Hi all,
This time around when skimming the pool just before vacuuming and shocking it I found a "bizzilion" tadpoles swimming around the pool. Also found a grey tree frog in the skimmer, so I assume these are tree frog tadpoles. We managed to net out about 75 or so of them and 2/3 of them were adopted by other family members. I now have about 25 tadpoles in a 10 gallon tank that I bought specifically to raise them. I went to the local petstore to get some advice on caring for them. They suggested I feed them frozen blood worms, which I did but it's been 2 days and they don't seem to be doing a whole lot with the worms. The tadpoles are about 1.25" long, some slightly smaller.

A few questions I have for the experts on this group:
1. What should I feed them assuming they don't eat the frozen bloodworms and how frequent?
2. The petstore suggested I don't use a filter, so I don't have thefilter running. But the water is already getting fairly cloudy and begining to smell.
3. I would think live food is the "cleanest" but what food would theyeat??
4. Should I aerate the water? Again the person at the pet store saidnot to.. but they keep swiming up to the surface, which seems like a lot of effort...
Thanks,
Kevin
You will need to leave water out overnight to get rid of the chlorine, then replace 1/4 of the water every few days.
Ammonia will build up fast in the water, the only way to keep it down is a lot of water changes.
Aeration will help.
I have used flake fish food.
Bryan
While I've never raised any treefrog tadpoles, I've raised some others and they tend to eat algae. You might try some algae flakes which you can get at a pet store.
Also, make sure that your tank is well-aerated. Put some plants in the tank also.
Lastly, when they start to transform - how long that takes depends on the species - it usually goes quite fast so make sure that you can deal with 25 tree frogs.
Enjoy! They're fun to watch.
Gary J Sibio
http://home.earthlink.net/~garysibio
There are 10 types of people in this world those who understand binary numbers and those who do not.
You will need to leave water out overnight to get rid of the chlorine, then replace 1/4 of the water every few days. Ammonia will build up fast in the water, the only way to keep it down is a lot of water changes.

Prior to recent decades the tropical fish hobby used to put together what were called balanced aquariums. By using the right combination of animals and plants, it was never necessary to change water. It's also possible to do this with tadpoles.
I don't have any tadpoles at present but, when I've had them, I've kept them in a 10-gallon tank with one goldfish and monitored the nitrates. I've never had a terst indicate that a water change was necessary.
Gary J Sibio
http://home.earthlink.net/~garysibio
There are 10 types of people in this world those who understand binary numbers and those who do not.
While I've never raised any treefrog tadpoles, I've raised some others and they tend to eat algae. You might try some algae flakes which you can get at a pet store.

I think the magic word is "spirulina." I haven't kept tadpoles in a long time, but I seem to remember that spirulina flakes are what a lot of folks use.

Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com