Hi. I have a 7 month old Siberian Husky. She's very smart and gentle and a great pet. Five days ago, we got a 8-week old Siberian Husky to be her companion. The baby is doing wonderfully - no accidents in the house since the first night. The problem is the older puppy. She wants to play 24/7. She won't leave the baby alone for a minute. She's constantly play biting, showing that she's alpha by "pinning' the baby down, standing over the baby, etc. None of it is at all aggressive. Only once has there been an incident and it involved the baby getting too close to the older one's food the first day.

But the only way the baby can get any rest or explore the house is by seperating them. The baby is sleeping in a cage in our bathroom and she's very happy there but when she comes out to play we let them play for a short while then we have to put one outside and the other inside so the baby can play with us or by herself.
The baby loves the older dog and sometimes initiates play but gets tired much more quickly and it seems that the older dog can never get enough. And she often starts out playing gently but she gets rougher and rougher as she goes. It's as if she is consciously trying to be gentle in the beginning but as she is having more and more fun, she forgets herself and gets rougher and rougher. She always stops an action that makes the baby squeal but her change in action often results in another squeal. Like she'll pin the baby, the baby squeals, she gets off of the baby, and play bites the baby's ear, baby squeals, she stops biting baby ear but grabs the baby's tail, etc.

Any suggestions? Will the novelty of having a baby in the house wear off eventually? And will the baby ever have a life of her own? As I said, we've only had the baby 5 days so perhaps I'm just not being patient enough??
They are under constant supervision when they're together and we always give her a sharp "NO" when she's too rough. Again, when she's reminded (either by us or the baby) she gets gentle again but quickly loses herself in the play and gets rough again.
Thanks for any suggestions.
Any suggestions? Will the novelty of having a baby in the house wear off eventually?

There's a good chance they'll be doing this into their teens.
They are under constant supervision when they're together and we always give her a sharp "NO" when she's too rough.

Good. I do think it's important to let the puppy have a chance to tell the older pup to back off - it's an important component of dog/dog socialization for both of them. Also, frankly, Siberians can be pretty noisy when they're playing. Sometimes when my guys are out in the yard it sounds like someone's being murdered, but it's just part of how they play. Knowing when to step in requires good judgment on your part.
Other than that I think you'll have to physically separate them to give the puppy (they're both puppies, really) time on its own. It should also learn that the crate is a safe space and choose to head to it to get away when it feels the need.

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Other than that I think you'll have to physically separate them to give the puppy (they're both puppies, really) time on its own.

Not to mention, both pups need alone time with the humans, including walks and training time. While the younger pup is resting, do stuff with the older pup so she's not bored and looking for ways to bother the younger one.

Suja
Other than that I think you'll have to physically separate them to give the puppy (they're both puppies, really) time on its own.

Not to mention, both pups need alone time with the humans, including walks and training time. While the younger pup is resting, do stuff with the older pup so she's not bored and looking for ways to bother the younger one. Suja

I'd also add that it's never too early to try to teach the pups to "settle," allowing them to be in the same room, but quiet.

We have older dogs, but we really had to work with them when dog #2 came home to teach them the difference between "inside" and "outside" play. This isn't as easy as separating them, but it's something to work on.
Obedience training is very helpful - "down" and "stay" are your friends!