I was taking my pooch for a walk yesterday and was charged by a neighbor's dog who happened to have opened a gate and got out. The dog(?) is reported to be a 50% mix of wolf and huskie, or German shepherd, or something like that. Anyway, the dog charged and then came to a stop about 8-10 feet in front of me. (I, like a good pack leader, stood my ground in front of my dog, who seemed ready to engage but also seemed to feel reassured because she was standing between my legs.)

What I noticed about this wolf/dog was that, while it charged twice and was aggressively barking, its tail was held very low, almost between its legs. The position of its tail surprised me and I suspect has some meaning. What is the meaning?
I was taking my pooch for a walk yesterday and was charged by a neighbor's dog who happened to have ... between its legs. The position of its tail surprised me and I suspect has some meaning. What is the meaning?

I'm trying to scare you, but I'm also afraid of you

this is michael
reporting live...
http://dogtv.com
He was scared but probably thought ~he would try to tell you he wasn't. He thought if he barked he would scare you.
When it did not work he backed down.
A submissive move.
The next submissive move is down.
A really submissive dog will roll over on its back. I know a dog that is completely submissive...always lays on her back. To other dogs that is.
I however have only ever seen her on all four feet on one occasion. When the man had his young grandchild with him.
Protected him.
Pat.
I was taking my pooch for a walk yesterday and was charged by a neighbor's dog who happened to have ... between its legs. The position of its tail surprised me and I suspect has some meaning. What is the meaning?

perhaps the dog was worried as much as it was aggressive. Humans look pretty big with our heads held high, to the dog this might have looked like a tricky situation - two invaders and only just at the boundary, one huge two-leg!
Much as you may feel happy to have stood ground you should never go into a fight with a dog, apparently their jaws can move several times faster than our hands!
the fact that the other dog stopped may have also just been a suitable boundary point for the dog - i.e 'come no further'

btw, i'd read that pulling your dog up and 'away' from an aggressor (with a leash) is bad, stops your dog from being able to signal 'oops, sorry bud' and makes it look more aggressive.
was the dog's head up, eyes on you constantly, ears 'up' too? That usually indicates a degree of confidence and readiness, no attempt to calm the situation down (i.e. lowering head, turning to show it's side or back).
How was your dog? all ended ok i hope.
btw, i'd read that pulling your dog up and 'away' from an aggressor (with a leash) is bad, stops your dog from being able to signal 'oops, sorry bud' and makes it look more aggressive.

Once my dog took her position I just stepped around in fron of her; no pulling was necessary. The wolf/dog ran at us from about 100 feet away, stopped in front of us 8-10 feet, continued barking with tail down head up but not realling looking us in the eye, ears up. We stood our ground and after about 10 seconds it went back to its house. We then began walking again and it charged once again, doing the same thing. The owner then came out, apologized and returned the dog to the back yard. I think the dog is about 1.3 years old.
was the dog's head up, eyes on you constantly, ears 'up' too? That usually indicates a degree of confidence ... down (i.e. lowering head, turning to show it's side or back). How was your dog? all ended ok i hope.

No harm done.
Much as you may feel happy to have stood ground you should never go into a fight with a dog, apparently their jaws can move several times faster than our hands!

Standing ground is the best way
to AVOID engagement. Flee and
you prompt a chase instinct
and embolden the dog.
JohnR
Pit Bull Libertarian
Never sneer at the power of a little
pink squeaky toy!