Hi All:
This has been a terrible two days for Tania, my 13 year old feral female Main Coon, and for me as well.
Christmas eve Tania started bleeding from her vagina. I took her immediately to VERG (http://www.vetemergencyreferral.com ) Xrays, ultrasound, and blood tests revealed her uterus was infected, and a Spay operation was needed. It was performed yesterday, Christmas day by the director of the hospital.
I just brought her home. She is so happy! I was expecting that she would attack me, but she is being very sweet, wanting to sit in my lap.

She has this clear plastic cone collar on so she can't get to her stitches. The problem is that she can't eat because the collar doesn't allow her to dip her head the way she is used to. Also, she has a drinkwell fountain, and of course can't reach the water. I put some small cups, cups smaller than the opening in her collar, filled with water.

Will she learn how to get around the impediment? Or should I see if there is a smaller collar available? She is wobbly on her feet, bumping into things, can't jump to her favorite places..

I am concerened about her not seemingly being able to eat and drink with this thing on. She has to wear this for 14 days, then return to the hospital to have the stitches removed.
Any ideas???
TIA
Bob
1 2 3 4 5
Suddenly, without warning, Seafire exclaimed (12/26/2009 7:39 PM):
Hi All: This has been a terrible two days for Tania, my 13 year old feral female Main Coon, and ... to wear this for 14 days, then return to the hospital to have the stitches removed. Any ideas??? TIA Bob

Yup. When my cat needed to wear the collar for a while, we found she couldn't adjust to an opaque one - she would get stuck at corners and walls because she couldn't see what was stopping her. The new collar we bought for her was clear and a bit shorter front and back - still long enough she couldn't get to her hind leg, but short enough that she could maneuver it to eat and drink out of her bowls, and since she had her peripheral vision back she got around much better.

If we were home and could watch her continuously, we'd take the collar off for a while - but as soon as she tried to mess with her injury, it went back on (and of course if we left the house it was on). She learned pretty fast.
Good luck with your kitty, I hope she's feeling better soon!

jmc
jmc
Hi All: This has been a terrible two days for Tania, my 13 year old feral female Main Coon, and ... was infected, and a Spay operation was needed. It was performed yesterday, Christmas day by the director of the hospital.

Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?
Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?

Because I don't believe in mutilating animals. She is a house cat, always in. I will miss her estrus' she was the most loving and gentle during those times.
Bob
Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?

Because I don't believe in mutilating animals. She is a house cat, always in. I will miss her estrus' she was the most loving and gentle during those times.

What do you do when the male cats come around and she detects them, and goes into her mating drives?
I had a feral cat that did that, and she tore things up to get to the male cats, so I had to put her back out.
Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?

Because I don't believe in mutilating animals.[/nq]Do you know why your cat had pyometra, Einstein? Because you didn't get her spayed. Your silly belief almost cost your cat her life. When a female cat is in estrus, the mucous membrane that lines the uterus (the endometrium) is constantly exposed to high concentrations of estrogen and then even higher concentrations of progesterone. If she doesn't get pregenant, cystic endometrial hyperplasia can develop. CEH predisposes the uterus to bacterial infection followed by the production and accumulation of pus- which can cause the uterus to rupture- which can cause death due to sepsis or organ failure if not treated immediately.

You're very lucky she had open-cervix pyometra because the vaginal discharge alerted you in time before the uterus ruptured. If the cervix was closed, you wouldn't have seen a discharge and the only signs you would have seen were coma followed by death.
Spaying a cat with pyometra is 100x more risky than a normal spay becuse the pus-filled uterus can easily rupture during surgery. Once again your silly belief exposed your cat to a very serious and unnecessary risk.

This a normal feline uterus
http://maxshouse.com/Feline Reproduction/feline uterus.jpg

This is uterus with pyometra
Reproduction/Pyometra.jpg

The danger didn't end with the spay. She's also at very high risk of developing mammary cancer. Cats spayed after 2.5 years old have a risk or incident rate 7 times higher than cats spayed before the first cycle. Most tumors occur in cats 9-11 years of age and are found primarily in the breasts closer to the tail. So, you better check her breasts very frequently.
She is a house cat,
always in. I will miss her estrus'

She definitely won't miss estrus. Estrus is not a fun time for female cats.
she was the most loving and gentle
during those times.

She was also extremely uncomfortable.
Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?

Because I don't believe in mutilating animals.

Do you consider women who get hysterectomies "mutilated?" Unspayed animals are prone to pyometra, a deadly infection and breast cancer. Do you feel those things are better for her? =O
She is a house cat,
always in. I will miss her estrus' she was the most loving and gentle during those times.

She paid for your pleasure.. she could have paid with her life.

"They can not ask for kindness, or for mercy plead. Yet cruel is our blindness, which does not see their need. World-over, town or city, God trusts us with this task; To give our love and pity to those who can not ask." Unknown
~~
What do you do when the male cats come around and she detects them, and goes into her mating drives?

We live on a yacht. The only animal which has come on deck has been a raccoon. In the 13 years I have had Tania, I have never had a problem. She never tore anything up, except for me a few times.

Bob
Do you consider women who get hysterectomies "mutilated?"

Only if the hysterectomy is performed for no good medical reason. They used to be performed as a matter of course. In those instances, where there is no indication of disease, yes, it's mutilation.
Unspayed animals are prone to pyometra, a deadly infection and breast cancer.

This I didn't know. I have had several cats in my long life, but all came spayed or neutered. Tania came literally off Manhattan streets as a wild feral animal. It took a full year of her living with me before I could approach her without needing stitches. I am the only human she will allow near her. She had to be wrapped in a towel and sedated so she could be examined the other day. It's always a dangerous proposition bringing her to the vet for her check ups and shots, so I do it only when required.
Thanks for the info!
Now, if I can figure out how this poor cat is going to eat and drink with this cone over her head, and her wobbling around on unsteady legs, I will feel better. I have to give her pain meds in the morning and evening, it's oral, but they set up several syringes pre-measured so all I have to do is shoot it into her mouth. Then once a day she gets antibiotics, also pre-measured in syringes. All tis is doable, but 14 days in that cone seems like a dangerous proposition.

Bob
Bob
Show more