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Anyone know of a good website or book or something that deals with a dog guarding a food resource and getting aggressive with another dog?

I like Ian Dunbar's set of 9 or so pamphlets, a few of which deal directly and indirectly with aggression. Another good one is Patricia McConnells The Other End of the Leash .
Today, Maui scared Cali and I because he attacked her (growl/snap and lunge as she backed away so he could continue to snap/growl) over a treat.

Did you see what led up to it?
I never saw him like that. He's growled a few times in the past 3 years over food but nothing that caused me to worry because it was minor and stopped right away with a loud "Knock it off" (which is that even good ok?).

I'm the popularly-described "Dog Shouterer." Vocal distractions work best while they're still making up their minds, though. An early Nuh-Uh! or What Exactly Are You Thinking? makes them reconsider. Lower on my scale is That'll Do.
All bets are off if you miss the cue.
So, what are the best tips for what to do during and after an incident?

During. My first choice is a call off, then vocal distraction, then physical intervention. I try to escalate faster than the dogs.
After. Total shut down. I calm down and so do the dogs, time outs are a popular response to snarkiness.
And how best to prevent it?

Don't let it happen. Seriously, don't put your dogs in a position where they'll fail.
My gut tells me that for now, Maui gets no treats or only when crated alone, but is that right?

Both dogs.
And what the deal with crating? The incident happened about an hour ago and I immediately picked him up and ... way as I am mad at him right now (which I know might not be fair and doesn't help anything).

Good idea.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I should mention in case it is important that Maui is still not feeling/acting totally healthy after his stomach issues from 2 weeks ago and is still on 2 medicines for it.

I would guess that's a part of the problem. I'd forgotten about his illness and the first question I had was whether or not he was feeling well.
The other suggestions I've seen are very good. I need to do some reading as well...
So, what are the best tips for what to do during and after an incident? And how best to prevent it? My gut tells me that for now, Maui gets no treats or only when crated alone, but is that right?

It's what I'd do.
And what the deal with crating? The incident happened about an hour ago and I immediately picked him up and ... way as I am mad at him right now (which I know might not be fair and doesn't help anything).

That's not at all unreasonable. I use crates for time-outs, as well. Crating gives everyone a safe space until all parties have cooled off. I think you handled the situation just fine. It's scary, I know. It's not the end of the world, though. As inter-dog problems go, this one is at least manageable. (Hopefully, Paul is taking notes, especially on the part about how these two dogs have always been fine together with treats. Until they suddenly were not.)

You've gotten some recommendations, so I'll just say that if it were me (and it has been!), I would be removing all treats, toys, bones, etc. Anything that might possibly prove to be snark-worthy goes away. Some of those items may be reintroduced over the next few days/weeks, but only the lesser value ones. And what's of greater and lesser value is determined by how the dogs feel about them.

Knowing that Harriet is guardy about some things, I simply do not give them to her, or I give them to her in her closed crate. It's not the end of the world if she doesn't get another fresh cow femur, yaknow?
Another thing I've done is to make sure that she remembers that treats come from me, and are given to her at my whim. I control them, not her, and she darned well has to earn anything she values highly. Even cleaning my plate after I'm done eating has to be earned.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/clickerpets 1960 3124773 it was filled with kibble that comes out and dog jerky that doesn't

That's a toy with MULTIPLE treats. Very different from "A" treat. Food toys like that with multiple dogs are just not a great idea IMO. They're rally meant to occupy A dog. You have multiple dogs - they should be occupying each other!
even if he doesn't know why he was there, it kept him away from me at a time when I needed him to be away. I put him in there originally to be able to fully check on Cali and make sure she wasn't hurt.

right. But an hour later? Not so meaningful.
as for even having one, i like to keep it just in case I have a circumstance like this morning ... when I got home so he went in there to keep the furniture clean until I got home from work.

Sorry, but what if you couldn't have a crate? How would you cope with that? Either make sure he isn't getting muddy before work, or deal with him before you leave. Crating him because of a human shortcoming doesn't seem real fair.
Bigger treats (bones) - teach each dog to eat their own, on their bed only, if they're not sharers.

I think that sounds like a good idea for Maui. to only get a treat in one spot. any tips for training him this way?

Does he already have a "place" or "bed" command? If not, that's the first step.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
That's a toy with MULTIPLE treats. Very different from "A" treat. Food toys like that with multiple dogs are just not a great idea IMO. They're rally meant to occupy A dog. You have multiple dogs - they should be occupying each other!

I don't know about that. Some multiple dogs may entertain each other, but there are lots of cases where that is not true, or where it's not even an option. And I can envision plenty of reasons why someone might need to keep a dog occupied when they are home.
right. But an hour later? Not so meaningful.

Who says it needs to be meaningful? Dogs should not view crating even time-outs as punishment. You're just putting the dog in a safe, neutral place until everyone has calmed down, regained their senses, and any resulting problems have been sorted out.
Sorry, but what if you couldn't have a crate? How would you cope with that? Either make sure he isn't getting muddy before work, or deal with him before you leave. Crating him because of a human shortcoming doesn't seem real fair.

Depends, I think, on how he views being crated. Obviously, it'd be better if owners could always be perfect, but sometimes you just do the best you can.
That said, I wouldn't personally crate a dog because he was muddy. Pre-work outings are strictly supervised, but if it did happen, the dog would be quickly rinsed off (if I'm late for work, it's not a big deal, but I realize others do not have that luxury) or I would just take the consequences of having a dirty house (again, I have the luxury of answering to no one but myself).

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
I don't know about that. Some multiple dogs may entertain each other, but there are lots of cases where that ... And I can envision plenty of reasons why someone might need to keep a dog occupied when they are home.

True, but I don't think food is a particularly good way to go about that!
right. But an hour later? Not so meaningful.

Who says it needs to be meaningful? Dogs should not view crating even time-outs as punishment. You're just putting the dog in a safe, neutral place until everyone has calmed down, regained their senses, and any resulting problems have been sorted out.

I agree, but does that take an hour? Jenny seemed to indicated that she thought he was realizing she was *** during that time, and I doubt that he was.
That said, I wouldn't personally crate a dog because he was muddy. Pre-work outings are strictly supervised, but if it ... take the consequences of having a dirty house (again, I have the luxury of answering to no one but myself).

True. I hate seeing dogs crated all day, especially through no "fault" of their own. I love crates and advocate crate training, and use them in the car on a daily basis. But I also think they get used because someone can't be bothered handling the situation in a more productive way.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
True, but I don't think food is a particularly good way to go about that!

I think it depends. I'd do it differently than Jenny did, though, for sure, but that's because I already know how fast guardy behavior can explode out of nowhere. I just don't take those sorts of chances. These are her first dogs, and she's never really had experience with resource guarding, so she made a very common mistake.
I agree, but does that take an hour?

It might!
Jenny seemed to indicated that she thought he was realizing she was *** during that time, and I doubt that he was.

Oh, I'm sure he knew she was *** off. He's no dummy. He may even have known that it had something to do with him, but that's hard to tell. I don't think dogs are necessarily capable of putting two and two together, though, so I'd be surprised if he knew he was being punished for his behavior.
True. I hate seeing dogs crated all day, especially through no "fault" of their own.

I don't know how long Jenny works. Is it a full-time job? Since she lives with her family, perhaps Maui wasn't actually crated all day, not that all-day crating would have been horrible.
I love crates and advocate crate training, and use them in the car on a daily basis. But I also think they get used because someone can't be bothered handling the situation in a more productive way.

I think there are often better solutions than crating, but your posts on the subject are coming off as being very, very close to a blanket statement that crating dogs is bad. I don't know if Jenny had a better option than crating Maui, but even if she did, it's not the end of the world if he was crated for a few hours.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
I think there are often better solutions than crating, but your posts on the subject are coming off as being ... but even if she did, it's not the end of the world if he was crated for a few hours.

No, it's not the end of the world. Crates are not bad, and necessary for some situations. I always hope/advocate/advise/whatever that they are (in the home) a temporary or rarely used tool, once a dog has achieved adulthood. For clarification - that's crated with the door shut, not having a crate available if the dog likes it. There are a multitude of reasons why an adult dog may need to be crated at times. I just would love to see it not get used because of "not enough time or effort". I totally understand how easy it is to fall into "we'll just crate the dog".

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
No, it's not the end of the world. Crates are not bad, and necessary for some situations. I always hope/advocate/advise/whatever ... "not enough time or effort". I totally understand how easy it is to fall into "we'll just crate the dog".

Thanks for the clarification. I don't disagree with any of that, especially the last part. I've seen some horrible* misuse of crates. I once worked with someone who crated her dogs 23 hours a day, then was surprised when one of them, an ACD mix, went a little batshit crazy and snapped at her young son. Duh. The dog was unsocialized, unexercised, understimulated, and untrained. That poor dog deserved *much better. She ended up being put down, which I think was preferable to how she'd been living.
On the other hand, I also know that not crating a dog usually out of ignorance can have just as devastating results. Dogs with aggression or severe SA may be able to lead good lives if they are crated when left alone. If they have owners who will not use a crate, the dogs pay the price.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
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