can anyone advise me what to do! i have a male and female red ear slider both about 11 years old . They are in 20 gallon long tank with half rocks for basking but the male is always bothering the female. he gets a hold on her back legs and he is like a pit bull, he won't let go. He is about 6 inches long and she is about 8 inches long. Is this tank too small?
1 2
yes that tank is extremely to small, they need upwards of a 75 gallon tank. you also mention they have a basking light, do they have full spectrum lighting also? (ie:Zoo Med's Reptisun 5.0, Hagen's Repti-Glo 5.0)
can anyone advise me what to do! i have a male and female red ear slider both about 11 years ... let go. He is about 6 inches long and she is about 8 inches long. Is this tank too small?[/nq]Sounds like your male is feeling amorous towards your female. He is "in the mood" and she is not. I think your tank is way too small and would like to make a suggestion that will probably solve your problem. Have you seen those black pre-formed plastic backyard ponds at your local Lowe's or Home Depot in the garden section? Your turtles would be much happier if you got one of those and placed it outside. You would need to build an enclosure (some sort of fence/barrier) so they couldn't escape but would allow them access to land.

That setup would provide them with natural sunlight (free heat for basking and UV-A/B). You would also need to provide shelter from the sun. I would plant elephant ears, as they are easy to grow. Or any other leafy, water loving plant. Depending on where you live would determine if you would have to replant them every year. Depending on how much money you want to spend, you could make a really attractive area in your yard for your turtles to enjoy as well as yourself.

Just remember that these RES are going to keep getting bigger. Why not go ahead and plan for the future and set them up with a 100 gal (or bigger) outdoor pond?
griffin
can anyone advise me what to do! i have a ... is about 8 inches long. Is this tank too small?

Sounds like your male is feeling amorous towards your female. He is "inthe mood" and she is not. I think ... Why not go ahead and plan for the future and set them up with a100 gal (or bigger) outdoor pond?

Out of curisosity, to what lower temperature are RES good for? I know they hibernate during the winter, but I assume there's some lower limit... Also, what do you do for hibernation, give them a pile of loose hay to burrow in? Or will they dig their own holes? I don't have any turtles, but I am curious.
Gloria
Out of curisosity, to what lower temperature are RES good for? I know they hibernate during the winter, but I ... to burrow in? Or will they dig their own holes? I don't have any turtles, but I am curious. Gloria[/nq]I am fortunate enough to live in the south where it doesn't get cold enough to freeze ponds more than a couple of inches on the surface. I didn't know where the OP was from, so I gave some general information. Some people bring their turtles inside for the winter and place them in a large viv or aquarium and do not hibernate them. Some people hibernate them in refridgerators specifically set up for their turtles. If you live where it doesn't get so cold as to freeze your turtle pond solid, you can keep them outside in their pond, provided it is deep enough (>18 inches is suggested so that water temps don't change rapidly and remain stable).

I imagine you could also put a water heater/deicer in the pond if you were afraid of it freezing over too thick. But, in the wild, RES bury themselves in the mud at the bottom of lakes/ponds and hibernate. Their body metabolism slows wayy down due to the colder temps, and gas exchange occurs through their cloaca.

I guess the lower limit for the water temp would be around the mid to low 30's. As long as the water doesn't freeze solid and make a turtle-sicle...

griffin
I guess the lower limit for the water temp would be around the mid to low 30's. As long as the water doesn't freeze solid and make a turtle-sicle...

I've read about RES being observed swimming beneath the ice.

As far as the male biting the BACK legs, is that a common occurence? I've seen them "tickle" the female's anterior regions with the long fingernails, but didn't know they worked the back end also.
I visited the San Antonio Zoo two weeks ago and saw some Graptemys also doing the "tickling" bit.
im thinking those size turtles in that dinky of a tank, its territorial aggression, not mating behavior
I've read about RES being observed swimming beneath the ice. As far as the male biting the BACK legs, is that a common occurence? I've seen them "tickle" the female's anterior regions with the long fingernails, but didn't know they worked the back end also.

I've seen some pretty aggressive males doing the nipping and biting thing to their female tankmates. It must be more common in captivity where space is an issue.
I visited the San Antonio Zoo two weeks ago and saw some Graptemys also doing the "tickling" bit.

I love watching them do this. I always called it "fluttering" for some odd reason; just my own odd way of describing it.
im thinking those size turtles in that dinky of a tank, its territorial aggression, not mating behavior

maybe so. either way, putting them in a bigger area will probably help solve the problem.
griffin
Show more