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Many of us have said that a dog should have access to fresh water at all times. I agree with that in spirit but can think of so many exceptions that I have to butt in.

I don't think that anybody's suggesting that you should chuck common sense. I'm not sure what that has to do with someone restricting a young puppy's water access to under a minute a day.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

"A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds" Ralph Waldo Emerson
Many of us have said that a dog should have ... of so many exceptions that I have to butt in.

I don't think that anybody's suggesting that you should chuck common sense. I'm not sure what that has to do with someone restricting a young puppy's water access to under a minute a day.

Natural thread drift. I changed the subject line. Lia
First of all, my dog is not neglected. I haven't been away from her for more than 4 hours since ... walks a day. She socializes about an houra day with other dogs of similar size and age in the neighborhood.

If you only allow that little amount of water each day, than yes your dog is neglected.
I spoken to several other puppy owners in the neighborhood, and peeingthat many times is not normal for a 4 ... 4 hrs). Asfor water in the crate, I have read both that they should and shouldn't. Myvet said not to.

Áll puppies are different, they ain't made from cookie cutters. Some go more, some less.
There is also nothing wrong with crate training. I've done plenty of research, and most if not all of it ... I was told to even crate her on the weekends when I'm home so thatshe becomes accustomed to a routine.

No one said there was anything wrong with crate training.
I guess asking this forum for help has been anything but.

You've been offered help. Get the pup to a vet and start offering more fresh water. 40 seconds of drinking time a day is cruel. Fresh water should be available at all times, except when crated. Taking a 4 month old pup outside to potty a dozen times a day or so is pretty normal. So again, you've been offered help.
Natural thread drift. I changed the subject line.

I'm still not sure about the common sense part - that is to say, that people wouldn't use common sense about what "have water always available means." Also, about your comment about having water always available when out for walks: I don't wire a water bowl around their necks, but I do stop every hour or so to water the dogs when we're out hiking.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

"A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds" Ralph Waldo Emerson
Also, about your comment about having water always available when out for walks: I don't wire a water bowl around their necks, but I do stop every hour or so to water the dogs when we're out hiking.

Sooner, depending on the time, place, weather, terrain, etc. Most of our hiking in Shenandoahs involve serious elevation change, and when we hike in summer, we tend to bring LOTS of water, stop frequently for breaks (especially on the uphill part), and cool off in streams that we come across. I don't think I can gauge how hot Khan gets by how hot I am. I'm not exactly walking around with a comforter wrapped around me.

Plain old regular walks lasting less than an hour, we may stop for one or two breaks if it is really hot. The beasts are fine, as long as they get water when we get back to the car.
Suja
I have a four month old beagle puppy that I've had for two months now. For the past month, she ... that when she goes out, she pees right away and she no longer pees without warning. What should I do?

Now I am not a vet (IANAV) nor am I a trainer or someone with great experience with dogs (I have had 2 in my lifetime), but here is my advice.
First of all, I would bring your pup to a vet ASAP. I would also bring a smple of her urine as well so that the vet can test it for infections or something like that.
As for the number of times a day she is peeing, well, she is a puppy, and they pee a lot. The more active they are, the more they will have to pee. The pruduction of urine will slow down (not stop, but slow down) at night or when she is sleeping, but it will still be going on.

Living with a puppy results in a lot of sleepless nights. It is unfortunate, but that is the way it is. As it is, you are lucky. You say that as soon as she goes outside, she pees. Use that to your advantage. At 4 months she should be able to hold it for about 4 hours. TO be on the safe side, take her out every 3.5 hours. When she goes, praise her like she has just discivered the cure to the common cold, give her a small piece of a stinky treat, and then bring her back in and go to sleep. Repeat that all night.
During the day, take her out after she eats. She should go quite soon after that. If she doesn't, bring her inside and then take her out again about 10 minutes later. Keep a very close eye on her in the 10 minute break, she may start to go anytime in there. If she does, interrupt her, and then take her outside immediately to go. Praising he when she goes.

As for the water, I think that it is way too little. When we had our puppy, he had access to water 24 hours a day, even at night. However, I was also taking him for a quick walk every couple of hours at night. Once he hit about 3 months old, he was sleeping in bed with us. He would wake me up in the middle of the night if he had to go by sitting on my chest and licking my face.
What type of food are you feeding her?? (Dry kibble, moist, BARF)

Marcel and Moogli
While its not clear from your post why you restricted water, I gather from the following that it was originally an over-drinking/housebreaking issue:
It has been a few years, and I've been able relax on the schedule a bit and leave her water dish full. She seems to be learning that she needn't drink the whole bowl dry and then ask frantically to go outside (or leak).

To me, this is a huge reason why I don't restrict water (unless there's a medical problem that dictates it). I've seen too many dogs who become obsessed with trying to satisfy their thirst..to the point of gorging on water even when its plentiful. Then, because they are holding more than the body is built for (and far more than their muscles can contain) they end up having an "accident".
I don't know if Cubbe had an underlying condition that led to her overdrinking in the first place, but for the majority of cases, I think its more productive to just let them regulate themselves (except overnights..a person's got to sleep *sometime ). It can take a week or so, but - especially puppies - they tend to get that they don't have to load up all at once. Restricting, imo, tends to spiral the cycle in the wrong direction.
Tara
My current dog will tank up on water that she doesn't need the way other dogs will overeat.

Duke does this, too, but only when someone is home to let him out. Now, being a dog and all, he doesn't understand that sometimes people will be home while he drinks and leave before he needs to pee. That's the only time I call him off the water bowl. Otherwise, the dogs have free access to water 24/7.
...If the day is dry and I'm feeling extra thirsty, I know that she probably is too.

Yet most sports-medicine folks will tell you that you're already dehydrated if you wait until you're thirsty.

Mary H. and the Ames National Zoo:
Raise A Fund, ANZ Babylon Ranger, ANZ MarmaDUKE, and Rotund Rhia
I don't think that anybody's suggesting that you should chuck ... young puppy's water access to under a minute a day.

Natural thread drift. I changed the subject line.

I pretty much give free access.
Interesting point of note. A breeder-who-shall-remain-nameless (not my breed), restricts water on all her dogs. they are given water at limited times a day, and are given limited amounts of water.

The two major effects of this are a) dogs who constantly crave water, and b) dogs who have repeated kidney problems and urinary tract infections.

I know someone who has gotten 2 dogs from this breeder (and no, this person isn't getting a third dog from them). These dogs have completely tanked up on water for the first weeks/months they live with her. Gradually over time and through the constant offering of a large bowl of fresh water at all times, they lose the craving to tank.

Also FWIW, I never restrict my dogs water after exercise. Unlike horses, dogs won't "colic" if given too much water too fast. If they want it, they can have it. Dogs have so few venues to cool themselves and I think water helps. I offer water in my van as soon as we're done with a walk or with work. While we're training, I also offer water at periodic moments. No problems with leaking.
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