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Well, if you exhaust them they are a lot easier to catch when they do chase a rabbit.

That has not been my experience.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
Buzzsaw is not making excuses or disclaimers for what isn't being done, simply because he's already putting to maximum use, what resources are available to him.

Geez, diddy, what's got you all defensive?
Buzzsaw is a very good and committed owner.

Who needs to roll up the windows and restrain the dog in the car. That'll do bugger all for the shrieking but will keep the dog from becoming a traffic fatality.
Also, it's possible to attach an inward-facing extension to a solid fence, invisible from the exterior, that will discourage fence-climbing. In fact, a 12"-18" wide piece of chicken wire stapled to the fence about a foot from the top all the way around (staple the lower edge of the wire so the top "flops" out and arcs down) would likely do the trick.

So, two simple mechanical solutions to the two stated problems.
in thread Mary Healey (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
Geez, diddy, what's got you all defensive?

Your imagination is in overdrive.
I agree about the restraint. The rest was for clarification on the subject based on what I've researched and seen
Well, if you exhaust them they are a lot easier to catch when they do chase a rabbit.

That has not been my experience.

Well, if you're chasing your dog you're already making the situation worse. But no, a dog in prey drive is motivated to be more than casually zippy. Mind you, if a dog is exhausted to the point of dropping he probably won't be as interested in chasing prey, but that's so exceptionally rare that it's safe to assume that that's not what's under discussion.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

If you can't say it clearly, you don't understand it yourself John Searle
Max is a very high drive pitbull/mastiff type dog. gorgeous mahogany Brindle.

I'm confused. Why are there hints that Max is a rescue GH? Janet Bosswww.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

Sorry - just to be clear. Max is not a Greyhound - I only made mention of that because of the crazy obession he has for rabbits. I thought because GH chase rabbits for a "living" and then are adoptable house pets that a technique of some sort was used to stop the bunny chasing. I was basically trying to understand why some GH calm down and aren't looking for something moving 24/7 and try to apply to my dog.
Thanks for the kind words Diddy - I am trying.
And thanks for everyone for the advice - although as depressing as it may be. I wan't looking or thought there would be a magic pill. But didn't know if stuffed toys add to the problem, or when he runs away if shocking would turn him back or make him run more (I haven't shocked yet at all and really not considering it).
This may help. Max's number 1 problem is attention or lack of it. You know how some dogs look at their owner the whole time and wag their tale? Max is always on the hunt looking around, sniffing, focused. In obidence (we went twice) we worked on attention where I reward him for eye contact (holding a treat out to my side, and waiting for him to look at me and not treat) it really didn't work. Max could care less (for the most part) about treat rewards.

If a squirell we outside the window and he couldn't get it just be able to bark and look at it and warm T-bone steak were on the floor, the steak would go uneaten. He is just that way. Say I get back home from the walk and I am opening the front of our door to go in, he is behind me still looking around not paying attention that it is time to go in and eat. I really need to get his attention but don't know how. I have tried in obidence training. Now, he will not go in / out of doors before me without me releasing him, he waits to be told to eat while sitting, he waits to be released when I take him to the tennis court, etc.

So he does "listen".
As far as what Max is - good question. The ridgeback rescue did initially get in me in touch with his former owner, whether he is RR or not - who knows. Maybe this pictures will help determine -











Well another qurik - not sure if it is related. If I or my Girlfriend's kids are on a bike he barks like mad and if outside he will bite the tire. If it is anyone else going by on a bike, he doesn't care. And doesn't care about bikes during his walks either. Maybe he just doesn't want us to leave him ? ; )
Thanks again everyone !
or when he runs away if shocking would turn him back or make him run more (I haven't shocked yet at all and really not considering it).>>

Ok - before ever using an e-collar, PROPER introduction and training is needed. This is one reason they get a bad rap - people who think that maybe they can just put it on and push a button. ARGHH!! Thank you for choosing NOT to do that!

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
in thread Janet Boss (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
Ok - before ever using an e-collar, PROPER introduction and training is needed. This is one reason they get a ... maybe they can just put it on and push a button. ARGHH!! Thank you for choosing NOT to do that!

Actually he's been introduced to a person that I would trust him to teach proper E-collar training. He's got that in reserve, should he ever be backed into the wall enough to use it.
This may help. Max's number 1 problem is attention or lack of it. You know how some dogs look at their owner the whole time and wag their tale? Max is always on the hunt looking around, sniffing, focused.

He sounds a lot like Elliott. Elliott had no idea I existed when he was crittering. And, while he didn't go over fences, he did go under and even through them. Watching him like a hawk when he was outdoors was required. If he'd been a climber and not a digger/breaker-througher, I would have put him on a cable tie out when outside. If you have a privacy fence, you have more options than I did.
And no way on earth would I ride in a car with an unsecured dog or have the back windows open while there's a dog in the car.
If a squirell we outside the window and he couldn't get it just be able to bark and look at it and warm T-bone steak were on the floor, the steak would go uneaten.

That sounds very familiar. Cutting Elliott off from distractions helped. If he went nuts while looking out the screen door, I shut the door. Otherwise, he'd scream and try to break through the door to get to the critter. As I had dozens of bunnies living on my property, that could get to be a headache.
So he does "listen".

Again, very familiar. Elliott was a beautifully behaved boy most of the time. He just lost his mind when he saw a critter or another dog.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
I agree about the restraint. The rest was for clarification on the subject based on what I've researched and seen

Why did you think clarification was needed?

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
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