My son has been feeding his Savanna monitor lots of crayfish. Can this do him any harm? Crickets and nigth crawlers were on teh menu before the crayfish. he likes to dive into his water bowl after them. Is there any other easy to get invertabrate the monitor can eat? I really don't want to start him eating mice. they are just so messy when they throw blood everywhere.

Moon
I breed dwarf crayfish for planted aquariums and grow trees in aquariums. My groups
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Crayfish are fine, actually good for him. Mice & rats are supposedly too fattening if fed frequently, but that's what mine gets pretty often anyway. Not messy at all if you pre-kill the mouse so the monitor won't slam it around so much. Mine is getting close to 30 inches, and takes small rats as I hold them by the tail & flip them over the top edge of his tank. He just scarfs them down with no mess at all.

Roger
My son has been feeding his Savanna monitor lots of crayfish. Can this do him any harm? Crickets and nigth ... eat? I really don't want to start him eating mice. they are just so messy when they throw blood everywhere.

Crayfish are excellent food for monitors. You can also feed them any of the giant roaches, such as madagascar hissing roaches or false death head roaches. Savannas seem to especially love the hissers.

I think invertebrates are healthier food for savannas than vertebrates, anyway.
Best of luck,
Luke

To email me, take out the trash.
My son has been feeding his Savanna monitor lots of crayfish. Can this dohim any harm? Crickets and nigth crawlers ... likes to dive into his water bowl after them. Is there any other easy toget invertabrate the monitor can eat?

Yes, crawfish are excellent sources of food for Savannah's, but if this is its only source of food, he may be prone to Thiamin (vitamin B1) deficiencies. Be sure to give B1 supplementation two - three times a week when adhering to a fish/crustacean diet.
~Wade
Crayfish are excellent food for monitors. You can also feed them any of the giant roaches, such as madagascar hissing roaches or false death head roaches. Savannas seem to especially love the hissers. I think invertebrates are healthier food for savannas than vertebrates, anyway.

My sav tends to get an upset stomach if he eats too many insects, gets loose stools of them. He even throws them up sometimes. So I stick more or less to mice, but am careful not to overfeed. He doesn't seem to be very healthy, I feel there is something bad with him or his cage, but I keep him with lots of soil, quite humid, lots of space (4 by 8, 2 feet sav) and quite much like Bennett/Ravi recommends. His skin is very dry and almost never sheds, and he doesn't grow. He seems to slowly go in the same direction as my former female, it's very depressive.
I wonder if it would help to feed him crayfish or crabs, I haven't tried that. I used shelled shrimp occasionally, but he didn't like them very much. I feel he misses something important, but can't figure what it is, it's like none of the food normally used is really good.

Ulrik Smed
Denmark, Aarhus
Bosc's Savannah Monitor Varanus exanthematicuscrayfish are a good food source but must be fed as part of a varied diet. try to give an equal mix of vertebrates and invertibrates as 80% of the diet with rodents making up the other 20%. also try and give as many varieties of invertibrates/vertibrates as possible - the more varied, the more chance your monitor will get a wider range of nutrients. i have heard it recommended, many times, that feeding commercial dog/cat meat, eggs, raw/cooked meat is o.k, IT IS NOT feeding foods with too much fat and keeping savannahs in an environment with little opportunity for exercise can lead to hepatic lipidesis (fatty liver disease - there is still some disagreement about how harmful this actually is, but I beleive it to be a major contribution in many monitor deaths).feeding these items can lead to many problems so steer clear.
I have always used a vit/mineral supplement when feeding insects (a small pinch of Nutrobal blown over about 2 dozen insects) and full-spectrum lighting as well as large enclosures (8 feet long, 3 feet wide, 3 feet high) for breeding groups of 1 male and 2 females. I also keep a large tray of fresh water (changed daily) many hides and branches (these are changed regularly,as is the substrate matter, to give the lizards incentive to explore). I also feed insect prey in small amounts over a longer period of time - this encourages the monitor to hunt for the insect - providing exercise.
I heat my enclosure with guarded, ceramic heat-troughs which create a daytime ambient temp of around 78F at cool end of enclosure 85F at hot end and a hot spot (a large rock directly under the trough) of 90F, during the night I drop the ambient temp by 10F and turn off the hot-spot. I also give the monitors a 6 week winter period ( light reduced to 8 hrs daily, no hot spot, highest ambient temp of 80F, reduced feeding) but this is only necessary if you wish to breed your lizards.
under these conditions I kept and bred Bosc's savannah monitors for over 10 years with very little health problems and great breeding success. These are great lizards, they can become very tame if obtained at a very early age and handled regularly and gently, although older lizards (18 months+) can be very difficult (if not impossible) to tame ( I have also found that keeping savannahs in a wild (non-tame) state is an important factor in successful breeding).
I hope you enjoy keeping your monitor as much as I do, they are intelligent and interesting lizards and are always coming up with new ways to surprise me!!
I heat my enclosure with guarded, ceramic heat-troughs whichcreate a daytime ambient temp of around 78F at cool end of enclosure 85F athot end and a hot spot (a large rock directly under the trough) of 90F,

I've read suggestions of much hotter basking spots, in excess of 110F.
under these conditions I kept and bred Bosc's savannah monitors forover 10 years with very little health problems and great breeding success.

What's the life span you've been seeing in your savannahs? Oldest so far?
fr0glet
"fr0glet" (Email Removed) ha scritto nel messaggio
What's the life span you've been seeing in your savannahs? Oldest so far? fr0glet

The oldest savanna monitor registered ever reached 10 years and 6 months, while the oldest bosc's monitor lived 12 years and 8 months. If this ages are difficult to reach for a monitor, the medium age must be lower. That's surprising (at least for me), I thought they had similare lifespans of iguanas and 10-15 years would be more appropriate.

Anna
What's the life span you've been seeing in your savannahs? Oldestso far? fr0glet

The oldest savanna monitor registered ever reached 10 years and 6months, while the oldest bosc's monitor lived 12 years and ... lower.That's surprising (at least for me), I thought they had similare lifespansof iguanas and 10-15 years would be more appropriate.

I meant that particular fellow's monitors. Emotion: smile
fr0glet
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