Hi all first post here,
The wife bought me a lab puppy 6 weeks old.. She is cute as all get out.. The question I have is this.. She is completely oblivious to everything.. Calling her name, whistles etc.. So much so that we thought for a bit she may be deaf.. However, I've seen her get distracted by noise of a squirrel while taking her out.. and she will look around if she hears a bottle of Advil shaken.. Is this normal? Is there something to do to teach her to respond? My wife thinks its because the breeder kept her outside with like
7 other puppies and she is desensitized to noise.. That sound right?

Thanks
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Hi all first post here, The wife bought me a lab puppy 6 weeks old.. She is cute as all ... hears a bottle of Advil shaken.. Is this normal? Is there something to do to teach herto respond?

www.clickertraining.com you can start training puppies at 4 weeks, maybe even sooner. Right now, she isn't coming in contact with consequences of responding to the noises that you use to get her attention. Learning clicker training will dramatically help you (and more than with just your puppy). The clicker is not used to get her attention, but used to bridge (in time) her responses to the consequences of her responses. I recommend getting a clicker video and buying Karen Pryor's book Don't Shoot the Dog.
My wife thinks its because the breeder kept her outside with like
Hi all first post here, The wife bought me a lab puppy 6 weeks old.. She is cute as all ... because the breeder kept her outside with like 7 other puppies and she is desensitized to noise.. That sound right?

Your pup's hearing is still developing, but she sounds okay to me. If she hears the squirrel, etc., she's probably just fine.

You need to get her to a vet now anyway, and while you're there, he or she can help you ascertain if you have anything to worry about.

Ask the vet to also recommend a good puppy OBEDIENCE school for you, because it's never too early to get started with TRAINING your pup. Because in about 6-7 months you'll very very glad that you did.

Good luck to you and your pup!

Handsome "Jack" Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
Q: Because it reverses the logical flow of conversation. A: Why is top posting frowned upon?
Ask the vet to also recommend a good puppy OBEDIENCE school for you, because it's never too early to get started with TRAINING your pup. Because in about 6-7 months you'll very very glad that you did.

Just keep in mind that most puppy classes don't take pups younger than
16 weeks old, but you can start training at home at this age. Justremember that she's just a baby and doesn't know anything about human rules (or language), and as such, it is your job to teach her so that she knows what your expectations of her are. For example, she most likely isn't responding to her name, because she doesn't know that it's her name, and that she's expected to respond to it in a certain way. Puppies don't generally have much by the way of an attention span either, so keep your training sessions short, fun, and positive.

There is a lot of good information about puppy training at sites such as these:
http://www.perfectpaws.com/pupstuff.html
http://www.dogdaysusa.com/puppy101.asp
http://www.clickersolutions.com/articles/index.htm#puppy

Suja
Hi all first post here, The wife bought me a lab puppy 6 weeks old.. She is cute as all ... because the breeder kept her outside with like 7 other puppies and she is desensitized to noise.. That sound right?

I don't think she is desensitized to noise - she just hasn't learned that your voice means good things yet. Try using treats to connect your voice to good things. Say puppypuppypuppypuppy and wave a treat under her nose. When her head turns towards the treat (and towards you) give her the treat. GOOD PUPPY.
You might use her name instead of "puppy".

BethF, Anchorage, AK
It's YOUR God.
They are YOUR rules.
YOU burn in hell.
The question I have is this.. She is completely oblivious to everything.. Calling her name, whistles etc..

Whatever she's engaged in is more interesting to her than the noises you're making. You can change that.
Very often - like 30 times a day - call her name in a high-pitched, cheerful voice. If she looks at you, say "Yes!" and give her a treat. If she doesn't look at you, don't keep repeating the name. Instead, go over to her and make some noises that will get her to look up at you. Every time you get eye contact, say "Yes!" and give her a treat. Keep doing this until you get eye contact every time you say her name.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
Just keep in mind that most puppy classes don't take pups younger than 16 weeks old

PetsMart starts them at 10 weeks. I was suggesting to students that they wait until 12 weeks, since there seems to be a distinct difference in attention span within those 2 weeks. But talking to a trainer of therapy dogs who starts them at 7 weeks changed my mind. Even though they don't retain the training as well at a young age, it's an advantage to get them learning how to learn as young as possible.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
PetsMart starts them at 10 weeks.

Really? I'm surprised. Is it a good idea to take puppies who haven't completed their vaccine series and put them on potentially germie infested surfaces?
I was suggesting to students that they wait until 12 weeks, since there seems to be a distinct difference in ... as well at a young age, it's an advantage to get them learning how to learn as young as possible.

Teaching them, and getting them to understand the concept of training is one thing. Exposing them to a potentially dangerous situation that could seriously jeopardize their health is quite another. I think that young puppies should have exposure to all sorts of different things, but it should be handled in a responsible manner. I would never recommend that a pup that young be taken to a pet store - or at least walked around in one. We've had people bring their 8 week old puppies to the dog park (rule is that they should be 16 weeks old), and these people have always been informed of the risks they're taking.

Suja
Teaching them, and getting them to understand the concept of training is one thing. Exposing them to a potentially dangerous ... that they should be 16 weeks old), and these people have always been informed of the risks they're taking. Suja

I totally agree. Though it was sort of the downside of Blade as I waited until he had completed his series of vaccines until taking him to training or places with other dogs. In some ways it was a mistake as I certainly feel had he been constantly exposed to various dogs since the day I got him he might not have been leash dog aggressive like he is. But there is NO doubt
there is risks to puppies being exposed at such
a young age. Especially to Parvo.
Gwen
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