A snake might have bitten my dog, & I need to know what kind of snake it is.
The snake I found, has a brown stripe down its back, & gray/beige stripes down its sides.
There are mis-shapen spots, down the stripes.
Gray/Beige spots, down the Brown stripe on top, ... & Brown spots, down the Gray/Beige stripes on its sides.
The snake's head was a triangular shape, which might mean it's poisonous.
???
Susan, Su Texas my opinions
PS I live in East Texas.
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A snake might have bitten my dog, & I need to know what kind of snake it is. The snake ... a triangular shape, which might mean it's poisonous. ??? Susan, Su Texas my opinions PS I live in East Texas.

If it wasn't a rattlesnake then it's probably not anything you have to worry about. If you saw the tail and it didn't have a rattle then it couldn't have been that.
There are three other types of venomous snakes in TX: A coral snake (clearly not what you described, because they have red bands touching yellow bands and also have black bands) a copperhead (which is tan or reddish or pinkish with "Hershey's kisses" patterns in brown down the sides, and cottonmouths, which are dark colored and have a "raccoon mask" across their eyes.

The "triangular shape" isn't always a good indicator on what's venomous and what's not, because even non-venomous snakes can make their heads look that way and some venomous snakes don't have that shape.

This site might help you to identify the animal you saw: http://www.lifesci.utexas.edu/research/txherps /
Here are some images of venomous snakes:
http://www.houstonherp.com/SnakesKeyList.htm
If you're in doubt you should go to the vet just in case.

-Rubystars
A snake might have bitten my dog, & I need to know what kind of snake it is. The snake ... a triangular shape, which might mean it's poisonous. ??? Susan, Su Texas my opinions PS I live in East Texas.

Unfortunately this sounds like it's probably it:
http://www.zo.utexas.edu/research/txherps/snakes/sistrurus.miliarius.html

"Sistrurus miliarius is an small, attractive rattlesnake easily distinguished by its short tail, tiny rattle, and rust-colored vertebral stripe that contrasts strongly with the light grey dorsal background. (The vertebral stripe, may be absent in some individuals.) There is a series of small, dark, irregular vertebral blotches which run the length of the body. "
Here's another page about that rattlesnake with pics: http://www.uga.edu/srel/rattlesnake.htm
Here's a rattlesnake that might be it:
http://www.zo.utexas.edu/research/txherps/snakes/sistrurus.catenatus.html

These look like it could be it but aren't in the range map for East Texas: http://www.zo.utexas.edu/research/txherps/snakes/masticophis.schotti.html http://www.zo.utexas.edu/research/txherps/snakes/salvadora.grahamiae.html http://www.zo.utexas.edu/research/txherps/snakes/thamnophis.marcianus.html

These are other possibilities that are in the right area: http://www.zo.utexas.edu/research/txherps/snakes/storeria.dekayi.html http://www.zo.utexas.edu/research/txherps/snakes/thamnophis.proximus.html http://www.zo.utexas.edu/research/txherps/snakes/nerodia.clarkii.html http://www.zo.utexas.edu/research/txherps/snakes/tropidoclonion.lineatum.html
A snake might have bitten my dog, & I need to know what kind of snake it is. The snake ... spots, down the Gray/Beige stripes on its sides. The snake's head was a triangular shape, which might mean it's poisonous.

Honestly, it sounds like a Texas Brown Snake ( Storeria dekayi texana ). I have terrible pictures at
http://www.mcmartinville.com/chris/reptiles/trips/wisconsin/brown.htm. Better pics can be had at
http://www.herpnet.net/Minnesota-Herpetology/snakes/Brown snake.html or do a Google search for the scientific name for more.
Their heads can often look "triangular" in shape, especially to those inexperienced with snakes MOST snakes' heads look triangular in shape!

These snakes don't get very big, and eat worms and slugs and other invertebrates. Good snakes to have around.
Keep in mind that it's very "risky" to ask for an ID of a snake sight-unseen by those you're asking!
One last thing no snake is poisonous; you can eat ANY of them! Emotion: smile
Chris
http://www.mcmartinville.com
Thank you Chris & Ruby.
The snake I found was inside the house, caught in a mouse trap, & was about two feet long. It kept striking at anything & everything. I'm concerned that there might be a nest of them nearby. ???

One of my dogs has a swelling on her side, which I'll need to better examine today, & possibly take her to the vet.
I'm injured & have cancer, & was at a doctor's appt yesterday in Longview, then I completely collapsed. (When I tried to examined the dog's side, she kept moving around & wouldn't let me, so I had to give up. She didn't seem in distress.)
Today, now that I've rested some, I'll try to examine it, & figure out about the swelling. It might be a swollen lymph gland or something.

In Dec. 1998, I was bitten by a snake, which some people here guessed might be a "ground rattler", because they are so plentiful/common. It struck my leg beside a TENS unit pad, probably got an electric shock, & didn't leave much venom, ... or else, it wasn't a poisonous snake.

I remember that the bite area burned very badly for a while, then stopped.
Snakes are extremely plentiful in East Texas. Many kinds.

I'm so scared of them that (usually) I can't remember their markings exactly, or describe them very well, for which I apologize.

Susan, Su Texas my opinions
Thank you Chris & Ruby. The snake I found was inside the house, caught in a mouse trap, & was ... I can't remember their markings exactly, or describe them very well, for which I apologize. Susan, Su Texas my opinions

You should definitely take your dog to the vet immediately.

I'm sorry to hear you aren't in the best health and I send you my best wishes for both you and your dog.
Be careful even of dead snakes because a snake's head can still bite through reflex if you handle it.
I know it's hard for me to ask you not to be afraid of snakes, because they do pose a danger where you are but it would probably help to realize that even the venomous ones do more good than harm, they eat a lot of "pests" and most venomous individuals never come in contact with humans.

Don't water your yard too often because that can attract snakes and rodents, make sure you don't leave dog food out, etc. Make sure you do what you can to discourage rodents and not water your lawn too often and that will help somewhat with the snake problem. Also make sure if you go outside at night to use a flashlight to illuminate the ground and that will help too.

-Rubystars
I'm so scared of them that (usually) I can't remember their markings exactly, or describe them very well, for which I apologize. Susan, Su Texas my opinions

Hi Susan,
I sent you an email yesterday that bounced back. I live in Dallas, so I'm not too familiar with what you have around longview. I do know the most common snake I find around here is the Texas ratsnake. The description you gave isn't a perfect fit for a Tx rat, but I still think thats most likely what you had. Its hard to really see patterns on snakes when you aren't familiar with them.
The gray color is consistent with a texas rat, as well as the brown blotches down the sides. This snake has a really wide range of color and even pattern to a degree.
They're also completely harmless to anything bigger than a mouse! As far as it being a rattler, I'm quite sure you would know if it was, especially if it was caught in a trap inside ! And it is highly unlikely that it was a pygmy rattler as someone suggested. The pygmy rattler is NOT a common animal in any areas of Texas that I have searched. I have a friend who has been looking for a pygmy rattler for over 3 years, and has only seen one dead on the road. Also, a pygmy would more likely be about 10-12" and not the 2 foot snake you found. If it was any rattlesnake 2 foot long, the rattle would be very apparent to you.
Also, the reaction of the snake is quite consistent with a texas ratsnake, anyone who has handled one will tell you that : )
They are an extremely aggressive snake, they repeatedly strike at anything that moves, and will stare at you with their mouth wide open. Again, they are not dangerous snakes, the most they could do to you is possibly break the flesh, you might bleed a little bit and have a bit of a scab afterward. They will scare you a whole lot more than they will hurt you. Here is a link to a tx rat found in Keller
http://forum.kingsnake.com/dfwherp/messages/1058.html

Remember though, the color changes a lot! from specimen to specimen. Gives a good look at the head shape and the aggressive nature of these animals though.
My advice If you are that afraid of these animals, but you are worried about coming across them again, then spend the money to buy a pair of snake tongs. The tongs allow you to handle the snakes without getting too close to them.
And please, don't kill them when you find them @!! If you just moved him to the edge of your property, or a little further, I doubt you would ever see him again. And again, the chances of finding a dangerous snake in your home is slim. Unless it is a rattlesnake (very recognizable) a copperhead (very recognizable) or a cottonmouth (not as deadly as a rattler), or unlikely, a coralsnake, then it is a harmless snake and nothing to worry about.
We'd love to see a picture of the snake, even dead. Then we could really be more help.
And one last thing, if the dog is still alive today and acting normal, then I wouldn't worry about taking him to a vet. I'm sure he's fine.

-Ryan
Thank you Chris & Ruby. The snake I found was inside the house, caught in a mouse trap, & was about two feet long. It kept striking at anything & everything. I'm concerned that there might be a nest of them nearby. ???

There's not really any such thing as a "nest" of snakes; I think the legends began with someone who observed numbers of snakes moving into their winter hibernacula. Of course, there's always the dreaded floating "nest" of cottonmouths which attack waterskiers. Emotion: smile
One of my dogs has a swelling on her side, which I'll need to better examine today, & possibly take her to the vet.

It's not uncommon for some people and animals to have an adverse reaction to even harmless snakes' bites. It's been documented with hognose and garter snakes.
In Dec. 1998, I was bitten by a snake, which some people here guessed might be a "ground rattler", because they are so plentiful/common.

I'd like to see pictures of what constitutes a "ground rattler." Better yet, I'd like to see what constitutes a "tree rattler," since ALL rattlers are pretty much confined to the "ground" vs. being arboreal.

I'm still leaning towards the TX Brown theory; a Texas rat snake of the size you describe would not fit the description you gave. However, the fact it was caught in a mouse trap has piqued my curiosity.

Chris
http://www.mcmartinville.com
I'm so scared of them that (usually) I can't remember ... well, for which I apologize. Susan, Su Texas my opinions

Hi Susan, I sent you an email yesterday that bounced back. I live in Dallas, so I'm not too familiar ... on the road. Also, a pygmy would more likely be about 10-12" and not the 2 foot snake you found.

I know how sizes can get exaggerated by people who are frightened so I wasn't taking the size quote too literally. The reason why I mentioned the pygmy rattler was that it was the only venomous snake I could find that could match the description she gave and I thought maybe she should take her dog to the vet anyway just to be on the safe side.

-Rubystars
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