I'm trying to quickly figure out what the heck we're supposed to do with puppies over the holidays in potentially deep (for puppies) snow.

I'm reading about stages of development, and came across this: (http://www.ccc.govt.nz/animals/CriticalPuppyDevelopment.asp)

"The optimum time for taking a puppy into a new household is at the end of the seventh week and the beginning of the puppy's fourth critical period."
I thought we were supposed to keep pups for eight weeks for optimal socialization with other dogs.
We've never had puppies to raise to 7 or 8 weeks.

Does anyone have any good links about what we should be doing with these puppies to get them on the right track? What are we supposed to do with these little fur blobs?
I'm looking at dogplay.com & I'm not seeing any "So You Have Baby Puppies" articles!
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I'm trying to quickly figure out what the heck we're supposed to do with puppies over the holidays in potentially deep (for puppies) snow.

What we do for chihuahuas? We shovel paths in the snow for them. AKA *** paths.
I know nothing about raising puppies from birth, and I wish you and your litter the best!
FurPaw

Better dead than Red.
To reply, unleash the dog.
We've never had puppies to raise to 7 or 8 weeks.

I am so far out of active breeding and raising puppies that my knowledge is pretty abstract. However,
In Pennsylvania, for instance, it is illegal to sell a puppy before 8 weeks.

There is, I am told, a "fear period" for all puppies and it may vary according to breed. This is a critical time and occurances during that time can have lasting effects. I'm sure there is information out there about this period and how to handle it.
Does anyone have any good links about what we should be doing with these puppies to get them on the right track? What are we supposed to do with these little fur blobs?

Our breeder is my best guidance for this. Puppies get handled from the time they are born. A lot. And then a lot more. She keeps puppies until at least 13 weeks (which gets them past that fear period and, for schnauzers, gets their ears cropped) and believes that they benefit tremendously from the additional time with her pack of dogs. By 7 or 8 weeks old, they are barely walking steadily and seeing and starting to play. It takes the additional time for them to learn to be dogs - which they learn best from other dogs.
As much as I can see that our dogs benefitted from this, I've never had any problem in my past life with getting puppies at 8 weeks. But then, we do a LOT of socializing with a puppy - which is also what the breeder does, and probably better.
Good luck
Judy
I'm trying to quickly figure out what the heck we're supposed to do with puppies over the holidays in potentially deep (for puppies) snow.

What we do for chihuahuas? We shovel paths in the snow for them. AKA *** paths. I know nothing about raising puppies from birth, and I wish you and your litter the best! FurPaw Better dead than Red. To reply, unleash the dog.==

We do that for our big dogs as well. We snow blow a large area and many pathways around the yard.
I'm trying to quickly figure out what the heck we're supposed to do with puppies over the holidays in potentially deep (for puppies) snow. We've never had puppies to raise to 7 or 8 weeks.

Many states have 8 week old laws. As far as snow? You shovel! Build a canopy! Having had to do this so an adult dog could go in the yard (3' of accumulated snow), even though the patio had FAR less snow (but there's patio under there - I can't go THERE!), it's just something we do..

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Many states have 8 week old laws. As far as snow? You shovel!

I'm pretty sure Ohio is one of those states. And I can shovel the patio, but to get out to the back yard, you have to step down and then up to get to the potty area. Baby puppies will never be able to make those steps - plus the whelping area is on the second floor, so I have to figure out a method to carry five puppies down & outside. I'd better find a big basket!
How will I know when we should start them outside? Do you start during or after the weaning process? Will this become obvious?
Shovel for puppies and infirm dogs, but one of the things I look forward to after a heavy snow fall is seeing Cubbe swim through it. She seems to enjoy it too. She sort of pounces and sinks, turns and floats. It is hard to describe. Eventually she has enough footing to pee which melts the snow, which gives her more room.
Lia
I'm trying to quickly figure out what the heck we're ... never had puppies to raise to 7 or 8 weeks.

Many states have 8 week old laws. As far as snow? You shovel! Build a canopy! Having had to do ... snow (but there's patio under there - I can't go THERE!), it's just something we do.. Janet Boss www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com==

I heard not to remove pups from their mother sooner than eight weeks also. Here is an article I have regarding pups.
Age to take Puppy Home
What is the right age to take a puppy home?
8 weeks is the minimum age pups should leave for new homes. Puppiesgo through five critical periods...and it's very important that they remain with their mother and littermates until 7-1/2 to 8 weeks of age.
1. During the first 3 weeks of life puppies have next to no mentalcapacity and their basic needs are provided by their mother. Little or no handling by humans is required (assuming all is well with mother and puppies). But handling at this time will go a long way in development of the pups.
2. About the 4th week puppies become aware of other living beingsand have very slight trainability. This is an extremely critical period and puppies should not be removed from their mother or littermates. Introduction to humans should be started but carefully controlled.
3. Weeks 5 through 7 they begin socialization within the litterand also with humans. At this point they are capable of responding to voices and to recognize people. Training by their mother is in progress and they are becoming aware of the differences between human and canine socialization.
4. During the 8th through 12 weeks puppies are removed fromlittermates and mother. They require human socialization, love and security. Play with children should be well supervised. They are capable of learning simple training such as Come-Sit-Stay-No. It is important that children or other animals not injure puppy either accidentally or maliciously. Introduction to people is important but should be closely supervised. Gradually expose to loud noises such as autos, washing machine, vacuum, etc. Puppy Kindergarten classes during this time are very important.
5. At 13-16 weeks puppy's mental capacity is fully developed andneeds experience. During this time puppy needs love, attention, socialization, discipline and security. Puppy will also try to establish itself as the dominant one. Your puppy is now capable of undergoing formal obedience training and can adopt a good or bad (positive or negative) attitude about training so please select your trainer with great care! Praise and reward for correct behavioral response will go a long way in training your puppy!

It's really important for a puppy to remain with it's mother and littermates as outlined above. During this time your puppy will learn about pack heirarchy, bite inhibition and proper social behavior within the pack. Taking a puppy home before 7-1/2 to 8 weeks of age really deprives the puppy of much needed training by mom and littermates and will make your job of training much more difficult.
I'm trying to quickly figure out what the heck we're supposed to do with puppies over the holidays in potentially ... fourth critical period." I thought we were supposed to keep pups for eight weeks for optimal socialization with other dogs.

This is a nice and intelligent article about the 7 week thing: http://my.execpc.com/~crzy1ess/49daymyth.htmThe nice thing about clicker training is that the puppies can learn several cues as soon as they are old enough to hear and move with some coordination. I also do a lot of handling - putting my fingers in mouths, manipulating toes and handling ears. Teach them to accept gentle restraint and with baby puppies (I('m guessing these guys are a bit older) I hold them in all sorts of positions - head down, on back, swing them gently - put them on slightly warm surfaces, slightly cool surfaces, different textures.

This stuff I do before eyes are even open. Enrich their environement - lots of objects to explore with their eyes, ears, nose and paws (one of my last litter's :toys" - a couple of years ago - was a metal utility scent article), different surfaces - slick, rough, an x-pen panel for them to walk across. The more stuff they experience young, the less scary things will be in their world. Also, be sure each puppy gets human time away from the other puppies.

You can start crate training, and with the last litter I trained them to a litter box (crate pan with "Woody Pet" from Tractor Supply. (I started with the more expensive dog litter that has an attractant) The litter is more the texture of outside than pads or papers. And kept the puppy pen SO clean. First thing those babies would do on waking was scramble for their litter box. Not one puppy ever went anywhere else in the pen. And when you are ready to house train - just scatter a little used litter in the area you want them to eliminate.

BroomSandy
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