Heard about this situation at work and was wondering what others would think about it..Someone gives up a dog to a rescue and the dog is placed in a foster home for 2 months. When they give up the dog, they also give the crate, toys, dishes, 6 months of medical supplies (frontline, heartworm, etc), with the stipulation that whoever adopts the dog would get all the stuff too. The person stays in contact with the foster home so they can make sure the dog is fine and see if it got adopted.

The person decides after 2 months that they can't be without the dog any longer and need to get it back. The rescue wants to make them pay an adoption fee and doesn't want to give the person back all the supplies that came with the dog. The person wants her supplies but agrees to pay the fee (basically considering it a "boarding" fee but also because she just really wants her dog back).

What seems like the best or most common way to handle/resolve this?
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What seems like the best or most common way to handle/resolve this?

She's lucky the rescue will even consider adopting the dog back to her. I wouldn't, not unless she had a very, very compelling hard luck story that explained her giving the dog up in the first place.

As to the supplies, she should just write those off and count herself very lucky if they let her adopt that dog back. She may have stipulated that they go to the home that adopted the dog, but the rescue was under no obligation to handle them that way. They will likely use them wherever they are most needed perhaps for dogs in foster care as they should. She can write them off on her taxes if the rescue qualifies as a non-profit.

Lynne
What seems like the best or most common way to handle/resolve this?

She's lucky the rescue will even consider adopting the dog back to her. I wouldn't, not unless she had a very, very compelling hard luck story that explained her giving the dog up in the first place.

Personally, I would consider it, but I'd definitely charge her far more than the adoption fee..because 2 months of boarding costs way more than an adopter would pay.
Keep in mind that adoption fees rarely cover the cost of processing a dog through the rescue system. Just the time it takes acclimating a new dog into a household while watching to make sure they aren't harboring any illnesses is worth more than most groups charge as fees.
As to the supplies, she should just write those off and count herself very lucky if they let her adopt that dog back.

I agree.
I'm amazed if they are only charging her an adoption fee.

I've gotten more than one call from wealthy owners who wanted me to find a "foster home" for their dog while they were renovating their apartment or (in one case) their townhouse. I told them that "foster" means that someone is taking care of the dog for free *with the intention of rehoming the dog*
Otherwise, its called boarding, and the applicable fees are charged.

Tara
What seems like the best or most common way to handle/resolve this?

She's lucky the rescue will even consider adopting the dog back to her. I wouldn't, not unless she had a very, very compelling hard luck story that explained her giving the dog up in the first place.

I am not sure of all the details surrounding the surrender but I think it was based on the owner being injured and not being fair to the dog (not getting the proper time, attention and exercise).
As to the supplies, she should just write those off and count herself very lucky if they let her adopt ... in foster care as they should. She can write them off on her taxes if the rescue qualifies as a non-profit.

As for the supplies, what happening is the rescue ended up giving her a crate for the dog but it was an old junky one instead of her new fancy one. And the other supplies, such as extra medical stuff, etc were never given back. And she did pay the adoption fee (which she never argued about since she agreed it was fair).
As for the supplies, what happening is the rescue ended up giving her a crate for the dog but it ... given back. And she did pay the adoption fee (which she never argued about since she agreed it was fair).

I would have made her fill out an adoption application, which undoubtedly would have been turned down, since she had surrendered a dog. I guess it would really come down to a gut feeling about the person and what was really going on.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Heard about this situation at work and was wondering what others wouldthink about it.. Someone gives up a dog to ... because she just really wants her dog back). What seems like the best or most common way to handle/resolve this?

==The Rescue should not have to return anything to the person. Personally, I would not even return the dog to this person either. Rescue is not about making a profit, but in finding a dog a good stable home. The Rescue people, that I know, do it for the love of the breed or love of dogs in general. The person had to wait two months to think over and decide if he or she really wanted this dog back again?. Rescue people are looking to place dogs in their forever homes; not to be passed around or returned to them, If the person brought the dog to a dog shelter; I would say that is a little different, and I would allow them to adopt the dog for the usual fee, but again no supplies.

But, in this case you state it was a Rescue where they brought the dog, so I would not return the dog or the supplies to this person.
Heard about this situation at work and was wondering what others would think about it.. Someone gives up a dog ... because she just really wants her dog back). What seems like the best or most common way to handle/resolve this?[/nq]With most rescue groups, the owner would have signed a surrender agreement. She would not have had the option to stay in contact with the foster home, and if she wanted the dog back she'd have had to adopt it like anyone else - - application, fee and all. My group usually doesn't use a form because most of the dogs we get are from the track. We've had some owner surrenders of dogs that were not placed by us, and I make clear at the outset that by surrendering the dog, the owner relinquishes all rights including the right to know what happens to the dog.

This is also true when people return dogs adopted from us. Supplies/equipment accompanying a dog are used according to the group's discretion and needs. I might make an exception if a dog were returned or surrendered to us for a really, really good reason, but not surprisingly, that's never happened.

Mustang Sally
We've had some owner surrenders of dogs that were not
placed by us, and I make clear at the outset that by surrendering the dog, the owner relinquishes all rights including the right to know what happens to the dog.

Huh. The schnauzer rescue that covers our area offers followup information to the surrendering party if they want it. I doubt that includes the dog's new location - and since it covers several states, they'd never track it down on their own. They can be sent pictures of the dog in his new home and even an annual newsletter-type of report if they want.

I think what that does is convince people who are giving up their dogs for reasons beyond their control to believe that the dog IS going to find a wonderful new home.
But then, the rescue isn't overwhelmed with dogs.
Judy
We've had some owner surrenders of dogs that were not

placed by us, and I make clear at the outset ... including the right to know what happens to the dog.

Huh. The schnauzer rescue that covers our area offers followup information to the surrendering party if they want it. I ... that the dog IS going to find a wonderful new home. But then, the rescue isn't overwhelmed with dogs. Judy

This might be a good source of revenue for a shelter, to offer such pictures and reports in return for a decent ongoing donation. When someone willingly takes their dog to a shelter for rehoming, they probably really care about the dog. Circumstances may have changed where they can no longer care for it, and they really would like to see their pet in a new, happy place, and wouldn't mind paying for that service.
Paul and Muttley
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