My wife and I just adopted a 1.5 year old weimaraner from our local humane society. She is an amazingly sweet and loving dog, and so far we have found only one fault. She cannot be left alone even for a second without getting concerned and barking. She was obviously crate trained well before we got her because when we set up her crate for the first time, she ran right in and went to sleep. She sleeps in the crate in our bedroom at night with no issues.

We can lock up the crate before we go to work, but the second we disappear from her view she starts barking. She then paces back and forth (maybe trying to dig out) for minutes on end, and she has so much saliva coming out of her mouth that the bottom of her crate is wet with pools of slobber. She has had some accidents in her crate, but only while we've been gone. While home she is perfectly housebroken. We've so far left some bones she enjoys chewing in her crate with her, tried a kong with peanut butter but nothing keeps her occupied enough to forget were gone.

We also just bought a plug in with dog appeasing pheremones to try to calm her, but so far were not noticing any difference (its only been a few days however). We tried some basic training by leaving for a few seconds then coming back, and we can get to maybe 5-10sec, but after that she clearly gets upset. We are considering hiring a behaviorist to come to our home to assess our dogs situation fully, and coach us on the best way for us to mitigate her separation anxiet.

We are also interested in what medication via a vet could do to aide her transition while we attempt to make her comfortable while alone. My last question is whether with patience, professional help and medication if we truly can "cure" our dog of separation anxiety.
Sorry for my long email but any comments/help/advice would be helpful.

Thanks,
-Brent
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My last question is whether with patience, professional help and medication if we truly can "cure" our dog of separation anxiety.

Yes.
You've tried a whole bunch of things, but how long and how consistently did you work on these things? If you're looking for a quick fix, I think you're past that stage.
There have been some recent and good discussions about crate training on this group and on rpd.breeds concerning dogs with apparent separation anxiety. If they're not on your newsserver, google has them.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
FWIW, night time is what I consider the best time for testing a new dog's house freedom.

That so? Destructive behavior is CAUSED BY MISHANDLING and therefore can be CURED NEARLY INSTANTLY. LIKE THIS:

Do you suppose that everyone hates you like poison because of your mishandling of people and constant lies??
My last question
is whether with patience, professional help and medication if we truly can "cure" our dog of separation anxiety. Sorry for my long email but any comments/help/advice would be helpful.

Weims are notorious for over attachment, and that's why they are very seldom recommended for people who work away from home all day - that said, it can be done, so long as you are able to compensate in the mornings before you go to work and in the evenings.
These links will help you understand the character of the weimaraner... http://www.weimaranerclubofgreatbritain.org.uk /
http://www.weimrescue.org /
I personally would never crate an anxious dog - I've heard terrible stories of dogs ripping themselves to shreds trying to work out an escape. Crates are great for teething destructiveness, but can compound anxiety problems.

You'd be better off taking your annual leave consecutively, and both work on teaching her 'alone' training and working out her own comfort zones within the house. Setting up a cctv camera would be great so that you can work out patterns in her behaviour to help you work out a plan and leaving her in small but increasing increments will help a lot.
One thing that worked well for me when trying to cure my last dog, a rescue GSD, of separation anxiety was to ensure that she never saw me leave, focusing her attention on a stuffed kong toy or food scattered on the floor, then slipping out while she was busy with that. I kept up the same pattern with Cindy from the day we brought her home at 7 weeks and she's never been bothered in the slightest about being left.
for 'the best' source of weimaraner help on the net, join http://www.weimaranerforum.org ...see you there :)

Diana

Cindy the weimaraner's web site:
http://cindy-incidentally.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk
Thanks to those who provided legitimate feedback. Your thoughts are greatly appreciated. To the wackos who insist on typing LIKE this THE while THREAD, please post your ramblings elsewhere. We are making slow progress, and have decided to consult a certified bahaviorist to be sure were moving in the right direction.
Thanks,
-Brent
Brent,
Along with all the good suggestions you might want to leave a radio or soft music on for her. Even though you are not there it may help some. With a dog like this there is no quick fix only hard work and persistance but it will pay off in the end.
Celeste
Thanks to those who provided legitimate feedback. Your thoughts are greatly appreciated. To the wackos who insist on typing LIKE ... progress, and have decided to consult a certified bahaviorist to be sure were moving in the right direction. Thanks, -Brent>>.

Can you leave the crate unlocked?
I've copied this from another forum written by a behaviourist. She recommends creating a comfort zone, a place the dog can retreat to and feel safe and secure in.
http://www.takingthelead.co.uk /
*Comfort Zone is a place the dog would choose at home to rest/sleep in, not a place the owner gives access to or chooses. So, if for example a dog had access to anywhere in the home - what you need to know is were would she keep going to rest/sleep. It maybe on sofa, on your bed, under a table etc. This is her comfort zone and now needs enhancing by feeding in it, making sure water is available at it and spending time in it yourself with your dog.*
Where ever she chooses, you could put up baby gates to block her access to the whole of the house. You can put a duvet in there, her toys , a piece of your unwashed clothing. spend at least half an hour a day in there with her or as near as possible.
Alison
To whoever is posting the random talk about other people irrelevant to my conversation will you kindly go somewhere else. The net is large enough for you to spew your insanity somewhere other than my thread. If your goal is to help dogs live better lives than making it harder for me to read and understand the responses i get for my situation is making it harder for me to be sure my dog can spend her life restful and relaxed. So please go somewhere else. To all who have given constructive answers, thanks and please continue to add your advice.

Thanks,
-Brent
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