I was curious, of those of you with box turtles, do any of you keep them in a terrarium? If so, were they from the wild? Did you have any trouble with the turtle stopping eating after eating for a couple week/months? Do any of you have them from a captive-hatched, capitve-raised source?
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I was curious, of those of you with box turtles, do any of you keep them in a terrarium? If ... turtle stopping eating after eating for a couple week/months? Do any of you have them from a captive-hatched, capitve-raised source?

Mine:
Wild caught 3-toe and wild caught ornate, had them for 20+ years, keep them outside during the summer. I put them in a fridge for the winter.

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Hi Chris,
What would happen if you didn't put the turtle in the fridge?
Hi Chris, What would happen if you didn't put the turtle in the fridge?

I didn't always brumate my animals. In the winter, sometimes they'd eat less, sometimes there would be little change. It varied from year to year.

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On 15 Oct 2006 15:17:55 -0700 in
(Email Removed), "(Email Removed)" (Email Removed) graced the world with this thought:
I was curious, of those of you with box turtles, do any of you keep them in a terrarium? If ... turtle stopping eating after eating for a couple week/months? Do any of you have them from a captive-hatched, capitve-raised source?

Mine is temporarily in a 50 gal. Rubbermaid bin (until the end of winter). I guess you could say she's from the wild... she was cruising down the sidewalk down the street (urban wildlife) however, since three-toed box turtles aren't indigenous to San Jose, CA, my guess is she's an escapee. I'd heard rumors of a turtle in the neighborhood about a year ago, but now can't find a claimant.
Anyway, she didn't eat for about the first two weeks I had her (she was outside)... but then I picked up some giant mealworms for her had she chowed down on them... since then, no problem getting her to eat... apricots, bananas, celery leaves, radish leaves, sow bugs, wax worms and meal worms. There's very little that she won't at least investigate.
If your turtle is in a cooler climate, days are getting cooler and shorter fast your buddy's clock may be telling him it's time to hibernate... that will slow down their food consumption.
, "Chris McMartin" (Email Removed) graced the world with this thought:
I put them in a fridge for the winter.

lol... I was wondering about that. How cold is your fridge?
I put them in a fridge for the winter.

lol... I was wondering about that. How cold is your fridge?

I'll have to look in my notes I just used a small wine cellar for the first time last winter in order to get more control over the temps. I think I got it down to the mid 40s Fahrenheit. Before, I kept them in my garage which generally stayed in the 50s but fluctuated from around 50 to close to 70. Still, the turtles did not lose much body weight (I still soaked them weekly while in the garage).

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, "Chris McMartin" (Email Removed) graced the world with this thought:
I'll have to look in my notes I just used a small wine cellar for the first time last winter in ... to 70. Still, the turtles did not lose much body weight (I still soaked them weekly while in the garage).

Cool, thanks... I have a fridge in the garage that I don't have quite as cold as the one in the house (probably high to mid forties, I'll have to drop a thermometer in there and see), and I was wondering if putting her in there was feasable. Sounds doable.
Cool, thanks... I have a fridge in the garage that I don't have quite as cold as the one in ... drop a thermometer in there and see), and I was wondering if putting her in there was feasable. Sounds doable.

I was very apprehensive at first. I don't think I'd recommend using an old fridge simply because I wouldn't be able to get the precise temperature control as I can with the wine cellar I suppose just keeping your food cold is not good enough for snooty wine types who want a very narrow temperature range which they can adjust depending on what kind of wine they're keeping inside. Emotion: smile I don't drink much, can you tell?
Anyway, you have to work against the technology found in the cooling device of your choice. Basically, the fridge/wine cellar tries its hardest to dehumidify the air, and you don't want that because it'll be dehumidifying your animals as well.
I bought the little 6-bottle wine cellar that looks more like a microwave oven than a cooling device it has a window on the door and buttons/LCD readout by which you control/monitor the temperature. I think it was around $70 US at Wal-Mart when I bought it. The temperature can be controlled in 1-degree F increments down to 48 degrees, which is where I kept it.

I routed out a groove in the door, such that when the door is completely shut, the groove will just barely permit a standard-size aquarium pump air line to pass into the compartment. I run an aquarium air pump on the outside of the cellar to an air stone placed in a plastic cup of water. This causes a lot of water to collect in the sump at the front of the cellar, which periodically must be checked/drained, but it was sufficient to keep the humidity inside the cellar roughly 60% (measured again thanks to a Wal-Mart digital thermometer/hygrometer, circa $15 US).

I put my two turtles inside a small Rubbermaid container (with a lid, because even at those temps the turtles would occasionally be active, and I had other animals in there I didn't want disturbed) with CareFresh bedding. I sprayed the bedding with water, again to keep the humidity up, and put the whole shebang into the wine cellar. The turtles were in the cellar for 6 weeks and suffered no measurable weight loss (measured by digital postal scale to the nearest tenth of an ounce). After coming out of the cellar and warmed up for a few days, I resumed feeding them.

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