I'm writing for a neighbor who has no internet access

She found a small bird that had fallen from a two story nest literally running down a culvert in a storm, looked like a "wad of hair" brought it home last night and attended (him) all night
Today, he's doing well, unhurt and alert (clear eyed, attentive) he can perch on a finger, good tone (this little guy apperars to be in tip top shape. He's hopping around and tweeting musically. he can fly across the kitchen and land successfully (we provided a big towel for a landing spot). He enjoys bobbing up and down on a forefinger, flapping his wings

(I wish i could post the digital pic I shot of him but I might get flamed for the binary-!)
I don't know the species; he has a finch beak and brown feathers (maybe a sparrow-?) measures about 3.5" (9.5 cm) from beak to tip of tail; fully feathered but his tail feathers are a little short!

**SO** any tips for feeding this guy-? The neighbor has dribbled water , very small shards of earthworms and a little dilute oatmeal. I furnished an eyedropper and a plastic syringe.
Ultimately, the intention is to set him free any tips from you bird guys ??
I will print it out and run next door
Thanks-!
Buzzy
Hello Buzzy,
**SO** any tips for feeding this guy-? The neighbor has dribbled water , very small shards of earthworms and a little dilute oatmeal. I furnished an eyedropper and a plastic syringe. Ultimately, the intention is to set him free any tips from you bird guys ??

Not sure what country you're in but the best thing to do is ring a wildlife rescue society, most vets should be able to tell you who to contact in your area.
Raising baby birds is a difficult and demanding task. Setting them free is even more difficult, they have no idea what foods to eat, they don't know about predators and if they belong to a territorial species they will be harrassed...usually they just die a slow death.

Without knowing the species it's impossible to say what it should be fed. Earthworms are not good for baby birds.
Sounds like the bird is fully fledged and was about ready to leave the nest. If they live near where they found it they could try putting it back near the nest and see if the parents will look after it.

John
Thanks I will forward this to the bird nanny.
I suggested that she take the critter back to the site where he was found now that he is stable and perky (her workplace, fifty feet from a busy street) but the weather has been bad all week. Would it be a good idea to take him back in his cage and set him near the spot where he probably fell (or landed)? Maybe let him call a little might this get the attention of any parents nearby, eventually opening the cage-? Forgive me never done this before.
I also suggested (we) not handle him, but it's hard to resist. I just want this guy to survive.
Thanks for the post I'll let let you all know the results if the repatriation with the parents isn't feasible I know of a bird rescue outfit in our town.
buzzy
I'm writing for a neighbor who has no internet access She found a small bird that had fallen from a ... to set him free any tips from you bird guys ?? I will print it out and run next door Thanks-! Buzzy

No water! Feeding earthworms to a species which eats grasses might well kill it. Find an experienced rehabber or put him back where he was found.
If it is a sparrow it will be ok with live food. Sparrows are highly insectivorous when rearing young. Most finches feed insects as well as seed and greens while rearing. I have reared 2 sparrows this year and I'm hand rearing a second spreo starling, its only a week old. Ray.
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If it is a sparrow it will be ok with live food. Sparrows are highly insectivorous when rearing young. Most ... I have reared 2 sparrows this year and I'm hand rearing a second spreo starling, its only a week old.

Insects yes, but bloody gret worms??
Fledgling update
He's back in his neighborhood! My neighbor reports: (the weather's cleared up) she simply set the box down near the wall under the probable nest location and observed for a while the bird was active and inquisitive she removed the (chicken wire) top and he sat for a while, then flew to the edge of a neon sign enclosure overhead. He perched there for a while (five minutes?) and flew out of sight my neighbor said he flew well and "pretty far."
That's that I wish i could have been there as well. I hope the little guy prospers.
It's tough to know what to do when you find a wild bird in distress the instinct is to handle 'em and be a surrogate parent essentially, this bird just went from a rainstorm and swiftly flowing culvert to a dry environment and back to his territory in only one day. He seems hale and healthy and will probably be fine.
thanks to all for the help and comments-!
buzz