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Wade,
I now have 16 snakes
My first post to group was Re: Question about separating different species of snakes
Cut and Paste below
Hi, Question about separating different species of snakes. I have 2 balls, 4 corns, 8 ribbons and one wild caught gopher. All in different cages but they are in same room side by side. Is it ok to have the cages close?

One year ago I had only one Ball Python now with so many I have become addictive to
herps.
Now I am learning about disease and parasites. I had a battle with mites on mice from pet store so now breeding my own.
Wade, I now have 16 snakes One year ago I had only one Ball Python now with so many I have become addictive to herps.

Going by your own words, you are relatively new to herp ownership. 16 animals in a period of one year.
That IS new and that IS a short time to accumulate so many animals.

As I stated, without sounding offensive (as I sense you are a little "touchy" in regards to being called a "new" herper); you need to give yourself time to learn how to properly care for the animals you have before going crazy and seeing how many you can accumulate over a short period of time.
I have seen this too many times from too many people. The practice of getting as many herps as one can in as short a time as possible has overwhelmed many well-intentioned herpers; and ultimately can lead to many animals being "dumped" because what was once an enjoyment is now a very time consuming commitment and can become quite costly.
Give yourself time to learn and enjoy the animals you have. Over time, you will soon learn the specific needs and husbandry skills for those animals you have. It is only by allowing TIME to be your mentor, not the opinions or advice of others, will you be able to determine what reptiles you enjoy, which ones you do not, and which ones you are drawn to.

I have (as many others here have as well) been involved with herps for many, many years...and not a single one of us can say that we like ALL types of reptiles equally well, and have "one of everything" just because we can.

In addition to breeding snakes I also operate a Iguana and Monitor rescue. However, if you ask many herpers, they either do not like Iguanas, or do not want nor have the time required to care for these reptiles.

This does not make them "dumb" or lacking is their skill as reptiles owners, but they are honest enough to know what their limits are. For me personally, turtles/tortoises and amphibians just don't do anything for me...so I stay away. Just because I have experience with many other herps, doesn't mean I can buy any tortoise/turtle dart frog, etc. offered at a pet shop (and I would NEVER buy ANYTHING if I didn't know exactly what it was) and expect to "know what I am doing".
As I said, if you get all bent out of shape that is a shame, for that is NOT what I am trying to impart upon you. You are new to herps...if you want to admit it or not. Take the time necessary to both learn AND enjoy what you have. Your animals will benefit from having an owner that has taken the time to learn about specific animal husbandry relating to their particular species, and you will find more rewards by allowing yourself to learn at a slow, even pace as well.
Just as with anyone here new to herps, I will be glad to offer what assistance/advice I can on those subjects I am familiar with. You are learning just as all of us here have had to learn (and are still learning).

I know of several people who have been involved with herps for many years who still only have one or two animals. These are the people who can actually give many herp owners a more precise insight to certain reptilian behaviors because they have the time to enjoy their pets, and are more perceptive to the nuances missed by many with large collections.

Remember, just as with ANYTHING: it isn't the number (amount) of herps you have that will give you experience, it is time, the willingness to learn; and being honest with yourself as to knowing your limitations.

~Wade
I agree with you a 100 %. I was the first to say I am really new. The reason I am asking so many questions is I want to be responsible. I did not want to sound touchy. I just thought I was doing more than most by asking questions first. I appreciated greatly every time you or someone else answers my question. My questions come from hearing conflicting info and I want to know what's correct. Instead of just believing the pet shops.

My next question is in regard to corn snakes due to the fact I have read a lot of conflicting info as of late. I have been keeping a temperatures as stated in most books and on-line info but have been reading some breeder sites and other websites that state you don't need to provide a temperature choices that they do quite well at room temp.
Sting
Thank you,
I appreciate your advice
I spent several days going over the requirements for a Boa constrictor constrictors and & Boa c. imperator I understand ... subspecies and original is not really know to the breeder. Cut and paste below. Thought I was doing good Sting

I love the Boas constrictor ssp.! You may fall deeply in love with this critter & keep it for many years. I honestly don't know you well enough to judge. One of my very first exotics was a Boa constrictor. I've had her for well over 20 yrs & I've never regretted my purchase. Thousands of snakes later she is still my favorite girl! Now if you had purchased a Burmese or green anaconda I might be reading you the riot act:^) Good luck with your new snake. May you love her as much as I love my original boa Ms. Bugsy. While I have fancier boas including albinos none are more loved than Ms. Bugsy. Best wishes with your new snake. snake lady
Slither Factory details:
Not knowing what it is that you purchased can be ... "red tail" exist; some with more demanding requirements than others.<<[/nq]
I've had my "red tail" boa for about twelve years without knowing its pedigree. He seems to be doing fine.
I agree with you a 100 %. I was the first to say I am really new. The reason I ... questions come from hearing conflicting info and I want to know what's correct. Instead of just believing the pet shops.

Research, research, research. Questioning the denizens of this newsgroup should be the result of your extended research, not the research itself.
My next question is in regard to corn snakes due to the fact I have read a lot of conflicting ... other websites that state you don't need to provide a temperature choices that they do quite well at room temp.

"Room temp" is extremely arbitrary (season, distance from the equator, drafts, home insulation, ambient home temps, and more). Please continue to provide ALL of your reptiles with a thermal gradient so they might adjust their body temperature at their leisure by moving around in their cages.
fr0glet
Slither Factory details: question as many forms of "red tail" exist; some with more demanding requirements than others.<< I've had my "red tail" boa for about twelve years without knowing its pedigree. He seems to be doing fine.[/nq]
A pedigree is simply a family tree... stating clearly exactly who the mother and father (dam/sire) of your pet were. That has little to do with the animal's originating locale.
There are certainly locale-specific care needs for the huge variety of Boa constrictors available in the pet trade today. I doubt that variety was available at anything less than astronomical prices twelve years ago... was your snake astronomically expensive?

fr0glet
I've had my "red tail" boa for about twelve years without knowing itspedigree. He seems to be doing fine.

"Pedigree" as you refer to it is nothing more than knowing its parental lineage.
Give you an example of what I am trying to convey:

Peruvian
Guyana
Hog Island
Colombian
Crawl Cay
All are considered "red tails"...with one major exception; if you kept all of those mentioned above in identical conditions, same humidity, etc.; two of those listed above would either go off their feed or regurgitate at the drop of a dime.
I would imagine that if your red tail is 12 years old, and it was purchased at a generalized pet store, you are more than likely the owner of a common Colombian or Central American (possibly even a "circle back"). Very nice snakes, but also a little more forgiving in their care than some of the other red tails available today.
~Wade
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