I for one am more or less brumating my animals right now, which works out great since I'm not currently collocated with my animals (they've been at my parents' house since August while I am temporarily "homeless"). I'll have to pick them up once I get a house in my new location (probably January). So, for now, they're all in the misnamed "sunroom" at the folks' house at about 50 deg F.
I'm just hypothesizing that brumation may be the reason why the group's been so far off-topic lately. The cooler temps and resultant lack of outdoor herp activity tends to reduce the traffic on the field herping groups.

Chris McMartin

http://www.mcmartinville.com
http://www.mountainboomer.com

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I'm attempting to brumate some of mine, but our temps here in WA keep going up and down so its difficult to get the temps right. I'm doing more checking on my animals than I did last year!
Some of my adults seem to be trying to brumate THEMSELVES. NOT snakes I intend to breed. But the yearlings are not doing this. I'm concerned about 'turning them off' too soon; I keep thinking that if I preserve the daytime temperatures as they are and run the UTHs I'm actually going to reverse the trend rather than simply burn up the snakes' calories. I really wish I had an expert to ask about this. Unfortunately, the two close friends I have who are 'professionals' are both temporarily unavailable. At least I know enough to leave them 'perking' until I'm certain they've 'emptied themselves out.'

Only my adult corns and Emorii rats seem to be 'immune.' God love 'em.
Unfortunately, the two close friends I have who are 'professionals' are both temporarily unavailable. At least I know enough to leave them 'perking' until I'm certain they've 'emptied themselves out.'

I'm not an expert. I can only give you the results I've had since starting my animals on a "winter cooldown" for just the past few years.

I weigh my animals regularly throughout the year, not just approaching/during/after brumation. I've been surprised at how little weight my animals lose, even after a month to 6 weeks at 50-55 deg F and warmer (pretty high for a "true" cooling period). In fact, my 3-toed box turtle GAINED a small amount (water, but still).
When I switched my wandering garter snake to adult mice, he doubled his weight. Then he quit eating for almost a full year! I kept him at normal (non-brumation) temps for the summer/fall, then put him into the garage for the winter. After 330 days or so (I'd have to consult my spreadsheet for the numbers), he decided he was hungry again.

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Thanks much, Chris.
I'm just hypothesizing that brumation may be the reason why the group'sbeen so far off-topic lately. The cooler temps and resultant lack of outdoor >herp activity tends to reduce the traffic on the field herping groups. Chris McMartin

Cold weather + overcast skies = miserable me due to mild SAD = tiredness and fatigue = not posting as much