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"fr0glet" (Email Removed) ha scritto nel messaggio
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so

Sorry.
Anna
Sorry.

No apology necessary! Emotion: smile
fr0glet
I heat my enclosure with guarded, ceramic heat-troughs which create a daytime ambient temp of around 78F at cool end ... under the trough) of 90F, during the night I drop the ambient temp by 10F and turn off the hot-spot.

Note that the preferred active temperature of monitor lizards is generally in the range of 32 to 40 degrees C, which works out to 90 to
104 degrees F. Yes, active monitors have body temperatures which shouldbe about the same as that of mammals and birds. To reach these temperatures, the basking spot temperature really needs to be higher than this, I try to reach 120 to 150 degrees surface temperature with radiant heat. Below this, the monitor will be too cold to really feel active.
I also give the monitors a 6 week winter period ( light reduced to 8 hrs daily, no hot spot, highest ambient temp of 80F, reduced feeding) but this is only necessary if you wish to breed your lizards.

It may be that a prolonged period of fasting (up to 9 months) is necessary to keep savannas healthy. We do not know for sure, but they do fast for this long in the wild. A constant supply of food may be one reason for the high mortality of captive savannas at about 3 years of age.
under these conditions I kept and bred Bosc's savannah monitors for over 10 years with very little health problems and ... ( I have also found that keeping savannahs in a wild (non-tame) state is an important factor in successful breeding).

I find that tame savannas breed as readily as non-tame savannas. I also find that handling when young is not necessary for a docile lizard - nearly all young monitors are flighty and scared, and most savannas mellow out and become trusting as they reach maturity regardless of handling as long as they can get used to you as a non-threatening source of food and other good things. This may not work as well for wild caught adults, although the few adults I've had which were probably wild caught have tamed down, while one that I purchased as a hatchling and handled regularly remained sullen and hissy and generally anti-social its entire life.
Luke

To email me, take out the trash.
Note that the preferred active temperature of monitor lizards is generally in the range of 32 to 40 degrees C, ... to 150 degrees surface temperature with radiant heat. Below this, the monitor will be too cold to really feel active.[/nq].Under the conditions I kept my monitors at (around 90F hotspot) they are always very active. With reliable information very rare on Bosc's when I first started to seriously think about breeding the temps I used where mainly found by researching natural conditions. Under these conditions I had regular breeding success, no health problems and animals that seemed content with their environment. I have not kept Bosc's for around 5 years now, but plan on obtaining some young soon (maybe this year).

What sort of success have you had keeping Bosc's at these higher temps? I may be convinced to try higher temps with my new lizards, but would like to point out that at these sort of temperatures it is absolutly imperative that an extremely large enclosure is provided so that lower temperatures and mid-range temperatures are available. Also large sources of fresh water should be constantly available for bathing.
It may be that a prolonged period of fasting (up to 9 months) is necessary to keep savannas healthy. We ... supply of food may be one reason for the high mortality of captive savannas at about 3 years of age.

My last group of Bosc's where all 10 years+ at death ( 1 female was at least
12), I think that variety of food, using rodents and over fatty foods as asmall percentage of overall intake, correct mineral/vitamin supplementation and keeping the enclosure interesting to provide a reason for the monitor to explore/exercise are more important than fasting to ensure that monitors stay fit.
I wonder if it would help to feed him crayfish or crabs, I haven't tried that.

My sons svanna monitor shure seems to like the crayfish, fiddler crab, mud crab and sally lightfoot type crabs. He likes to fight them, chase them, crush them. he really seems to get off on the whole killing something deal. Recently he got carried away and grabbed my finger instead of the large crayfish i was giving him. (It was the whole getting him to stand on his hind legs and beg deal) He had me begging him to give me back my finger! He gave it back but not with out a struggle, when he finally figured out the finger was mine he let go. but I wouldn't want him to really bite me!
Moon
I breed dwarf crayfish for planted aquariums and grow trees in aquariums. My groups
.Under the conditions I kept my monitors at (around 90F hotspot) they are always very active.

Maybe you were not measuring the surface temperature? All the litterature I've read mentions 90 F as the lower end of the range of preferred active temperatures of all monitor species investigated (although to be complete, I will mention that the semi-aquatic varieties tended to have a bit lower preferred body temperatures than the more land dwelling species).
With reliable information very rare on Bosc's when I first started to seriously think about breeding the temps I used where mainly found by researching natural conditions.

Under natural conditions, the ground temperature at midday under a tropical sun gets well above 90 F! Air temperature will be cooler, of course. For a mid sized monitor like a bosc, a rack of 4 90 Watt halogen floodlamps about a foot or two above the basking spot does a good job of reaching these temperatures over a large enough area for the lizard to heat its entire body. Be sure to use floodlamps, spotlights are concentrated enough to cause burns.
Under these conditions I had regular breeding success, no health problems and animals that seemed content with their environment. I ... obtaining some young soon (maybe this year). What sort of success have you had keeping Bosc's at these higher temps?

I've had breeding and egg laying, but this was before I learned how to incubate monitor eggs properly, so never had any hatchling boscs (now arguses, on the other hand ...).
I may be convinced to try higher temps with my new lizards, but would like to point out that at these sort of temperatures it is absolutly imperative that an extremely large enclosure is provided so that lower temperatures and mid-range temperatures are available.

I think that a large enclosure is imperative for monitors regardless of the basking temperatures. They are active animals, and need room to roam. For most monitors, including boscs, a deep substrate of dirt that holds a burrow is also highly conducive to the animal's comfort and good health (it is really amazing the difference good dirt can make to a monitors activity, if you haven't tried it, I strongly encourage it. You may have to experiment around a bit to find a good dirt, though, and hauling in a half ton of dirt only to find out it will not work well so you have to haul it back out and get in new dirt can be a considerable bother. It is worth it, though). My rule of thumb on temperatures is
45 C to 55 C basking temperature, and around 20 C ambient temperatures.This allows the monitor to stay at the 30 to 40 C core body temperatures at which they are most active. Many other monitor keepers and breeders report lots of success using similar temperatures, on all species from storres and ackies through salvators and Komodos (the latter from zoos, of course).
Also large sources of fresh water should be constantly available for bathing.

There's some controversy on this among monitor breeders. I use tubs of water for my monitors, but it is a lot of work to keep clean.
It may be that a prolonged period of fasting (up ... mortality of captive savannas at about 3 years of age.

My last group of Bosc's where all 10 years+ at death ( 1 female was at least 12), I think ... to provide a reason for the monitor to explore/exercise are more important than fasting to ensure that monitors stay fit.

Could be. There's a lot we don't know about these particular lizards, yet. Argus and Nile monitors are so hardy they are just about bullet-proof, boscs seem so easy to kill.
A recent book has come out on bosc monitors authored by Bennet and Thakoordyal, titled "The Truth About Savanna Monitors", published by Viper Press, and available through some reptile supply companies in the U.S. (The Beanfarm and Pro-Exotics stock this book, I believe). This book is written by someone who has studied boscs in the wild (Bennet) and by someone who has had considerable success breeding them in captivity (Thakoordyal), and is an excellent source of information on this species.
Best of luck,
Luke

To email me, take out the trash.
You may have to experiment around a bit to find a good dirt, though, and hauling in a half ton ... to haul it back out and get in new dirt can be a considerable bother. It is worth it, though).

I have a theory about my savs dry skin. Could it be that some kinds of dirt has a very strong dehydrating effect when it sticks to him and dries up when he basks? I've noticed that when I dig in it myself and get it on my hands, they get very dry if the dirt dries up on them. It's like it sucks moisture out of the skin and evaporates it. Perhaps my dirt is too rich in clay?

Ulrik Smed
Denmark, Aarhus
I have a theory about my savs dry skin. Could it be that some kinds of dirt has a very ... It's like it sucks moisture out of the skin and evaporates it. Perhaps my dirt is too rich in clay?

It is best to keep the soil slightly damp, about like what you'd get if you turned over a spadefull of garden soil. This keeps the humidity up in any burrow the monitor digs. I use a hose or slosh buckets of water over my argus monitor's dirt from time to time (but they've got a lot of dirt to moisten). Remember, you don't want mud, but you don't want bone dry, either.
It the dirt turns into a slimy mess when you try to get it damp, either you're using too much water, or you've got bad dirt.

Good luck,
Luke

To email me, take out the trash.
I have a theory about my savs dry skin. Could ... and evaporates it. Perhaps my dirt is too rich inclay?

It is best to keep the soil slightly damp, about like what you'd getif you turned over a spadefull of garden soil. This keeps the humidityup

I agree with Ulrik that some types of soil seem to be dessicating. Recently out planting trees on the Talltree farm, we worked with good quality topsoil for hours mixing it by hand. I washed up after that and my hands were fine, soft skin as usual. We then dug many holes and hand-packed trees into them... the soil where we were digging had a lot of clay in it. I washed up again, and my hands were so dry within a few minutes that they were painful. I had several cracks in my hands from the dryness later than night.
fr0glet
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