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Crates are great for teething destructiveness, but can compound anxiety problems.

How do crates compound anxiety?

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Crates are great for teething destructiveness, but can compound anxiety problems.

How do crates compound anxiety?

They can certainly compound anxiety for dogs that have confinement issues or SA. Unfortunately, a lot of dogs with true SA are made worse, not better, with crating.
Mustang Sally
sighthounds & siberians (Email Removed) said in
How do crates compound anxiety?

They can certainly compound anxiety for dogs that have confinement issues or SA. Unfortunately, a lot of dogs with true SA are made worse, not better, with crating.

I agree as it pertains to correctly-diagnosed SA, but I've encountered quite a few "anxious" dogs who simply weren't properly introduced to the crate.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
They can certainly compound anxiety for dogs that have confinement ... with true SA are made worse, not better, with crating.

I agree as it pertains to correctly-diagnosed SA, but I've encountered quite a few "anxious" dogs who simply weren't properly introduced to the crate.

I don't buy that as the explanation for some dogs not tolerating crating. It certainly doesn't explain the
who-knows-how-many-thousands of ex-racing greyhounds, both with anxious temperaments and not, that become anxious when crated in their new homes after living in the same type of crate for years on the track.
Mustang Sally
sighthounds & siberians (Email Removed) said in
I agree as it pertains to correctly-diagnosed SA, but I've encountered quite a few "anxious" dogs who simply weren't properly introduced to the crate.

I don't buy that as the explanation for some dogs not tolerating crating. It certainly doesn't explain the who-knows-how-many-thousands of ... anxious when crated in their new homes after living in the same type of crate for years on the track.

Then we're back to my earlier point that such anxiety isn't caused by the crate which, after all, is just a tool anyway.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Then we're back to my earlier point that such anxiety isn't caused by the crate which, after all, is just a tool anyway.

I didn't say that the crate would cause anxiety, just that I would never use one on a dog that had anxiety problems cos it could make them worse. If fight or flight is an animals natural instinct when in a state of anxiety, and the animal then has no ability to take flight, all that pent up stress has got to vent somewhere, and self mutilation or trying to physically escape from the cage are 2 most obvious options.
If you remember my last GSD rescue was a flank sucker (self mutilation whereby the dog tears chunks out of her fur making the skin sore - then licking the patches making it sore and infected: which when we adopted her we first thought might just be a skin condition from a poor life history, until we realised it was just her 'vent'.) - self mutilation is no fun to live with.
Once the dog has learnt to be calm, then you can consider reintroducing the crate. If it were me, employing a dog sitter or taking her to doggy day care where she can be kept an eye on until alone training has got to the point that the dog knows to just settle down and sleep when you go out, is the only way I'd deal with this.
I only crated my weim when she was teething - for her protection - and I have no qualms about leaving her for as long as I ever need to, whether that be all day or for 5 mins.
Diana

Cindy the weimaraner's web site:
http://cindy-incidentally.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk
I didn't say that the crate would cause anxiety, just that I would never use one on a dog that had anxiety problems cos it could make them worse.

or it could save the dog's life.
If fight or flight is an animals natural instinct when in a state of anxiety, and the animal then has ... got to vent somewhere, and self mutilation or trying to physically escape from the cage are 2 most obvious options.

or, the dog might find that the reduced space and reduced responsibility of the crate lessen her anxiety.
Once the dog has learnt to be calm, then you can consider reintroducing the crate. If it were me, employing ... dog knows to just settle down and sleep when you go out, is the only way I'd deal with this.

unless, of course, the dog is even more stressed by being surrounded by strange dogs and being on unfamiliar territory. and, of course, dog day cares (at least in my area) do not accept dog-aggressive dogs, so if your dog doesn't get along with others, you're SOL. as for dog sitters, they are only an option if you live in a well populated area.
I only crated my weim when she was teething - for her protection - and I have no qualms about leaving her for as long as I ever need to, whether that be all day or for 5 mins.

i crated my dog while she was suffering from SA. for her, it was literally a life saver. she's as good as cured, and has been for years, so she is never crated now. she still loves her crate, though, and happily naps and has her meals in it. it's a safe place, for her, which is nice. it means that i can take her pretty much anywhere with me, and know that, as long as i take a crate along, she'll have a psychologically "safe" place. knowing that she can travel comfortably is very important to me.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com /
I don't buy that as the explanation for some dogs ... the same type of crate for years on the track.

Then we're back to my earlier point that such anxiety isn't caused by the crate which, after all, is just a tool anyway.

Yes, it is caused by the crate, because the only time it occurs is when the dog is crated.
Mustang Sally
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