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Since then, I've gotten two budgies. They are certainly a couple of noisy fellows. It doesn't trouble me too much ... place, I would reserve a room for them so that my activities wouldn't interfere. As it is I make do.

Cover them up with a dark cloth at night, and they will have their own "room".
This can help give a 12 hr light/dark cycle which is good for tropical birds.
My budgies have never chewed the paper in the bottom of their cages (I have 3 budgie cages). They ... to drown out. Emotion: wink How about a parrotlet? I've never owned one, but they seem like active, social birds.

I've just been reading about Bourke's Parakeets on the web - they seem like the sort of bird my nan might be interested in (supposedly quiet, docile and easy to tame). Anyone had experience with them?
Phil
As it is, she's a lovely feathered friend who chatters ... to hand tame, they are endearing and loving little birds.

My budgies have never chewed the paper in the bottom of their cages (I have 3 budgie cages). They ... drown out. Emotion: wink How about a parrotlet? I've never owned one, but they seem like active, social birds. Becky

Don't know about parrolets. All my budgies tore up the paper in the bottom of the cage and tore their cuttlebones to pieces. We're talking a lot of budgies since 1966. When we moved to Thailand in 1969 and had to leave Robinson Carusoe with my grandparents, Grandpa put a laytex tiled floor in the bottom of his cage so he couldn't chew it up and it was easy to clean.

I've never seen my lovebird go to the floor of the cage. She prefers to stay up on the perches. She's also not really a loud bird, although once she gets started chirping she has fun. But only briefly Emotion: smile

Jill
I've just been reading about Bourke's Parakeets on the web - they seem like the sort of bird my nan might be interested in (supposedly quiet, docile and easy to tame). Anyone had experience with them?

I had a Bourke for a few months. She was a magnificent, quiet bird. One problem, though, was that she was almost too social. She HAD to groom our fingernails anytime she sat with us. She had to groom our hair, and anything else she could get her little beak on. She liked to chew, chew, chew, was a little bit hyper, but definitely quiet. Perhaps a male would be different. The personality of each bird differs, so I can't say what the usual temperament of a Bourke is. Becky
If she wants to look outside the parrot family, how about a ringneck dove, especially the white variety?
The female doesn't coo all the time like a cock bird. Doves are easy to feed, robust, and become very tame and affectionate. They won't bite!
They never learn to talk though.
How about a parrotlet? I've never owned one, but they seem like active, social birds. Becky

Parrotlets, Pacifics in particular, are tiny little birds with the attitude of an Amazon. They are totally fearless and can be impressively aggressive, although they are not very loud. I had a male for 17 years, who completely terrorized a Pionus and a Rose-breasted Cockatoo, although those 2 birds outweighed him by 10 to
1 or more. I now have a Pacific female, who's very pleasant, sweetand loving but is still very nippy.
Does such a bird exist? My grandma is thinking about getting a pet bird for company but she doesn't want ... a bird that's not going to be too much of a handful for an old lady with bad legs... Thanks.

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I am owned by budgies, lovebirds, parrotlets, a quaker, and lineolated parakeets.
Having lived and interacted with all of these guys for quite some time, my suggestion to you would be to looking into getting a hand-raised male lineolated parakeet. I find the linnies are, for the most part, very sweet-tempered, quiet and can be handled quite easily with very few nips. Of course, this varies from bird to bird but as a species I think linnies are great birds. The males can learn to talk and mine is already saying a few words "Be good", "Hello Savannah", "Hello Sierra".

All birds are noisy to a certain degree. It also depends on what you consider to be noise. Everyone's tolerance of noise differs from person to person. My quaker can blow out my eardrums, all my budgies chattering at one time can grate on your nerves as it just doesn't seem to ease up. It only takes one or two to get the gang going. My lovebirds squawking can be shrill and high-pitched. Of all the birds I have, the ones who are "easiest on the ear" are the parrotlets and lineolated keets.
Before buying a bird, take the time to get as much info and do as much research/reading as you can. I didn't do this eleven years ago when I bought my quaker, Kato. When he was a baby he was a quiet little thing, but as he grew up and matured I realized that he could be very, very loud as well as nippy. And speaking of biting/nipping, all birds will bite to a certain extent. I've been bitten by all of my birds at one time or another. Birds are pretty much wired that way.

Anyway, best of luck in choosing a companion for your grandma. As someone else suggested, an adult cat adopted from the Humane Society would probably make an ideal companion. I own several cats as well and they are by far the easiest pets to look after compared to my birds.
Linda
Does such a bird exist? My grandma is thinking about ... a handful for an old lady with bad legs... Thanks.

Anyway, best of luck in choosing a companion for your grandma. As someone else suggested, an adult cat adopted from ... own several cats as well and they are by far the easiest pets to look after compared to my birds.

Great advice, Linda. The bottom line is, birds are not the best pets for elderly people. They're loud, demanding and take a lot of work to keep healthy and happy. Cats on the other hand are independent and pretty much care for themselves, yet can be very affectionate.
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