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It doesn't always work that simply.

True, sometimes a cat is more resistant to a pharmaceutical than we are but usually it´s the other way around. As omnivores, we have a more robust liver than a cat since our natural diet is much more varied.
For ex., one of my cats used to take a medication (Actigall) which came in 300 mg capsules - for ... remember) of a human/adult tablet. IOW, it was not in direct proportion weight-wise, as one may guess it to be.

Vets may get right substances that are prescribed to cats often but that does not mean they know how to dose a substance that is not usually prescribed. A long time ago my cat had some sort of generalized mycosis and the vet prescribed 100mg of Nizoral daily for3 months. Nizoral had just reached the market. The dosage for a humanis from 100mg to 400mg, depending on what fungus it´s supposed to treat and how long it´s to be taken. Before I gave any of it to the cat, I wrote to Johnson&Johnson to ask if they had any data on its use for cats and what proper dosage should be. They sent me a big stack of papers with all the info on the drug, dosing, and how to prepare the proper dose. The correct dose in this case is 3mg/kg of body weight.

My cat weighed 5kgs, so the proper dose for him was 15mg. To prepare that dose, I had to crush the tablet, mix it with 10ml of water and dilute acid (to make the drug dissolve), and give 0.75ml daily and keep the mixture in the refrigerator. This specific drug is very toxic to the liver. If I had given 100mg/day as prescribed, for three months as prescribed, I´d probably have killed the cat. I remember a Dutch guy whose vet prescribed 200mg of Nizoral to his cat.

The cat died within a month or less, can´t remember now. It´s in this newsgroup so you might find the original msg if you do a search on Nizoral on this specific newsgroup.Each pharmaceutical has the correct way of "dosing down" and you will only get that info from the company. Some can´t be dosed down at all because the capsule is prepared to be open, for example, only in the intestines. If the drug gets to the stomach, it may cause an ulcer for instance or be completely destroyed by the acids in the stomach. I´ve seen a human doctor prescribe one of these pharmaceuticals with a special capsule and tell the client to take only half of it by openning the capsule and taking only half of the powder inside.

Just to give the full info, some pharmaceuticals are sensitive to light and some are destroyed by oxygen. So if one has to dose down, the remaining portion should be discarded. I do not know how pharmaceuticals are marketed there but here there´s a small report on the drug inside the box. This report gives all this information but some people trust their doctors & vets so much that they don´t even read it. And if they do read it, they believe that the doctor knows better than the company that developed and tested the drug and this is never true.

Many pharmaceuticals are also sold as liquids so those are easy to "dose down."
As to below, I've been taking Sudafed - or more often its generic - for years on end for allergies, ... the last year or so, & personally, I think the semi-flap over its use as a decongestant is overblown. Cathy

You´re taking the medication. Some people were probably buying the drug to make speed or taking it in excess to get high. That´s the difference. Emotion: smile
IMO if he couldn't do it right the first time, I would not trust him a second time. MLB

Agreed. I can just picture the guy telling the girl that he had told her to give the cat three* mg and not *thirty mg.
It does seem high as the human dose is 60 mg. However, the cat dose of valium is 2.5 mg, while the human dose range starts at 5.0 mg. So these things cannot always be scaled due to differences in metabolism between cats and humans.

And mainly difference in the drugs themselves. Valium is quickly metabolized and it´s a drug that acts indirectly, like many psychiatric drugs. You´d probably need a huge dose to get overdose symptoms. If you experiment giving the cat 0.5mg of Valium you might discover that it works just as nicely and save yourself some money. Take a B vitamin as example. You can give the cat the same dose as you would take because any excess is quickly eliminated - in this case, it doens´t even need to be metabolized. It´s eliminated as is.
circa 16 Nov 2003 04:42:16 -0800, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav, Liz (Email Removed) said,
Some people were probably buying the drug to make speed or taking it in excess to get high

Anybody taking pseudoephedrine in excess to get high is in for a big surprise. High dosages of pseudoephedrine have very unpleasant side effects.
Laura

Quoting: The act of repeating erroneously the words of another. Ambrose Bierce
Perhaps, but in this case these doses were correct - the vet double-checked w/ both the vets' version of the PDR (I don't remeber what its title is) & with the internist who was working w/ us on this cat's case.
As to below, I've been taking Sudafed - or more ... think the semi-flap overits use as a decongestant is overblown.

You´re taking the medication. Some people were probably buying the drug to make speed or taking it in excess to get high. That´s the difference. Emotion: smile

I'm glad that, so far, some idiots aren't restricting others' use of it as a medication at the proper dosage here.
Cathy

"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
I suppose the dosage for a cat would depend on the way they metabolize it. I have no clue but there are obviously differences between people and animals or there wouldn't be the problem there is with Tylenol and the like. There are differences between cats and dogs for that matter as dogs can tolerate certain meds that would be deadly for a cat and vice verse. I wonder if they have a PDR for animals or would that be a VDR?
Wendy
circa Sat, 15 Nov 2003 15:06:45 -0500, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav, Wendy (Email Removed) said,
They sell various products under the pseudofed name

It's the other way around- pseudoephedrine is sold under various brand names (Sudafed being the most well-known).
Pseudoephedrine/pseudofed is always pseudoephedrine HCL. What is important is that if* pseudoephedrine is given (and I'm still not sure that it should be given to a cat), it needs to be a drug that is not billed as being used for multiple symptoms (such as headache and congestion). Those drugs contain pseudoephedrine *plus things such as acetominophen.
Plain Sudafed is pseudoephedrine HCL and nothing else.

With that said, 30mg sounds like much, much too high a dose to me. I take a prescription that contains 120mg pseudoephedrine, which is a high dose for a human- OTC pseudoephedrine dosage is half that. While I'm not a large person, I'm certainly more than four times the weight of the average cat. I would think that 10mg would even be high for an animal weighing ten pounds or so. Three* mg sounds a lot more reasonable than *thirty to me (again, if it's indicated for cats at all).
Laura

How do people go to sleep? I'm afraid I've lost the knack. ...I might repeat to myself, slowly and soothingly, a list of quotations beautiful from minds profound;
if I can remember any of the damn things.
-Dorothy Parker
I suppose the dosage for a cat would depend on the way they metabolize it.I have no clue but there ... for a cat and vice verse. I wonder ifthey have a PDR for animals or would that be a VDR?

Yes, they do - I've seen my vet consult it, but I don't remember what it's called.
Cathy

"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
Too much and you get rebound swelling?
Wendy
circa 16 Nov 2003 04:42:16 -0800, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav, Liz (Email Removed) said,
Some people were probably buying the drug to make speed or taking it in excess to get high

Anybody taking pseudoephedrine in excess to get high is in for a big surprise. High dosages of pseudoephedrine have very unpleasant side effects.
Laura

Quoting: The act of repeating erroneously the words of another. Ambrose Bierce
That happens w/ nasal decongestant sprays, but my guess here is diarrhea, since one's system would be 'jumped up'. Don't know if I'm right or not...

Cathy

"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
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