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high Wendy

You're welcome.
Maybe, re: other versions. I take a generic (much cheaper than the brand name Sudafed), & these come the way I described, although I've also taken Sudafed itself & the 30 mg tabs are the same little round brittle coated tablets.
Cathy

"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
She will call me later from the
Thanks to you and all for the input. I also think 30 mgs is too high for a 6 pound ... only contains pseudoepherine HCl as Wendy mentioned. My vet closes at 1 on Saturdays, so I really appreciate the input.[/nq]That really does sound like huge dosage for a cat, although I am sometimes surprised at the "carry-over" of medications between people and cats. I tried to look it up in "The Pill Book Guide to Medication for Your Dog and Cat," but there was no reference under either spelling. Then I checked in the "Complete Guide to Prescription and Nonprescription Drugs" (by H. Winter Griffith, M.D. obviously intended for people and not cats). According to that book, the tablet can be crushed (but not the timed-release tablet, which must be taken whole).

Overdose can result in a variety of symptoms, including nervousness, irregular heartbeat, tremors, convulsions, trembling, difficult urination, and seizures (rare). All of this information pertains to people, of course, and not to cats; but I would certainly want to ask some pointed questions, especially considering the fact that this is the same vet who "accidentally" declawed the cat. (Incidentally, I do hope he is providing follow-up care free of charge!)
MaryL
The dose prescribed sounds awfully high and I wouldn't be inclined to trust the vet.
I would stay away from that.
When I had a congested cat it was prescribed children's neo-synephrine nasal drops (which is .025% IIRC) at one drop in each nostril twice a day for 2-3 days. It shouldn't be used for longer than that but that should be enough. Using a very warm damp compress on the kitten's nose beforehand will loosen up and help to drain the sinus and should be done before administering the nosedrops. URI's are often herpes related, so adding 250-500 mg a day of Lysine (get the capsule form and mix the powder in with some babyfood or canned food) will also help.

Megan
"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."
-Edmund Burke
Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com
Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.picturetrail.com/zuzu22
"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his way."
- W.H. Murray
My friend's vet told her to give her eight-month-old kitten 30 mgs of regular Pseudofed for her respiratory congestion. He ... humans to their cats? Needless to say I do not feel inclined to trust this particular vet's advice. Thank you.

Nope, never. But I have only had limited experience with URIs in cats. An old fashioned steam bath comes to mind for this. Just fill the bathroom with steam 2x per day and sit with kitty in there for about 10 minutes. This I have done.
I just checked with my vet clinic and they only list dosages for dogs, and the vet said she would not prescribe Sudafed for cats. Given that, I would definitely not trust the vets prescribed dose and would look at other options. 30 mg is half the dose an average 125-175 pound human would take. Giving that to a 6 pound cat goes beyond the bounds of common sense.
Megan
"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."
-Edmund Burke
Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com
Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.picturetrail.com/zuzu22
"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his way."
- W.H. Murray
I did run across a web page online discussing giving people medicine to animals. It discussed Pseudofed. Said it wasn't tolerated well by dogs but made no reference to cats.
"Some categories of OTC medications that your vet may instruct you to purchase and use in your pet include certain antihistamines, aspirin, antacid medications, and some types of cough suppressants.

CRITICAL POINT: Just because a medication is available over the counter does not make it safe to your for your pet! Never use any medication without the explicit instructions of your veterinarian.
Here are a couple of glaring examples of why unauthorized use of OTC medication in your pet can be dangerous:

1.) Tylenol: generically known as acetaminophen. In high doses or withchronic use, acetaminophen can be toxic to a dog's liver. For cats, even small doses are deadly. Never, ever give Tylenol or any medication containing acetaminophen to a cat.
2.) Pseudoephedrine: Many of the common cold, flu, and allergy medicationscontain decongestants like pseudoephedrine. Pseudofed, it is commonly known, can be toxic to dogs. Often pseudofed is a secondary ingredient and people don't read far enough down the label to realize it is present. Never give any over-the-counter cold or allergy medication without talking to your veterinarian."
http://www.petphones.com/segments/tips/
Wendy
Thanks to you and all for the input. I also think 30 mgs is too high for a 6 pound ... only contains pseudoepherine HCl as Wendy mentioned. My vet closes at 1 on Saturdays, so I really appreciate the input.[/nq]That really does sound like huge dosage for a cat, although I am sometimes surprised at the "carry-over" of medications between people and cats. I tried to look it up in "The Pill Book Guide to Medication for Your Dog and Cat," but there was no reference under either spelling. Then I checked in the "Complete Guide to Prescription and Nonprescription Drugs" (by H. Winter Griffith, M.D. obviously intended for people and not cats). According to that book, the tablet can be crushed (but not the timed-release tablet, which must be taken whole).

Overdose can result in a variety of symptoms, including nervousness, irregular heartbeat, tremors, convulsions, trembling, difficult urination, and seizures (rare). All of this information pertains to people, of course, and not to cats; but I would certainly want to ask some pointed questions, especially considering the fact that this is the same vet who "accidentally" declawed the cat. (Incidentally, I do hope he is providing follow-up care free of charge!)
MaryL
My friend's vet told her to give her eight-month-old kitten 30 mgs of regular Pseudofed for her respiratory congestion.

Human dose is 60 mg. 30 mg is a lot for a cat. My vet recommended some over the counter baby allergy tablets cut in half for my cat. I forget what it was but it worked fine.
My friend's vet told her to give her eight-month-old kitten 30 mgs of regular Pseudofed for her respiratory congestion. He ... humans to their cats? Needless to say I do not feel inclined to trust this particular vet's advice. Thank you.[/nq]Well, I think she should not give the cat any drug without a prescription even if it is an over the counter medication. If this thing kills the cat, the vet can deny prescribing it afterwards. What is the dosage recommended for an adult? Does it say how much should be given in body weight or just a general dosage? If it´s general, the weight considered is the "average human weight", that is, 70kgs. If that kitten is 0.5 kg, she weighs 1/140 of the weight of an adult human.

So you should get the dose prescribed for an adult human and divide it by 140. Ideally, your friend should look up if this drug is ok to be ministered for cats and what the usual dosage is. I did a quick Google search and could not find any page recommending its use for cats. I did some reading on this drug and I would definitively not give it to any of my cats. I agree that changing vets is a must here.
1 kg = 2.2 pounds

Here´s something interesting about Pseudofed:
Sale of drug ingredients to be limited
By Bridget Carter
Tough new rules affecting the sale of the chemicals that can make methamphetamine are about to be introduced by police and the drug industry.
Richard Schurr, of the police National Drug Intelligence Bureau, said a meeting in Auckland this month with groups such as Medsafe, the Pharmacy Guild and the Non-Prescription Medicine Association was partly in response to directions by the United Nations to create international protocols and conventions over trading chemical products.
While no one will reveal details of the options to be considered, the Herald has been told that methods used in Australia that restrict the sale of drugs will be considered.
Across the Tasman, the popular cold drug Pseudofed cannot be sold in packets of 60 or 90 tablets.
The product contains pseudoephedrine, the substance used to make methamphetamine, or speed.
The smaller packets are kept out of easy reach and must be dispensed by a pharmacist.
Australian National Drugs Strategic Unit spokesman, Steve Vaughan, said the company Pfizer had agreed to stop selling the large Pseudofed packets in Australia nearly 18 months ago.
Some pharmacists asked for photo identification before they sold anything containing pseudoephedrine.
For the past five years, the Australian pharmaceutical industry has had a code of conduct restricting who can buy certain substances, preventing them from being paid for in cash and requiring that courier companies deliver them to specified business addresses.

Mr Vaughan said the rules were working, but a difficult area to control was the sale of substances through the internet. Australian methamphetamine manufacturers had bought the chemicals for speed on international websites, including New Zealand sites.

"If you go on international sites it is quite widely advertised."

Mr Schurr said methamphetamine, a highly addictive stimulant that works on the central nervous system, first came to notice in New Zealand during the early 1990s, and the first methamphetamine laboratory in this country was found near Timaru in 1996.

Last year, police discovered 41 laboratories, compared with nine in
2000. Some were located in car boots or in bathrooms.

Most were found from Hamilton northwards.
The drug bureau says the trade can provide manufacturers and suppliers with vast profits.
Those involved can turn chemicals worth a few hundred dollars into $200,000 in just a few days.
On the street, speed sells for up to $100 a gram.
It is made out of ephedrine, which comes from a plant, but can also be made synthetically and is mixed with other substances.

Most chemicals to make the drug come from organised groups of shoppers, paid by the methamphetamine cooks to travel around pharmacies until they have bought hundreds of tablets containing pseudoephedrine.
Mr Schurr said companies had to be licensed to buy the chemicals used to make speed but there were ways around it.
He said New Zealand needed ways to address the problem with drugs being sold to make speed.
But there needed to be room for people to still go about their business.
David Jones, a spokesman for the Pharmacy Guild, said there were 42 products sold in pharmacies that contained substances used to make speed. Examples were Actifed and Telfast. Pharmacists would be suspicious of anyone who bought more than one packet of these drugs.

Pharmacies had been exposed to burglaries and raids and staff had been put under a lot of pressure to sell them, he said.

Auckland pharmacies the Herald spoke to were not stocking cold-tablet type products in packs of more than 30 tablets and had a policy of asking for identification and restricting sales.
Products containing codeine, such as Panadol, are available in packs of up to 100 tablets but are usually held behind the pharmacy counter. The smaller cold-treatment packs are often on open shelves.

NZ Herald - 1 April 2002
My friend's vet told her to give her eight-month-old kitten 30 mgs of regular Pseudofed for her respiratory congestion. He ... humans to their cats? Needless to say I do not feel inclined to trust this particular vet's advice. Thank you.

Well that doesn't sound right at ALL. That's a human dosage! Man, this woman needs a different vet. Try steaming the bathroom up. She could even run a vaporizer if she has one.
Karen
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