My dogs barking is going to get me thrown out of my house..

His really bad habit is to run out into the garden and bark like crazy at the trees-he hates birds/squirrels/cats etc being anywhere near them-he even barks when there is nothing there, just in case...He barks/growls whANYONE passes the house-even people he knows..
He's a cross JR/collie and I think he's quite a nervous dog (don't know why though-he's been with me since 8 weeks old-3 years now-and had nothing but love and kindness. Lovely chap, but the barking is getting beyond a joke now..
I don't like the idea of electric shock collars which I've seen advertised, so how the heck does one train a dog not to bark?? Thanks in advance
Jerry
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My dogs barking is going to get me thrown out of my house.. His really bad habit is to run ... old-3 years now-and had nothing but love and kindness. Lovely chap, but the barking is getting beyond a joke now..

If you didn't (don't?) like the idea of an energetic (no, not nervous) dog, that likes to bark, chase squirrels, cats, etc., why did you get a JR/collie cross?
Your dog is bored; he's just looking for something to *do.*

Have you ever OBEDIENCE TRAINED him?
If not, get started ASAP.
And find other ways to give your dog more EXERCISE, like retrieving games, hunting, etc., where you can wear off some of that limitless energy.
If you don't find things for your dog to do, he'll find them himself, and they probably won't be ones you'll enjoy.
You might want to find a local agility club (you're in the UK, right?), too, where you'll discover other ways to wear him down.

And forget about the e-collar.
Go with the flow, so to speak.
Don't fight it.

Jack "The Unpalatable Barbarian" Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to send me e-mail
A timely look back at the liberals' creed:
http://www.ashbrook.org/publicat/oped/alt/04/creed.html
If you didn't (don't?) like the idea of an energetic (no, not nervous) dog, that likes to bark, chase squirrels, cats, etc., why did you get a JR/collie cross?

No, not energetic-nervous. He looks round constantly, licks his lips, walks in a highly agitated manner etc. Barks at cats etc then runs back to me like a nervous child. I've seen similar traits in some humans!
Your dog is bored; he's just looking for something to *do.*

He has plenty to do. He's never left alone for long, gets plenty of walks/excercise/games/attention.
Have you ever OBEDIENCE TRAINED him?

Nope, just very basic training stuff in the early days.
And find other ways to give your dog more EXERCISE, like retrieving games, hunting, etc., where you can wear off some of that limitless energy.

Only so many hours in the day to run and play etc, I have to work, but if not me, someone else looks after him.
And forget about the e-collar.

It was NEVER an option..
Thanks for the rapid reply!
His really bad habit is to run out into the garden and bark like crazy at the trees-he hates birds/squirrels/cats ... barks/growls whANYONE passes the house-even people he knows.. He's a cross JR/collie and I think he's quite a nervous dog

He may or may not be nervous, but I doubt if that has anything to do with the barking, which is PERFECTLY NORMAL for his breed. Jack Russell Terriers have been selectively bred for nearly 200 years expressly for the purpose of barking loudly and persistently at prey animals, and crossing one with a collie does little to change the natural instinct.
don't know why though-he's been with me since 8 weeks old-3 years now-and had nothing but love and kindness.

How about exercise? How many times a day do you exercise him, and for how long? What activities do you participate in with him? Both Jack Russells and Border Collies (since you're in the UK, I'm guessing that when you say "collie", you mean Border Collie or working sheepdog) are dogs bred to work for extended periods of time, and both need regular hard, off-leash exercise and a job to do.
I don't like the idea of electric shock collars which I've seen advertised, so how the heck does one train a dog not to bark??

You don't train a dog not to do what it was born and bred to do. However, if you give your dog adequate exercise and a job to do, and don't leave him out in your yard unattended - where he's clearly invented his own job to do, in accordance with what both sides of his ancestry dictate - the problem should be sharply reduced.

I own a Jack Russell Terrier, a collie-cross lurcher, and a Redbone Coonhound cross - all working breeds with high exercise requirments, two of which are also bred to be LOUD. However, their barking is not a problem because I exercise them 1-3 hours a day, allow them plenty of opportunity to fulfill their hunting instincts while doing so, and never leave them out in my yard unattended for more than a few minutes.
This coming from the mental midget Howe who claims all his testimonials can be verified but refuses to give contact phone numbers to actually VERIFY the quotes.
Once a liar, always a liar. That would be Howe.
I am not sure how helpful this will be...but...the dog in my "Nuerotic Hound" post was an extreme barker.
There is some truth to what people are saying about your breed being known for barking. Training him not to bark is contradictory to his wants and needs. It is how he express's himself. There is a difference though between training him not to bark and making his barking manageable (and tolerable). It is like training a Beagle not to sniff...there is a difference between a sniffing Beagle and the Beagle who wanders off chasing down every scent it can. It makes sense to train the Beagle not to wander off, ...but it does not makes sense to train him not to sniff at all.
Punishing him for barking will likely not work.
The more regular exercise you can get him the better. Does the UK have dog parks like they do here?
What about a local breed club? Many, many breed clubs have activities geared towards the specific needs and tendencies of the breeds they represent. Obedience may help, though I suspect more along the vien of developing a certian bond and/or hiearchy of authority rather than stopping a specific behavior like barking. Though successful future training...for barking or anything else...will only be made easier by an obedience class. So it is a good place to start.
We found that getting Tilly not to bark was a kind of...distraction therapy. She would get into this "zone" and bark like crazy. What we found most helpful was to find some method to distract her. It was as simple as looking out the window, thanking her for telling us about the dangerous leaf that had blown by out front and then removing her from the window..(sometimes we would have to whistle)..as soon as she was quiet, we told her how good a girl she was for being quite and then give her something else to do...be it play ball with her for a few minutes, a raw hide, whatever. What distraction method may work for your dog?...that I cannot say. Perhaps a rescue, experienced in your breed, could offer the best advice.
I am not sure how helpful this will be...but...the dog in my "Nuerotic Hound" post was an extreme barker. There ... may work for your dog?...that I cannot say. Perhaps a rescue, experienced in your breed, could offer the best advice.

Thanks Rob-good sensible advice.
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