, the general sense of your post is intersting. Heck, it could apply to all breeds.
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
Although pits seem like they would be lower risk

for bites in general, I can see a higher risk ... part in the way to try to break it up.

My understanding is that the reverse is true. Since Pits were bred as fighting dogs it would be /expected/ that ... this were culled. And so you are less likely to be bitten by a Pit in these circumstances.

That could also be true. I was thinking in terms of just being so into the fight that they keep going at it and someone gets hurt rather than actually going after the person who was trying to break it up. I haven't had any experience with a dog going after me specifically when I was trying to break up a fight, but I have been bit breaking up a fight. The feeling I had about those situations in which I was actually there was that the dog was going for the other dog and just got my body part because it materialized in between the two dogs.
But I'm not a Pit Bull person, so I could be blowing smoke. Still, the general sense of your post is intersting. Heck, it could apply to all breeds.

That's true. I had kind of wondered how the statistics might be skewed in general by what would be reported as attacks on humans which were actually attacks on dogs where a human got in the bite path.

Paula
"Or if you really want to meet me just take the NJT to 78, take 78 to 24, take 24 until it runs out, and then just drive around listening for the sound of quietly smoldering rage." Ben Allard
I had kind of wondered how the statistics might be skewed in general by what would be reported as attacks on humans which were actually attacks on dogs where a human got in the bite path.

The only bite I've had in recent years is when an dog went after Friday. I was talking to the dog's owner and had Friday on a tight leash so I was able to swing him behind me. In this case, I knowingly took the bite (*I* have medical insurance - Friday doesn't), but the dog (an Evil GSD) nevernever would have purposely bitten me.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
That's true. I had kind of wondered how the statistics might be skewed in general by what would be reported as attacks on humans which were actually attacks on dogs where a human got in the bite path.

There used to be a "Pit Bull guy" on the rec.pets.dogs.breeds board about 5 years ago (I just got back on, so I don't know where he went). I'm not a "Pit Bull person," but I was into Boxers (often confused with Pit Bulls by people that don't know better...
A few things that I learned.. Most "attacks" blamed on Pit Bulls are actually not Pit Bulls (it is a media sensation thing). Pit Bulls are bred to be dog aggressive, but human friendly (and actually can make really, really good family dogs, if raised properly). Pit Bulls do not have locking jaws and are not supposed to have an underbite, they just have EXTREMELY strong jaws. The Pit Bulls that do attack people are due to improper breeding, training and handling...the breed is not supposed to be a guardian breed.
As far as bite path: the only time I've ever been bit was when I got in the path of my boxer going after my sister's boxer when I was younger (about 10 or 11). Bookie lunged, I went to grab her, she got me instead. She had locked her jaws and I had yanked. As soon as she realized she had me, she released. So, I would say it is likely that many people that try to break up dog fights get bit...the physics, or whatever, just doesn't seem to be in the favor of the humans.
Mali
My understanding is that the reverse is true. Since Pits were bred as fighting dogs it would be /expected/ that ... bitten by a Pit in these circumstances. But I'm not a Pit Bull person, so I could be blowing smoke.

i've always read (and believed) the same thing, but since most pit bulls aren't bred for the fighting ring anymore, i'm starting to wonder of this trait is disappearing from the breed. i know that Lola will immediately back off if she even brushes her teeth across human skin, but Manu has accidentally bitten me more than once. i've always blamed the non-pit bull part of him, but who knows. most of the pit bulls out there are BYBs or rescues (also probably BYBs) anyway, so i doubt they're being bred for temperament.
-kelly
I
haven't had any experience with a dog going after me specifically when I was trying to break up a fight, ... was going for the other dog and just got my body part because it materialized in between the two dogs.

An acquaintance of mine was bitten rather badly by his own dog when breaking up a fight. I've been bitten, but only on accident as one dog went for another as you said. This dog not only latched on to her owner, but shook his arm. Hard. It wasn't pretty.
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
i've always read (and believed) the same thing, but since most pit bulls aren't bred for the fighting ring anymore, i'm starting to wonder of this trait is disappearing from the breed.

"The Golden Rule of Dog Breeding: If the trait is good, and you don't select for it, you will lose it. If the trait is bad, and you don't select away from it, you will get it."

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply by e-mail
How Bush's vodka thwarted Putin's thugs. Na zdorovia! http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE ID=42619
An acquaintance of mine was bitten rather badly by his own dog when breaking up a fight. I've been bitten, ... as you said. This dog not only latched on to her owner, but shook his arm. Hard. It wasn't pretty.

ouch!
yeah, Manu's accidental bites have always been bite, release immediately. maybe the pit bull bit did kick in after all.
ugh, if Manu shook with my arm in his mouth, he'd likely pull it out of it's socket. he nearly does that just playing tug.
-kelly
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