Tobi is a labradoodle who simply LOVES playing in the snow. However, being a labradoodle, it is hair and not fur - and he ends up with LOTS of snow stuck to his legs. Serious - not a few little snowballs, but almost up to his belly. Like huge white boots. And the only easy way to get them out is to wash his with warm water.
The problem is that I am planning to do some snow-shoeing this winter, and want to take him with me. However, not only he will accumulate lots of snow (seriously heavy to walk with), but I am also worried about the time it will take to get back home, with all that snow on him. Frostbite?

Thoughts/suggestions/ideas to prevent the whole thing?

For instance, I even though of rubbing some kind of oil on his legs, to prevent the snow from sticking on the hair... who knows...

Thanks,
Simon & Tobi
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to take him with me. However, not only he will accumulate lots of snow (seriously heavy to walk with), but I am also worried about the time it will take to get back home, with all that snow on him. Frostbite?

Not likely unless you live someplace extremely cold.
For instance, I even though of rubbing some kind of oil on his legs, to prevent the snow from sticking on the hair... who knows...

I wouldn't, because you don't want the coat to lose its insulative quality. You could experiment, I guess, with spray-on cooking oil (Pam, for example), which would be less likely to saturate the coat and doesn't require pressure to apply.
By the way, a number of years someone ran an all-poodle team in the Iditarod and had a huge problem with snow sticking to the dogs (and vice versa), and the following year the race was restricted to traditional northern-breed dogs because of it.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Don't think you are going to conceal faults by concealing evidence that they ever existed. Dwight D Eisenhower
Speaking of that race, totally OT nonetheless, Melinda, I've been meaning to warn you if you have not seen the film "Kevin of the North", for God's sake DON'T!! I know bupkiss about sledding and so forth and *I* was insulted. MAN, what a stupid film! A guy has 48 hours to prepare for the race from never having heard of it and he participates with a pack of random breeds from the dog pound with no training (couple of cute dogs, though, chiefly the St.

Bernard and the boxer and the reddish shepherd mix). Anyway, the film is bad, bad, bad on so many other levels it's just scary. I watched probably 2/3 of it recently when it came on TV and I was sick and there was nothing else on and I'd finished my book and was just trying to get sleepy. I gave up and watched a documentary on Akhenaton I've seen four times on Discovery Civilization. OK, I'm done interrupting this thread. I have no good suggestions about keeping the snow off the dog's legs, sorry.

Katrina
Not likely unless you live someplace extremely cold.

i would worry about discomfort more than frostbite. those hard ice balls that form in the snow have got to be uncomfortable, especially on a poodley coat.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com /
By the way, a number of years someone ran an all-poodle team in the Iditarod and had a huge problem with snow sticking to the dogs (and vice versa), and the following year the race was restricted to traditional northern-breed dogs because of it.

That would be awful..I know Coda's coat holds snow like crazy. However, there's a team out of MT that runs w/ Belgian Sheepdogs and huskies of some sort, probably mixes of the two as well I am unsure. But, the Belgians, with proper coat anyway, don't seem to have much of an issue with the clinging snowballs.
Bodhi got a few up in his britches back when we had snow enough for them to play in, but Coda had them hanging all over him and stuck in between his toes and everywhere.
I'm hoping for snow here, just because I think that the puppy will love it. Shelly w/ Coda & The Black Pack
MAN, what a stupid film!

I thought so, too. On beyond bad, plus pretty racist & homophobic - not really the kind of thing you want kids to see, I would think.
There's a Siberian kennel in BC that among other things provides dogs and training for sleddogs in films and commercials, and they were involved in "Kevin of the North." Photos at http://www.nakitsilik.com/Portraits&Brags.htm

My favorite sledding movie, hands down, is "Iron Will." It has stupid elements but it's a good story, the protagonist really is heroic, and it's got some beautiful, beautiful dogsledding scenes.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Don't think you are going to conceal faults by concealing evidence that they ever existed. Dwight D Eisenhower
But, the Belgians, with proper coat anyway, don't seem to have much of an issue with the clinging snowballs.

I don't think I've ever had snow cling to my Siberians' coats, even when snowshoeing in deep, wet snow. They have amazing coats.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Don't think you are going to conceal faults by concealing evidence that they ever existed. Dwight D Eisenhower
But, the Belgians, with proper coat anyway, don't seem to have much of an issue with the clinging snowballs.

I don't think I've ever had snow cling to my Siberians' coats, even when snowshoeing in deep, wet snow. They have amazing coats.

Boomer comes in from outside with a couple of inches of snow on his back and just strolls through the house like that. He usually thinks of shaking himself off when standing right next to a partially-clad human.
Mustang Sally
My favorite sledding movie, hands down, is "Iron Will." It has stupid elements but it's a good story, the protagonist really is heroic, and it's got some beautiful, beautiful dogsledding scenes.

i'll second that.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com /
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