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I've been using this technique with Star when he wants to pull, "The park the park, ohboyohboyohboy!" and now he realizes it is in his best interest to walk nicely and do whatever else I ask so that he can run with his buddies.

Mind you, I don't think it's possible to overstate how tedious that first session or two can be.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

The Milton Friedman Choir:
"bethgsd" (Email Removed) said in
I'm a big fan of frequent direction changes as a way of getting attention and liberal rewards for doing the right thing.

I learned that when riding horses. If you have a horse that starts to pull when heading back towards home, ... his best interest to walk nicely and do whatever else I ask so that he can run with his buddies.

With some dogs, changes of direction go:
"Something shiny gotta check it out!"
Change direction.
"Something shiny gotta check it out!"
Change direction.
"Something shiny gotta check it out!"
I don't have the patience of Job, so with these dogs I do the make-like-a-tree thing (which rarely works, but works enough that I give it a try). When that doesn't work, I work on my patience and go back to the change direction thing.

Very committed pullers, like the silver Lab I mentioned, and who I have only once a week, respond better to me when given a mission on their walk.
Here's a question for those who work with people and their dogs. Do you find youself using techniques that you don't use with your own dogs? Group obedience or group agility or once a week walks don't allow a format for shaping behaviours or even using the patience inveterate pullers need. Natch, handlers are supposed to do their homework, but that often doesn't happen for a bunch of reasons.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
"Rocky" (Email Removed) wrote in message >>
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Here's a question for those who work with people and their dogs. Do you find youself using techniques that you ... supposed to do their homework, but that often doesn't happen for a bunch of reasons. Matt. Rocky's a Dog.

Definitly. I've learned to have a whole bunch of tricks in my magic bag when working with others. Some students don't want or aren't willing to try my favorite techniques so I like to have some others to fall back on.

Beth
Here's a question for those who work with people and ... for a bunch of reasons. Matt. Rocky's a Dog.

Definitly. I've learned to have a whole bunch of tricks in my magic bag when working with others. Some students don't want or aren't willing to try my favorite techniques so I like to have some others to fall back on. Beth

I tend to teach with much more structure than I train. And a lot of the exercises we do in class (ex: for pulling) are simply never an issue for my own dogs. I also tend to keep my student dogs on clicker longer because it is helpful for their owners to have a way to be precise and observe and mark behaviors less sloppily than they do with their voices. We touch on shaping, but do more capturing. And when I have someone with a bad habit, I try to give them something really different to do - for instance a different piece of equipment (step-in harness/double ended leash) that forces them to think completely differently about what they are doing with their body. Or a clicker instead of really bad verbal communication. BroomSandy
I expect that this is the case with most class-based programs. I prefer to find situations where I can train ... as fun. I'd like to employ some of that in my weekly classes and I don't think it's possible. [/nq]In my classes we do some different stuff - instead of a lot of heeling in the first level we do things like approaching people and other dogs (on leash, of course) and choose to heel off leash. Some stuff like "leave it" and waiting at doors are very much real life skills. I explain to my students how they can use their skills in real life (for instance, your dog can have dinner, but he has to sit while you prepare it, your dog can go sniff that shrub, but he has to get there on a loose leash, and that real-life rewards are more meaningful to the dog than a cookie.

We also do a LOT of self control and zen exercises, and some environmental work. . I instruct my students that any time you are interacting with your dog, you are training. I ask my students to work on one skill at a time in 3-5 minute segments instead of setting a half hour aside to "practice" obedience.
I thought I'd give an update on Briar's walks. I opted not to use any special collars, just his flat collar, and to stop whenever he pulls as recommended. He's usually so stressed out on walks that he won't have anything to do with treats, but it doesn't seem to matter. He's a smart boy and has really progressed over the past few days. Tonight's walk went exceptionally well, we covered a lot of ground with him barely doing any pulling.

He has started to anticipate stopping when he feels the leash go taught and sometimes he slows down instead. Brilliant! He really seemed to relax for a good part of the walk and enjoy it. I even managed to get his attention a few times, ask him to sit and give him some kibble. We met a nice yellow Lab tonight and Briar was super friendly to him and to his owner (who agreed that Briar's a mix.. I really need to post some more photos).
The end of the walk was too much for him, though, and he wanted to pull the entire last block, so it was slow going. It was a combination of growling, barking dogs on the other side of invisible fences and a couple of cars going by that got to be too much for him. All in all, though, it was a very successful outing and I'm really impressed with this dog. He's a good boy.
I guess I'm going to have to find another way to keep my arms in shape for climbing. Emotion: wink

Lynne
"Every once in a while, the tables are turned and we get to share our lives with an animal who takes care of their human." - Tara, rpdb