My gray banded kingsnakes eye caps did not come off after his last shed. They remain on there, and I think some dirt has gotten behind it as well, the lower half of the eye is light brown. He has also not eaten in two weeks. I have tried to feed him 2 times and have failed. Do the eye caps and his sight have to do with his eating? And also, I need to get them off, I fear for his eye sight, should I wait to the next shed (they shed once every 2 months) or soak him in water, or try to get them off with my hands.. or what...?
Any help is greatly appreciated by me and my snake. Thank you,
Zack
1 2 3 4
My gray banded kingsnakes eye caps did not come off after his last shed. They remain on there, and I ... them off with my hands.. or what...? Any help is greatly appreciated by me and my snake. Thank you, Zack

I'd soak him in tepid water. Not too warm or you will over-heat him.

I've had that happen a couple of times with boas and managed to VERY carefully manually remove them.
Do you have a water dish large enough for your snake to soak in regularly? It's a very good idea, most snakes like to soak and it helps them with shedding, as do a couple of clean, rough surfaced logs in their vivarium.
You can use a pair of blunt nosed tweezers if you are VERY careful! Plastic tweezer would be safer if you can find a pair.

Fingernails are better.

K.
Sprout the MungBean to reply
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, champagne in one hand and chocolate covered strawberries in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming WOO HOO- What a ride."
I agree w/ Katra but if you cant get them off go to your vet DO NOT wait till the next shed. If you do your snake may become blind. Also if there is debris under the eye cap you need to move even faster!! And Yes the sight probably does affect his/her eating habits
I'd soak him in tepid water. Not too warm or you will over-heat him.

Alternatively, when I have had problem sheds, I've found that putting the snake inside a soaked pillowcase, tying the top, and leaving that in the viv, in the warm end, has had a 100% success rate in removing stuck bits. It's also easier than soaking a snake that doesn't necessarily want to be in the water.
Hi
I haven't posted here before but thought I might be able to help. I have found that sealing the snake in a moist bag with some rough surfaced wet cloth (like a face flannel) is often effective. The moisture softens the scales and the snake can then work them off by rubbing against the cloth.

If that doesn't work then soak in tepid water and remove the scales manually. I have used blunt tweezers in the past VERY carefully but I was always worried about slipping and injuring the eye. I prefer to wrap adhesive tape round my finger - sticky side out - and dab or draw it across the old scales. If they have been softened by soaking that is usually enough to pull the edge up and let you remove it safely.
Hope that helps.
RoninUK
I agree w/ Katra but if you cant get them off go to your vet DO NOT wait till the next shed. If you do your snake may become blind.

That's not true. Waiting until the next shed is a VERY safe and perfectly logical solution, assuming one fixes their humidity problems to get a complete shed next time (see moist hide advice below). It will not cause the snake to go blind.
Also if there is debris under the eye cap you need to move even faster!!

The eye cap would have to be already half off to have debris under it.
And Yes the sight probably does affect his/her eating habits

Not to mention the discomfort of the remaining eyecap... try food again in a week.
I'd soak him in tepid water. Not too warm or ... with boas and managed to VERY carefully manually remove them.

Don't advise anyone else to do this unless they have a vet or highly experienced herper at their elbow, guiding them.
Do you have a water dish large enough for your ... a couple of clean, rough surfaced logs in their vivarium.

In my experience kings enjoy a moist hide box, too. Helps for complete sheds every time. Plastic box + snake-sized hole in side + moist gardening moss, placed in the hot area of the cage = happy snake.
You can use a pair of blunt nosed tweezers if you are VERY careful!

Not safe for an amateur.
Plastic tweezer would be safer if you can find a pair.

Not safe for an amateur.
Fingernails are better.

Not safe for an amateur.
fr0glet
Hi I haven't posted here before but thought I might be able to help. I have found that sealing the ... often effective. The moisture softens the scales and the snake can then work them off by rubbing against the cloth.

This is an EXCELLENT option, very safe. Virtually no risk.
If that doesn't work then soak in tepid water and remove the scales manually. I have used blunt tweezers in the past VERY carefully but I was always worried about slipping and injuring the eye.

This method runs the risk of tearing the retina and permanently blinding the snake. Not safe for amateurs.
I prefer to wrap
adhesive tape round my finger - sticky side out - and dab or draw it across the old scales. If they have been softened by soaking that is usually enough to pull the edge up and let you remove it safely.

This method runs the risk of tearing the retina and permanently blinding the snake. Not safe for amateurs.
It must be crawl-out-of-the-woodwork-with-unsafe-advice day here on RPH.

fr0glet
waiting till the next shed may be harmful! I did it and now my ball python is blind in the one eye! If you dont believe me thats fine but im just trying to help.
As I thought my reply made clear I do not advocate the use of tweezers preferring the use of tape if the snake can't clear the scales itself but in over 20 years of dealing with snakes across a great range of sizes and species I have never injured a snake's eye using either method. Nor have any of the many herpetologist I know who use the tape method encountered any problems. In fact several veterinary surgeons who specialise in reptile work also use the method as a very low risk option. As my post made clear neither method should be considered before the snake has been soaked to loosen and soften the redundant eye covings. Once they are adequately softened they will move away from the eye long before damage occurs to the eye.

Naturally care must be taken to ensure no injury to the animal but then that is true of any aspect of handling any animal.
and for your information Froglet I don't crawl out of the woodwork. I wonder if you are as quick to adopt such a rude manner in person as you apparently feel safe to do in NG postings.
RoninUK
Show more