"CAMBRIDGE - Studying a species known to chase its own tail may seem an unlikely way to better understand the human mind. But scientists at Harvard University's new Canine Cognition Lab hope to gain insight into more than the psychology of dogs from visiting pet pooches..."
Diddy, I'd love to see what would happen if they evaluated Tuck!

Re that guilty look dogs give you when scolded:
"Alexandra Horowitz, who teaches psychology and animal behavior at Barnard College in New York, has probed the guilty look that dogs give, flattening their ears back and ducking their heads.

"In work recently accepted for publication in the journal Behavioural Processes, Horowitz had owners show their dog a desirable treat and then tell the dog not to eat it. They would leave the room and the experimenter would either give the dog the treat or take it away. When the owners returned, some dogs were scolded, even if they had not disobeyed.
"Researchers found that dogs looked most guilty when they were scolded, especially when they did not eat the treat. That suggests dogs are responding to a social cue. Even though we may associate a certain look with the way we feel, teasing out dogs' actual thoughts and feelings requires careful experimentation. "

http://www.psycport.com/showArticle.cfm?xmlFile=nytsyn 2009 04 14 medic 3445-0006-pat nytimes.xml&provider=New York Times Syndicate
or
http://preview.tinyurl.com/dg5xul
FurPaw

Don't believe everything that you think.
To reply, unleash the dog.
1 2
FurPaw (Email Removed) spoke these words of wisdom in
Horowitz had owners show their dog a
desirable treat and then tell the dog not to eat it. They would leave the room and the experimenter would either give the dog the treat or take it away. When the owners returned, some dogs were scolded, even if they had not disobeyed.

I could NOT do this to Tuck. We have a contract. To do this to Tuck would cut him so deep, it might profoundly damage our relationship.

When the new ESS puppy does something, and I say , "NO" Tuck takes it personally and tries to crawl in my lap. (New puppies tend to take a lot of direction. Unfortunately, Tuck takes seriously, that which the new puppy ignores)
Tuck is torn with this puppy. He knows he may not show aggression to any animal and this puppy takes his things, and Tuck MUST say NO, but he will not. The puppy is running all over him and his good nature. This causes much internal stress in Tuck. Yet Tuck will not defend himself and his things.
...The puppy is running all over him and his good nature. This causes much internal stress in Tuck. Yet Tuck will not defend himself and his things.

You need to teach Tuck that it's okay to rat the puppy out to a Higher Authority (you).

Mary H. and the restored Ames National Zoo:
The Right Reverand Sir Edgar "Lucky" Pan-Waffles;
U-CD ANZ Babylon Ranger, CD, RE; ANZ Pas de Duke, RN; and rotund Rhia
Tuck is torn with this puppy. He knows he may not show aggression to any animal and this puppy takes ... and his good nature. This causes much internal stress in Tuck. Yet Tuck will not defend himself and his things.

We've experienced this twice in our household. The first time was when Urger arrived as a 3-month-old pup and Kanyak was about 10 years old. (Both intact males.) For close to a year Kanyak doted on Urger to a degree that was astonishing. But then Urger became a teen-ager and though he was never agressive towards Kanyak, the reverse was definitely not true.

The second instance was when Balim (female English cocker spaniel) arrived about a year after Kanyak died of old age. She was less than three months old and this time it was Urger's turn to play "doting daddy". Balim could take bones right out of Urger's mouth. She probably would still be doing it if we let her.

Bob
http://www.kanyak.com
Balim could take bones right out of Urger's mouth. She probably would still be doing it if we let her.

Rudy and Lucy both let Marcie get away with anything, She's 18 months old now and has not lost her puppy license.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Balim could take bones right out of Urger's mouth. She probably would still be doing it if we let her.

Rudy and Lucy both let Marcie get away with anything, She's 18 months old now and has not lost her puppy license.

Same here with Teddy - he's 21 months old and the license is still good.
Balim could take bones right out of Urger's mouth. She probably would still be doing it if we let her.

Rudy and Lucy both let Marcie get away with anything, She's 18 months old now and has not lost her puppy license.

I don't think Muttley recognizes that "puppy license" stuff. We attended an introductory "class" at Petco last night, which also included a woman with a large young Dobe wearing a prong collar, and another woman with a young male black Lab (uh-oh), who she said was about 9 months old and neutered, so I need not worry. But I did.
The dog-to-dog greetings went well enough, although I thought I saw the Lab take a quick snap at Muttley's face, causing him to back off. They probably should not have been face-to-face anyway, and I/we did not allow that for any longer than a few seconds. Yet I felt some tension, and some of that may have been mine, traveling down the leash to Muttley, who was on an anti-pull harness.
After the instructor arrived, she alternated her attention to each dog and owner, and spent a good bit of time getting to know Muttley and building his trust and attention with treats, soon accompanied by use of the clicker. She got him to associate the clicker with good things (treats) as well as good behavior.
Later, Muttley went toward the woman and her black Lab, and she gave Muttley a treat. Her Lab did not seem to approve, and gave a quick show of teeth until he was also given a treat. That may not have been wise, as it may have reinforced the behavior, but at least Muttley did not react, and I pulled him back before anything could escalate.
I think the other dogs, being basically puppies after all, really wanted to play. Muttley is not so much playful, and he may have taken their attentions as serious threats and he might have taken it to a level where someone may have gotten hurt. Muttley has shown that he can play roughly with another large dog, without drawing blood, as evidenced by his interactions with Lucky. But in the presence of two other strange dogs over whom I did not have control, it might have been not so good to allow that play.
http://www.smart.net/~pstech/Muttley/Dogfight 9090031.JPG

This may not relate to the OP's information about a dog's "guilty expression". I found it interesting that the dog who was punished unfairly showed even more of this expression, which indicates it might signify a sad feeling of having a bond of trust violated.
Paul and Muttley
desirable treat and then tell the dog not to eat ... some dogs were scolded, even if they had not disobeyed.

I could NOT do this to Tuck. We have a contract. To do this to Tuck would cut him so deep, it might profoundly damage our relationship.

No, you could not. I was thinking more of you showing them a specimen of a dog with extraordinary cognitive capabilities. I had selected those paragraphs because of the parallel discussion of whether a dog knows what he's being scolded for (seemingly not).
When the new ESS puppy does something, and I say , "NO" Tuck takes it personally and tries to crawl in my lap. (New puppies tend to take a lot of direction. Unfortunately, Tuck takes seriously, that which the new puppy ignores)

When we had four, all of them reacted to a "NO." For that reason, we couldn't use a "no" to figure out who the culprit was!
Tuck is torn with this puppy. He knows he may not show aggression to any animal and this puppy takes ... and his good nature. This causes much internal stress in Tuck. Yet Tuck will not defend himself and his things.

Sounds like the pup (what's his name?) has a pretty powerful puppy license, as far as Tuck is concerned!
FurPaw

Don't believe everything that you think.
To reply, unleash the dog.
FurPaw (Email Removed) spoke these words of wisdom in
Sounds like the pup (what's his name?) has a pretty powerful puppy license, as far as Tuck is concerned! FurPaw

Tuck has adjusted. We had to step in and set limits, because Tuck will not. Tuck is used in the reactive dog classes as the dog that will tolerate anything. He may not react, and this pup is mild compared to the snarling hateful dogs that Tuck is passive to.
Tuck and the pup (Chief) go out and PLAY! and Tuck rolls on him and sits on him, or squashes him if he gets too rough.
Tuck has to be the most tolerant dog on earth, because the pup comes up and takes his food right out of his mouth.
I saw all those individual thank yous regarding Oppie. That must have been painful to do. I just can't imagine.
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