I took both dogs on our first neighborhood walk tonight. I know it's not ideal to walk them together, but I'm simply not going to have time to adequately exercise them seperately. So anyway, HOLY CRAP. It's a good thing I have a sense of humor! I was soo grateful the streets weren't iced up because I got dragged for a mile (my arms couldn't take anymore beyond that). Roxy has gotten really good about not pulling, but Briar is a very strong boy who doesn't seem to mind choking...

I have been using a Martingale collar on all of our walks so far, but he is completely oblivious to it. I tried stopping short when he pulls, but honestly, we'd never get more than a few yards over the course of an hour! So I ended up running with them hoping to wear him out, but he STILL kept pulling. My biceps are worked!
I went to look at pinch collars and saw this Sporn halter. I thought I'd ask here before deciding to try it (or not). So what do you all think of this "halter"? Good, bad, stupid?
http://tinyurl.com/y2nstl

Lynne
"Every once in a while, the tables are turned and we get to share our lives with an animal who takes care of their human." - Tara, rpdb
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I took both dogs on our first neighborhood walk tonight. I know it's not ideal to walk them together, but ... time to adequately exercise them seperately. So anyway, HOLY CRAP. It's a good thing I have a sense of humor![/nq]You know I'm just trying to help you out, right? So please don't take this the wrong way. It concerns me that you seem to keep doing things that you know are bad ideas but do anyway. It has worked out okay so far, but pushing your dog when it came to resource guarding and now with walking both together on the first walk around the neighborhood... That's a lot of not good ideas for as little time as you've had Briar. It's far better not to do it that way.

You have plenty of time to see how far he goes in resource guarding and you have plenty of time to get him used to walking. If you don't have time to walk them separately, that's fine, but picking the very first walk to do it together wasn't necessary or smart. Take him out alone until you see how he walks on a leash and how he reacts to a brand new neighborhood he wants to explore. You could have been hurt and you could also have lost both dogs. It is so easy for one to get away if he's not good on leash and is strong enough to pull away and also cause you to let go of the other one struggling to keep hold of or run after the one that got away.

Briar doesn't know your neighborhood and may not find his way back.It seems to me that you are trying to start off in the way that you want things to go long term. That's not bad in and of itself and in many ways can be a good way to get started. But in other ways, it is going to buy you trouble and heartache and can set up both dogs for failures that needn't have occurred. You want the beginning to be a time of successes for all of your sakes and to set the stage for how all of you will live together.

So please get your daughter to walk Roxy while you walk Briar no matter what collar you end up getting. You can them separately yourself if no one is available to help you walk both at the same time. But don't walk them both together until after you have the pulling under control.
And when the next situation comes up where you think it might not be a good idea but you feel you should do it anyway so you can figure it all out now instead of later or whatever, please don't. It won't help you or your dogs. Take a deep breath and let yourself ease into two dog ownership. Let Briar ease into living in your home and in a two dog family. Let Roxy ease into living in a two dog household with a dog who hasn't been raised with your rules. Let your daughter ease in to having two dogs around the house. No one is going to benefit from rushing things. Everyone will be happier if you find ways to work it out slowly instead of rushing things and taking unnecessary risks.

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay
You know I'm just trying to help you out, right? So please don't take this the wrong way.

Of course, and I greatly appreciate all of your help, Paula (you don't even have to sugar coat things with me. Honest!).
It concerns me that you seem to keep doing things that you know are bad ideas but do anyway.

That was always an obervation in retrospect... that lovely 20/20 hindsite.

Everyone will be happier if you find ways to work it out slowly instead of rushing things and taking unnecessary risks.

Paula, thank you. You are absolutely right. I tend to be a square peg/round hole type person and I needed the reality checks.

Lynne
"Every once in a while, the tables are turned and we get to share our lives with an animal who takes care of their human." - Tara, rpdb
I went to look at pinch collars and saw this Sporn halter. I thought I'd ask here before deciding to try it (or not). So what do you all think of this "halter"? Good, bad, stupid?

I have found those to be worse than useless. Elliott was able to easily pull me off my feet and drag me down the sidewalk while wearing one. Aside from the fact that they don't seem to work very well, they are not any kind of training tool. I think a prong collar plus training is going to be much more effective at solving your problem in both the sort term and long term.

Shelly (Warning: see label for details)
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
If you don't have time to walk them separately, that's fine, but picking the very first walk to do it together wasn't necessary or smart.

That's a good point. If time is an issue, then what I'd do is walk each dog on alternate days until the new dog gets settled and has better leash manners. Walking one puller is dangerous enough. Walking a puller with another dog is just asking for trouble.

Shelly (Warning: see label for details)
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
I went to look at pinch collars and saw this Sporn halter. I thought I'd ask here before deciding to try it (or not). So what do you all think of this "halter"? Good, bad, stupid?
==
I tried using one of these halters on my Rottie once, but I found that the narrow strap that ran under her underarm caused chafing and a raw spot, so I stopped using it. I think it was a different brand though, but that one looks like it has a similar narrow cord running under the stomach near the dog's armpit..
I went to look at pinch collars and saw this ... you all think of this "halter"? Good, bad, stupid?

I have found those to be worse than useless. Elliott was able to easily pull me off my feet and ... training is going to be much more effective at solving your problem in both the sort term and long term.

Ditto. We used one of those on our first Dal, and all it did was to irritate the heck out of her 'armpits'.
Mustang Sally
Ah, but see. There is a way around that. Be proactive. Think about these things before you do them, and what dangers they might contain for you and your dog. Also, think ahead of time about what you want your dog to learn, and what things you are actually teaching him. Set things up to provide a learning experience. What he learned on your walk was that the way to get the person to go really fast is to pull like a power boat. Any time we are with our dogs, we are training them. You can either do it mindfully or you can let the dog call the shots and learn stuff you really don't like. It sounds to me like there's not much thought going into providing Briar with the information you want him to have BroomSandy.
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