I moved on with my plan to move our birds up to my room/study upstairs so as part of that I adopted another bird. I was torn between a Jenday and a Sun and ended up going with a Sun because I found a really sweat one who had been well taken care of and the family just couldn't keep him any longer.
I was worried about time sharing, but my Green Cheek (Kadin) gets along fairly well with our new Sun (Kama), I kept them apart but in proximity of each other the first two days. Then on the third day we took them both up to our local bird speciality store for grooming. My wife had Kama and I had Kadin, at one point we got close and Kadin flew off my shoulder and on to my wifes arm, he (we finally got his DNA results back, so I can say "he" with confidence) got up next to Kama and starting preening, Kama positioned his neck really enjoyed it. So we let them ride home in the same carrier and we watched them closely, they continued to grrom each other.
I will continue to keep them in seperate cages and monitor all their activities togeaher, but I'm really happy they get along. Also time sharing isn't a problem now because I can keep both of them with me at the same time, although the Green Cheek still demands more attention.
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I moved on with my plan to move our birds up to my room/study upstairs so as part of that ... I can keep both of them with me at the same time, although the Green Cheek still demands more attention.

Sounds great, and congrat's on the new addition. One caution though. When you get a new bird from any source you should always quarantine the new bird until you are sure it is not sick. If you bring home a sick bird that is not yet showing it, then find out later you may have to medicate all the birds, expensive, and you have not lived till you had to try to force antibiotics down a bird twice a day for 10 days. After you do it once you will never want to have to do it again .
Enjoy the new addition!!!

Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. Benjamin Franklin
Sounds great, and congrat's on the new addition. One caution though. When you get a new bird from any source ... If you bring home a sick bird that is not yet showing it, then find out later blah blah blah

Quarantining a new bird is good for one thing and one thing only. It allows people to think that they are actually doing something good for their bird. The reality is that they are actually just wasting the time and effort because there is virtually no chance that what they are doing is actually effective.
ZQ
Quarantining a new bird is good for one thing and one thing only. It allows people to think that they ... wasting the time and effort because there is virtually no chance that what they are doing is actually effective. ZQ

Why would you say this? What do you believe this procedure, done correctly, is not affecting? Do you have some alternative method of protecting healthy stock from the introduction of potentially contaminated stock?

Sincerely,
Joanne
If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

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Quarantining a new bird is good for one thing and ... chance that what they are doing is actually effective. ZQ

Why would you say this? What do you believe this procedure, done correctly, is not affecting? Do you have some ... contaminated stock? Sincerely, Joanne If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

He would say that because this is mick or jynyx, or whatever. Still having "issues" with his parents and crying out for attention.
If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried.
Actually, I'd have to say that he's half-right on this. Most bird illnesses seem to be so well-hidden that you don't even know about them until much later. The only ones that you catch are the ones where the new bird suddenly keels over and blows up like a beachball. The 'obvious symptom' ones.

I'd still recommend the early 'quarantine', though. Even to get the new bird used to you without distractions...
My Avian vet looked our new Sun over and said he looked good and she saw no signs of sickness. She gave her disclaimer about birds hiding sickness and that without running test there isn't a 100% guarantee.

I know where the bird came from, I know he's had a good home and is active, so I decided against isolating him to a different room.
My Avian vet looked our new Sun over and said he looked good and she saw no signs of sickness. ... I know he's had a good home and is active, so I decided against isolating him to a different room.[/nq]It's VERY good that you had the bird looked at by an Avian Vet. Far too many people who own "pets" whether they be birds, Dogs, or Cats think of the "Vet" as something you look for if the animal gets sick. I am a little over protective only because I went through a few 10 day sessions of forcing medicine down the throat of a Macaw. Had nothing to do with contagious disease, but the result is the same. Once you have to do it, you never want to do it again.

The birds fight you every step of the way because the stuff tastes terrible. If I was to get another bird I would definitely have the labs done before I let the new bird near the other birds. To me it's well worth the $250.00 or so, rather than have to medicate all of them later, but that is because I have been through this before. I still have the Vet do labs on our birds every other year just as a "just in case".

If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried.
Why would you say this? What do you believe this procedure, done correctly, is not affecting?

The point is that it can't be done correctly.
Do you have some alternative method of protecting healthy stock from the introduction of potentially contaminated stock?

Nope. It's all a crap shoot.
ZQ
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