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Mine know how to untangle themselves (they're sleddogs (except for Saber, who figured it out anyway)). Image is a magician, however. Aside from having a lot of miles in front of the sled, she also lived most of her life on a tie-out. When she gets tangled in the leash she jumps in the air, waves her legs around, and lands untangled. It's an absolutely remarkable thing to watch.
Yup, that's what Fly does. She's also a master of the rapid-fire twirling tap dance while tethered, somehow managing to never trip over the tether or tangle it on anything.

Melanie Lee Chang > Form ever follows function. Departments of Anthropology and Biology >
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When she gets tangled in the leash she jumps in the air, waves her legs around, and lands untangled. It's an absolutely remarkable thing to watch.

That sounds video-worthy!
All of mine not only know how to untangle their leashes if they walk around the wrong side of something, but how to disentangle their legs as well. They also understand the concept of going back around *me* if they get on the wrong side.
However, Brenin - not surprisingly- is the one who automatically disentangles himself; the girls usually wait to be told "Fix your paw".

All three of my guys are intelligent, but Bren's the one who really qualifies as scary smart. Aside from the fore-mentioned banana peeling, a few other things come to mind, though I think I've told all these stories before:
Very first scary smart thing I saw him do was at the shelter. He was alternating between what appeared to be completely berserk behaviour- bellowing at the top of his lungs, and hurling his body against the side of the run- and quietly sitting and meeting my eyes. (That, in and of itself, was unusual- the way he looked at me.)
It took quite a bit of observation, but I finally figured out that he was doing the body-slamming in an attempt to get the attention of the attendant who had the keys. Every time the guy came in sight- no matter how far away he was, and even when all that could be seen of him was the top of his hat through a window- Bren started hollering and bouncing off the wall. When the attendant was out of sight, Bren stopped and conserved his energy. And he didn't waste his energy on anybody else, not even the volunteers who were there- he knew exactly who had the power to get him out.
Then there was the time, not long after I got him, that I was playing ball with him, and an obnoxious Labrador kept running out beyond him, ready to snatch the ball. I kept having to fake out the Lab, then throw Bren's ball in another direction. After a few throws, I got tired of it and put the ball away, hoping the Lab would get discouraged and leave- which he did, sauntering away once the ball was out of sight.
Bren looked at the pocket where I'd put the ball, glared at the Lab, looked back at my pocket, then casually wandered away, sniffing the ground, nonchalantly meandered up behind the Lab... then suddenly lunged forward, nipped him once- hard- in the butt, turned around, and walked away. IOW, not only did he understand that it was the Lab's fault I'd put the ball away, but he deliberately took revenge AND quite deliberately behaved in a deceptive manner in order to do it.
And then there's the first time he decided to take the covers off the bed to get me up. It wasn't a matter of trial and error, or of shaping; he'd tried his usual whining, staring, and poking me with his nose, and I hadn't gotten up.
He stood there for about 30 seconds, glancing around, and you could just SEE the wheels turning in his head- "Ok, that didn't work. Now what can I do?" - then leaned forward, grabbed the covers, and yanked them off the bed.
Last but not least, he "got" weave poles in less than 15 minutes. Five minutes after he'd first gone through with guides on, he was doing them at speed without wires.
All of mine not only know how to untangle their leashes if they walk around the wrong side of something, but how to disentangle their legs as well. They also understand the concept of going back around *me* if they get on the wrong side.

Fidget understands this, that he has to walk around the same side of something that I do, and that he can't cross from left to right behind me. Sometimes he starts to, but you can just see him realize "Oh yeah, that doesn't work." But Humphrey absolutely doesn't grasp the concept. It's OK with just one dog (though the twirling makes me dizzy) but with two, it's almost impossible. Humphrey doesn't seem to realize that he can cross in front of me he almost always tries to walk behind me.

In everything else, though, he's doing wonderfully. He picked up the house rules in less than a day, and sometimes it seems like he's turning into a big Fidget he's started sleeping the way Fidget does and imitating some of his other mannerisms. And he must have been making progress David had the tray with the proto hors d'oeuvres on the counter today, and both of us were busy doing things in other rooms, and Humphrey didn't so much as make an attempt to get up there. At home, he would have eaten them right down!
His mom comes back sometime this next week. The first time he sits in the elevator for her, she's going to be in shock!

Found Poetry ( Science News , 14-Jun-2003): oldest homo sapiens find + + ocean eddies' far-flung effects;
Well, this isn't scary smart, but pretty smart. Our friend, who frequently looks after the dogs, couldn't find their treats one day. She asked them where their treats were and reported that the troika ran up the stairs into the office and all sat in a row, gazing lovingly at the big jar of treats.
Spencer was our scary smart dog. He warned us of a potential fire (like I read Fidget did). He helped pull up an old floor when shown how to do it. He stole crackers from a cabinet, took them behind a chair to eat, then created a diversion by the door to distract us. He opened the fridge (without being taught - and the fridge didn't have a towel on the door, either) to take a tupperware bowl of turkey to DH's bed. He opened the container without harming it in any way to get to his prize. He was always into something. He learned how things worked just by watching how humans worked them and he used things to get to whatever he wanted. He was an amazing dog...
Well, this isn't scary smart, but pretty smart. Our friend, who frequently looks after the dogs, couldn't find their treats ... up the stairs into the office and all sat in a row, gazing lovingly at the big jar of treats.

Diva is ball crazy and will go get her ball when I tell her to or ask where it is. One day, I told her to go get her ball and she walked over to Lacey's kennel, went in, rummaged under the blanket and came out with her favorite ball. Lacey hadn't been in her kennel in hours and Diva hadn't been in Lacey's kennel ever, but she knew the stinker had stolen her ball and hid it in her kennel. She had the funniest long-suffering look of resignation on her face when she went to get it.
Darla's dog Reilly is scary smart. When she told her dogs that Anna and Mimi were coming, they went to the window to look out at the driveway and also checked the little loft room where we stay when we visit. This was even though we had not been there in months as they live in Canada and we live in California. They have another guest room, so it is not like any question of where people might be would move him to check the loft. He's a very diligent and good dog, too. I don't think he ever uses his smarts for evil. It's a good thing Muggins, her other JRT, is not so bright.

Paula
"How Assur's gonads became a letter of the Roman alphabet 8000 years after he lived is too long a story to tell it all here." (www.resurrectisis.org/B1WebPage.htm)
Well, my little MinPin, Molly, is 2 1/2 yrs, old, and I think she is very smart. She knows "Go to the door", "Mailbox", and " Go wake up Lori", among others.
But, on Christmas day, we were visiting the in-laws, and they have 3 medium size dogs. My nephew, Kyle, was messing with one of them -"George", and was staring at him in the eyes, and made a comment about it. Well, Molly proceeded to trot on over, got between them, stood up on 2 legs, and stared at George right in the eyes for about a minute, gave Kyle a look, and trotted back to me, and jumped back in my lap. Maybe it was a "you had to be there" kind of thing. But, it was so smart & funny - we all cracked up! -Lori