I was at the vet's yesterday to pick up some Advantage flea medication and saw a brochure for something new (to me ) called Revolution. It says it protects from heartworm, fleas, ear mites, hookworms and roundworms. It's applied the same way as Advantage (liquid on the back of the neck). It's also more expensive ($45 for 4 month supply) and requires a prescription and $28 initial exam. They have a website at www.revolutionpet.com. Is anyone here familiar with this stuff and have an opinion to share? It sounds like it might be a better way to go than Advantage.
Cory
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I was at the vet's yesterday to pick up some Advantage flea medication and saw a brochure for something new ... this stuff and have an opinion to share? It soundslike it might be a better way to go than Advantage.

At our shelter, we use Advantage on dogs, but Revolution for cats. Every incoming cat (8 weeks+, that is) gets Revolution. Your best bet will always be to talk to your vet about any advantages or disadvantages to switching.
That doesnt seem that expensive... basically the same as i payed for frontline.. I payed 30 for a 3 month supply so its still about 10 dollars a month. Figure if the REvolution really works it would seem a better deal as it protects against more things. Looking forward to seeing if others have tried revolution.
My vet had us treat the kittens with Revolution and it did get rid of their fleas. It took a couple of treatments to get rid of their ear mites. I've used Advantage on the older cats for fleas and that was effective.

I would think it best to ask the vet which is best in a given situation. I would assume the Revolution contains more chemicals than a flea (only) treatment. The question would be (for me) if the animal doesn't need the treatment for other conditions is it wise to subject the animal to the chemicals unnecessarily? Another question would be which (revolution or advantage) is easier on the animal.
The OP didn't mention whether the cat is an inside only cat or not. That would be a factor in determining which treatment would be preferable.

W

That doesnt seem that expensive... basically the same as i payed for frontline.. I payed 30 for a 3 month supply so its still about 10 dollars a month. Figure if the REvolution really works it would seem a better deal as it protects against more things. Looking forward to seeing if others have tried revolution.
I would think it best to ask the vet which is best in a given situation. I would assume the Revolution contains more chemicals than a flea (only) treatment.

It doesn't. It's a single chemical, Selamectin, with a chemical formula as long as lots of really long things joined together in a long way, longingly:
http://www.hclrss.demon.co.uk/selamectin.html
http://caltest.nbc.upenn.edu/merial/anthelmintics/anthel 12.htm
The question would be (for me) if the animal doesn't need the treatment for other conditions is it wise to subject the animal to the chemicals unnecessarily?

I would say it's best to avoid the chemicals, if you know it's safe to - but who can say when it's really safe to avoid 'em?
Another question would be which (revolution or advantage) is easier on the animal.

Revolution (and Frontline etc., I imagine) comes with a blurb listing how many animals died / suffered other ill effects from the drug during trials. Could just compare these numbers for Revolution and Frontline?
The OP didn't mention whether the cat is an inside only cat or not. That would be a factor in determining which treatment would be preferable.

Well, Frontline is effective against ticks, so it may be that cats with outdoor access would be better off with Frontline in regions where ticks are an issue. Revolution is not effective against ticks, but is effective against various worms.
Anyway, I've been using Revolution for c.8months, and have no complaints so far. It has successfully creamed a batch of ear mites and nuked a squadron of fleas. IIRC I pay ~$55 for a 6month supply per cat, but I may not be R'ing correctly...
Oh yes - a specific exam was not required to buy the stuff from my usual vet. YMMV?
Steve.
Is anyone here familiar with this stuff and have an opinion to share? It sounds like it might be a better way to go than Advantage.

We use Revolution, but I can't tell you whether it's better than Advantage because we use Revolution as a heartworm preventative, not for fleas. We also used it to treat and prevent ear mites in a stray cat we adopted. As to whether it works better than anything else, I don't know but it is easier to administer than Heartgard, at least with our cats.
I would think it best to ask the vet which is best in a given situation. I would assume the Revolution contains more chemicals than a flea (only) treatment.

No, it doesn't contain more chemicals, just a different parasiticide that is broad spectrum, called selamectin. So I suppose you could say it's just one chemical.
The question would be (for me) if the animal doesn't need the
treatment for other conditions is it wise to subject the animal to the chemicals unnecessarily? Another question would be which (revolution or advantage) is easier on the animal.

I don't think one is any harder on the animal than the other.
The OP didn't mention whether the cat is an inside only cat or not. That would be a factor in determining which treatment would be preferable.

It also depends on whether you want to proctect the cat against heartworm as well Revolution does and Advantage doesn't. Indoor cats are also at risk for heartworm in areas where heartworm disease is prevalent.
I would think it best to ask the vet which is best in a given situation. I would assume the Revolution contains more chemicals than a flea (only) treatment.

No, it doesn't contain more chemicals, just a different parasiticide that is broad spectrum, called selamectin. So I suppose you could say it's just one chemical.
The question would be (for me) if the animal doesn't need the
treatment for other conditions is it wise to subject the animal to the chemicals unnecessarily? Another question would be which (revolution or advantage) is easier on the animal.

I don't think one is any harder on the animal than the other.
The OP didn't mention whether the cat is an inside only cat or not. That would be a factor in determining which treatment would be preferable.

It also depends on whether you want to proctect the cat against heartworm as well Revolution does and Advantage doesn't. Indoor cats are also at risk for
heartworm in areas where heartworm disease is prevalent.

O K ! then I guess we're back to ask your vet. lol
>
The OP didn't mention whether the cat is an inside only cat or not. That would be a factor in determining which treatment would be preferable. W

Indoor/outdoor cat, 3 years old.
Cory
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