Hi ,
I've just read about the vet suggesting using a shock collar on a 4 mth puppy and on another forum a newly qualified vet said his 3 month kitten suckles his arm and pinching it and hissing at him doesn't stop it. OMG
The damage they can do !
All vets in training should have to take behaviour courses before they can qualify and call themselves vets.
Alison
1 2 3
@news6.svr.pol.co.uk:
All vets in training should have to take behaviour courses before they can qualify and call themselves vets.

Not really. I would not want to take Moogli to a vet that spent much of his education learning about about dog behaviour(1), as it would mean a lack of practice in the cutting and sewing part of his education. Just as surgeons are not qualified to give psychiatric advice, vets are not qualified to give behavioural advice. It is unfortunate that this is something that is not driven home to vets, or to people with pets.
(1) I don't know how much work there is that goes into becoming a dog behaviouralist, but I would imagine it is something that is equally as time-consuming as becoming a vet.

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Marcel Beaudoin & Moogli
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'Never say, 'Oops!'; always say, 'Ah,
interesting!'
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Not really. I would not want to take Moogli to a vet that spent much of his education learning about about dog behaviour(1), as it would mean a lack of practice in the cutting and sewing part of his education.

True, but unfortunately, many pet owners look to their vets for training and behavior advice. And that can be a disaster. I followed some advice from my vet with my first dog and it totally shut her down. I learned the hard way. Hopefully, nowadays they are more willing to refer to others
All vets in training should have to take behaviour courses before they can qualify and call themselves vets.

Why? A veterinarian is an animal doctor, no behavior experience is necessary for that qualification. I agree that it would be beneficial to teach behavior in vet school but if it comes down to teaching a specialty surgery or animal behavior, I'd prefer my vet learn the surgery. People shouldn't be going to their vets with behavioral issues anyway, that's what trainers and now behaviorists are there to help with.

Tara
Hi , I've just read about the vet suggesting using a shock collar on a 4 mth puppy and on ... do ! All vets in training should have to take behaviour courses before they can qualify and call themselves vets.

uh right.
better yet, all people with pets should be smart enough to know bad advice when they hear it.
-kelly
better yet, all people with pets should be smart enough to know bad advice when they hear it.

Aside from that, I'm completely unconvinced that the problem is that widespread. Maybe I've just been lucky but in my {mumble} years of pet ownership and my gajillions of vet visits I've never had a veterinarian make any but the most minor of behavioral mistakes.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Fascism should more properly be called 'corporatism,' since it is the marriage of government and corporate power. Benito Mussolini
All vets in training should have to take behaviour courses before they can qualify and call themselves vets.

Why? A veterinarian is an animal doctor, no behavior experience is necessary for that qualification. I agree that it would be beneficial to teach behavior in vet school

It is taught, but with little practical application.
but if it comes down to teaching a specialty surgery or animal behavior, I'd prefer my vet learn the surgery. People shouldn't be going to their vets with behavioral issues anyway, that's what trainers and now behaviorists are there to help with.

I agree 100%.
Vets can be a great resource when you're looking around for a good trainer or obedience class, but they should generally stick to fixing the body while trainers/behaviorists stick to fixing the brain.

Yup. That's my opinion, and I'm sticking to it.

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
People shouldn't be going to their vets with behavioral issues anyway, that's what trainers and now behaviorists are there to help with.

And how is the average pet owner supposed to find those trainers and behaviorists?
I've often considered the following: people with kids generally have tons of support, starting with education in the hospital. Once they come home, they also (usually) have support from their families and pediatricians. There's also formal support groups for parents of children of different ages, and parents of kids with special issues (health problems, behavioral issues etc.) Once the child starts school, there's regular meetings with teachers, who let them know how their child is doing relative to others his/her age, and again refers the child for special help if necessary (special classes, psychotherapy, etc.)
So, by contrast, what do dogs get? Some (I hope most, but wouldn't count on it) go to a vet regularly. A few go to dog parks and usually get (IME anyway) pretty dubious advice there. Even fewer have some support from their breeders. A very small percentage go to as much as a single basic obedience class if they're lucky, the happen upon a good one, but as you know many aren't. The percentage that seek advice from the Internet (Usenet, mailing lists, web sites and so on) is probably pretty miniscule indeed.
Furthermore, my experience has been that by the time many owners seek help of any kind, they too often have already written the dog off as hopeless :-(.
To make a long story short, all kids get help. The only contact most pet owners have with someone who can help them is... their vet.
So who the heck do you THINK the average pet owner is going to ask for behavioral advice? If they're lucky, the vet will know who the good trainers and behaviorists are, but I've found that they often don't :-(.
Dianne
$jcq$(Email Removed):
To make a long story short, all kids get help. The only contact most pet owners have with someone who ... lucky, the vet will know who the good trainers and behaviorists are, but I've found that they often don't :-(.

Another reason why people should go to responsible breeders for their pet. The breeders will (should) be able to point them in the right direction.

Also another reason for the AKC, CKC, and UKC (and other organisations like them) should be doing a lot more to educate JQP.

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Marcel Beaudoin & Moogli
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'Boingee, Boingee, Boingee!' Yakko,
Wakko and Dot
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