Am a the only duntz who's ever done this - -
I'm teaching my Rusty tricks... and I realize I've been teaching him the tricks but haven't
been forgetting to include proper markers and releases...

I say... "Sit..." or atleast I think that's what I say... he sits but pops up instantly - - almost like a spring is under him.

I say... "Down..." he goes down and pops up instantly like a jack-in- the box.
Every trick he pops up... and I'm thinking, "You duntz... STAY... STAY... STAY.." I even say STAY... "What is the dog hyperactive or something?" I'm thinking...
Then last night I was listening to a podcast where the owner was talking about markers and releases...
and I note to myself that I tend to say "Good boy!" after he does a trick... kinda without even thinking about it or realizing it.

Today I'm teaching him to do a trick and I HEAR myself say, "Sit... good boy!" (instantly he pops up) "turn around... good boy... st.." POP!
So finally I decide... that's it... no more good boy - - yes, o.k. and he get's his hugs, kisses and good boys when its all over... but still... each time I catch myself doing it... and each time he obeys... only I don't realize I've said it until AFTER I said it...
I think this is a great anecdote how its not always the dog that's the dummy...
Am a the only duntz who's ever done this - - I'm teaching my Rusty tricks, and I realize I've ... a spring is under him. I say, "Down..." He goes down and pops up instantly like a jack-in- the box.

Clicker training is a great way to teach people timing and markers. You say SIT. The instant his tail hits the ground, you click. Don't worry if he bounces back up. Give him his treat anyway. (The treat could be "good boy" and pets, but I've had better luck with a tiny morsel of food.) He'll catch on quickly to the new sound marker. (And if he doesn't, write again, and I'll tell you how to "prime the clicker.")
After several 5 minute sessions of clicking the instant his tail hits the ground, wait a second before clicking. Then 2 seconds. If he bounces up before you can click, DON'T CLICK. You're both learning patience.
Lia
(Email Removed) spoke these words of wisdom in
Am a the only duntz who's ever done this - -When an exercise is complete i praise

When the session is complete i say Free dog
Clicker training is a great way to teach people timing and markers.

Lia,
I wanted to thank you belatedly for your advice... The clicker has worked wonders... with, as you
say me - - the person. It has also improved Rusty's recall quite a bit... though I have to admit
how astonished I am... every day he seems to learn something new, and I never know if its from me,
in spite of me, or by himself.
I wanted to thank you belatedly for your advice... The clicker has worked wonders... with, as you say me - ... seems to learn something new, and I never know if its from me, in spite of me, or by himself.

Glad to help.
The funny thing about clickers is that the first question people always ask is why they can't just use any noise they can make without a clicker, a cluck or a snap, for instance. The answer is, that while in theory that should work, the clicker is just better. I believe the people who say they use a word for a marker. No, make that, I want to believe them, but the clicker works so much better for me that I have difficulty believing that it doesn't work for everyone the same way. The clicker is so quick, easy, precise. It does wonders for my timing, observation, precision and consistency.
It made the difference for Cubbe from being a dog who wasn't getting the point of any training to one who is a lot fun to be with.
I know that good training is a matter of finding the right method for individual dog, but I can scarcely remember what it was like training Sheppe, and I can't quite imagine the dog after Cubbe who might not take to it.
Lia, back after a week away from the computer and glad she didn't miss the whole soda thread