Hello everyone,
I have a couple of baby Whites that I purchased not too long ago from the local Petco...
I notice that one of them is feeding a bit better than the other. They are both eating fairly well (will each take a large adult cricket, maybe one every 3-4 days), but one of them seems to have a "better" appetite than the other, and seems to be growing at a faster rate (and is already getting bigger than the other). My question is, should I be concerned about the one who is not eating as much? I thought that generally speaking, a feeding frog is a healthy frog... that the major time to get worried is if they don't eat at all. (I have tons of experience with treefrogs in general, but not specifically with this species yet.)
Thanks much in advance!
I notice that one of them is feeding a bit better than the other. They are both eating fairly well ... don't eat at all. (I have tons of experience with treefrogs in general, but not specifically with this species yet.)

Are they in the same enclosure? The larger one may be the "dominant" one.
On 2006-01-28 14:28:15 -0500, "Chris McMartin"
I notice that one of them is feeding a bit ... treefrogs in general, but not specifically with this species yet.)

Are they in the same enclosure? The larger one may be the "dominant" one.

Yes, they are in the same enclosure but... dominance? In frogs? That young?

Also, it's not as if there is a scarcity of food they will both eat. It is true that usually the bigger one eats first, but it's not as if he prevents the other one from eating...
Yes, they are in the same enclosure but... dominance? In frogs? That young? Also, it's not as if there ... true that usually the bigger one eats first, but it's not as if he prevents the other one from eating...

The larger one doesn't have to physically do anything to the smaller one; the smaller one may perceive the larger as dominant. My turtles seem to fall into this sort of relationship. It would be a relatively simple experiment to put the frogs in separate enclosures for a few weeks and see if there's any improvement in the smaller one's growth.
On 2006-01-31 00:47:19 -0500, "Chris McMartin"
Yes, they are in the same enclosure but... dominance? ... not as if he prevents the other one from eating...

The larger one doesn't have to physically do anything to the smaller one; the smaller one may perceive the larger ... the frogs in separate enclosures for a few weeks and see if there's any improvement in the smaller one's growth.

Hmmm, I'd still be doubtful that it could be a dominance thing though. It's not as if they really interact with each other, or steal food from one another. I guess what I'm worried about is if the smaller one might have parasites, and that explains the slow growth... but on the other hand, he is eating; and I wouldn't have expected that one would have parasites and the other not, since they are sharing water, food, living space, etc.
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the frog may not see it as a dominance factor...but it may see it as a predator. I'm sure the size difference isn't that big, but you never know what's going on in the brains of herps. I'd separate the two for feedings to be sure the little one is getting his fair share.
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the frog may not see it as a dominance factor...but it may see it as a predator. I'm sure the size difference isn't that big, but you never know what's going on in the brains of herps. I'd separate the two for feedings to be sure the little one is getting his fair share. ==
one female, one male, one maybe destined to get MUCH larger than the other one nad quicker, too.
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<<<Yes, I had thought of that too possibly the larger one is female, and the smaller one male.
I don't think they see each other as predators in fact, I believe they are sibs, since they were almost certainly CB and not WC. They do actually seem to get along quite well with each other! (To the extent they actually interact...) They're still both quite small maybe
1.5-2" snout-to-vent, so I'm assuming they are still really babies.How quickly should they grow?
Smaller one is definitely eating. Quite cute when he does sits in one spot in sort of a praying/crouching/expectant position (sort of catlike), then sort of arches his back/lifts himself up when he sees something moving, then pounces... he seems not to have generally the same level of appetite as the bigger one (doesn't eat as frequently and as much as the bigger one), but he still does eat consistently. Other than the possible dominance issues, and as I mentioned, maybe parasites, the only other thing I can think of is that it's just a constitutive difference, that is he just normally has a lesser appetite. I guess this is possible, just as some people have bigger appetites than others...