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No, I know what whippets are. They're not tiny dogs, but I do think ofthem as small.

Different perceptions, then- Morag is Whippet-sized (as well as Whippet-shaped under her coat), and I can't imagine her being described as a small dog.
And I'll try a GL first.

IMO- and this is based on handling a dog who was (and still occasionally is) prone to sudden lunges at the sight of prey- a GL on a sighthound is a prescription for disaster.
I just don't see a prong collar as the first tool of choice with a dog like a whippet.

Nobody said it was "the tool of first choice"; rather, it was stated that under certain circumstances it could be a useful tool with some. Obviously, Frank's friend finds one so.
Howdy All,
In the open field events if there are 20 dogs at a mixed hunt (Borzoi, Whips, Greys and Salukis and sometimes one of the other sighthounds) about 15 dogs will be on choke collars. The main reason is to prevent back-slips. A real no-no in the field is the regular buckle on collar. You will end up with a loose dog.
Frank X. Morris
http://community.webtv.net/Sulkhalil/SalukiCornerChime
Howdy All, In the open field events if there are 20 dogs at a mixed hunt (Borzoi, Whips, Greys and ... A real no-no in the field is the regular buckle on collar. You will end up with a loose dog.

What about martingales? I use that with Kizzi at coursing - she is a manic on line - but is still deferring a bit in the field (If another dog is right on the lure she will sort of stand off and course off a bit.

Melissa S. Frye
Skyrocket cockers www.mfrye.com/skyrocket/
What about martingales? I use that with Kizzi at coursing - she is a manic on line -

They're fairly widely used for Jack Russells, for similar reasons- if you want to see going nuts, watch JRTs waiting to do Go-to-Ground. Rocsi has an absolutely gorgeous hand-made wide cloth martingale, purchased at the JRTCA Nationals.
Howdy Melissa,
I have seen them and more of them show up each year. One of our open field cousing people makes them and mechanical slip leads . The slip leads are the single dog variation of the brace slip lead used in OFC in England. Over there they have a "handler" slip a brace of dogs to course the hare.
My first 2 Salukis were lure coursing champions back in the early to mid 80's. It was fun but I enjoy the open field much more.

Frank X. Morris
http://community.webtv.net/Sulkhalil/SalukiCornerChime
My first 2 Salukis were lure coursing champions back in the early to mid 80's. It was fun but I enjoy the open field much more.

I would love to do open field but living in VA not any chance around here.

I doubt Kizzi will ever be a FC - she is a submissive dog and won't challange another dog for a lure. So she will back off the lure if another dog is coursing hard - she still follows but not with the intensity she has when she runs alone.

Melissa S. Frye
Skyrocket cockers www.mfrye.com/skyrocket/
Thanks to all of you for your input.
The prong collar issue is on a project
for whippets.
All comments, and concerns noted.
Thanks again.
Thanks to all of you for your input.
The prong collar issue is on a project
for whippets.
All comments, and concerns noted.
Thanks again.
Their skin certainly is delicate, much like a greyhounds. They have nocoat and the easily torn skin.

Some have more coat and tougher skin (although you probably don't see that type at AKC events much). However, that's why I suggested that anyone thinking of using a prong with a Whippet should invest the extra few dollars in the rubber caps for the prongs.
- plus most
whippets I know are prone to sudden burst when they see somethign andforget they have a lead on.

Morag has done that many a time, especially when I first had her. She has only done it once with a prong on; didn't do any harm or even seem to bother her- in fact, she was so intent on the fox I don't think she even felt the prong.
She does, of course, have a much heavier coat than a Whippet, even a long-haired one. Also, I used a heavy-weight prong with her, and just took out extra links; because the collar is wider, and the prongs thicker, she found it more comfortable.
Having said that- I don't think I'd choose a prong for any sighthound in an outdoor situation, unless it was a very controlled one (e.g. a trial or some such).
In Morag's case, the prong use was temporary- I used it not for training, but because she was recovering from a very nasty case of kennel cough, and needed to have NO pressure whatsoever on her throat. The prong was the only collar that didn't make her cough, even if she pulled on it. (And yes, she pulled on it- she even leaned into it.)