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More important to read it S L O W L Y

I also think it's really important not to pathologize the dog. Don't start from the assumption that he's a resource guarder, or at least constantly recheck those assumptions. That is to say, start with what he did rather than with your interpretation of what he did. He resource guarded, but he may or may not be a chronic resource guarder under "normal" conditions (where "normal" means that he's not under stress in a new, unfamiliar situation and where he's not being asked new things, etc.).
Mental maps are useful (necessary!) tools but if you've got a faulty mental map you can go far, far astray and it's a good idea to keep checking to see if you're using the right one. It's really hard to know what's normal and what's not and what's a problem and what's just a quirk without a lot of experience.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
Don't worry about twice. More important to read it S L O W L Y

That's why I have to read it twice. First fast, then immediately after, slowly and carefully. Helps my tired brain understand, absorb and retain.

Lynne
I also think it's really important not to pathologize the dog. Don't start from the assumption that he's a resource ... means that he's not under stress in a new, unfamiliar situation and where he's not being asked new things, etc.).

That's great advice. Easy to take, too, because I'm really hoping that he's not a chronic resource guarder under normal conditions.
Mental maps are useful (necessary!) tools but if you've got a faulty mental map you can go far, far astray and it's a good idea to keep checking to see if you're using the right one.

I agree 100% (been there, done that, in different situations. Learned my lessson).
It's really hard to know what's normal and what's not and what's a problem and what's just a quirk without a lot of experience.

I'm feeling very hopeful about working with Briar on this. We just had a great little session and the boy will definitely work for food!! He's so damn cute, too.
Poor Roxy. When I came out of the room where I was working with Briar (and where he is now crated), she was all pumped up about what was in my pocket. So I made her sit and pulled...
out..
a..
!!..
kibble.
She walked away in disgust. Hehe.

Lynne
@panix3.panix.com:
More important to read it S L O W L Y

I also think it's really important not to pathologize the dog. Don't start from the assumption that he's a resource ... know what's normal and what's not and what's a problem and what's just a quirk without a lot of experience.

This is excellent advice.
As I mentioned, when I got Annie, she had a "history" of resource guarding. Because I can be a lazy, oafish handler, and was tired when I got the little bear I managed to ellicit a guarding response fairly quickly. Because the foster home she had just come from had told me she showed zero guarding tendancies (with dogs or people), I didn't automatically react with an "Uh oh..here we go...", but instead, I was calm, and just applied the techniques in a happy and playful way.

In a few minutes, it was a done deal. But if I had been Uber Concerned about the Bad Dog, my own body language would have reflected that, and the process may have gone differently, taken longer, been less fun for both..or any number of things.
Tara
But if I had been Uber Concerned about the Bad Dog, my own body language would have reflected that, and the process may have gone differently, taken longer, been less fun for both..or any number of things.

What she said.
The first night I had Morag, I reached down to move her food bowl, and she stiffened up, lowered her head, and growled menacingly. I stopped moving, told her calmly "Sorry, but I do have to move it", then got down on her level, moved my hand in slowly, slid the bowl away, and put it back down where it was supposed to be.
As posted earlier, AFTER that, she ate all her meals out of my hand, with the bowl in my lap. The problem went away as soon as she figured outthat:

A. I would never take her food (or anything else she valued) away unless I intended to either give it back, or give her something else. B. She would have enough food.
C. I was in control of the food, and back to B.
D. I would never yell, hit, scold, threaten, menace, etc. her for expressing that she didn't like something, or that she was uneasy with or afraid of something.
All of which can roll up into "as soon as she realized she could trust me".
If I had reacted either by being afraid and backing away, OR by trying to physically dominate her, correct her, etc., it would have made things much worse.
I also think it's really important not to pathologize the ... situation and where he's not being asked new things, etc.).

That's great advice. Easy to take, too, because I'm really hoping that he's not a chronic resource guarder under normal conditions.[/nq]You know, I know Lynne has me killfiled, so anyone who thinks this might be a useful thought, let her know. Tell it to her your own way, so she doesn't have to be subjected to reading anything I say It's possible that this dog is not only NOT a chronic resource guarder under normal conditions, but not a resource guarder at all. Clearly he doesn't guard against people and it doesn't really sound like guarding is the problem with dogs (bad manners, maybe) I assumed (probably mistakenly) at the beginning that Lynne understood what resource guarding was when she used the phrase.

The more she talks about it the less it sounds like resource guarding. Apparently he wasn't guarding from Roxy the first time - simply trying to rudely take HER possession away. Chances are SHE (quite rightfully) told him "no" and the fight ensued. Second time it's possible she gave him a look or a bump. When you're trying to keep things cool and unaroused, asking dogs to compete for or share food isn't always that smart. Food is very stimulating.

If you're not paying very close attention, it can be hard to know who actually starts the fight. And with Roxy teasing Briar when he's tethered, my guess is that the dynamic of what's happening is not just one dog behaving badly. BroomSandy
Sandy in Ok
I agree with your asessment of the situation and the alleged resource guarding. I have said all along, some time it just takes some time, but food and toys can be triggers in any dogs, especially ones that are new to each other. I am killfiled too, so she won't get the message from me. I did not criticize Lynne at first. I have made my share of mistakes, but not the same ones over and over.
I am still hung up on the fact that she brings a dog into her home days before she is leaving on a business trip?? Even without the events that have happened, wouldn't it be important to be around to oversee a new dog getting settled so you can observe and lay the ground rules?Finally, if he can be around her Pizza eating friends while she is rock climbing may not be something that she can know today..Most people like to have their dogs with them, but that is not always possible. Soo, if it cannot be determined in a few days if he is gonna be alright with her friends and their food is he gone? I did offer suggestions, not just criticize. I asked questions (to no avail) as I am killfiled. Why the burning desire to get a dog and try to make it work in 72 hours.

It usually doesn't go that way. Even when you have the best of dogs and you keep making the same mistakes. I think I have just discovered the rush. The dog has to be back to the rescue in so many days if he does not work out, right? I know she has a reprieve because the rescue person is on vacation and can't take him back for a week. The difference between me and her is that I have unlimited time with a rescue. Though I am anything but a professional trainer.

I give it my all. Call in help and know in my heart I have done what I could and the dog isn't suitable anywhere else either, leaving me with one option..Euthanasia..It has never come to that for me, fortunately.
I thought Paula gave great advice, step by step. She is not killfiled. Matt tried to, even before the first incident went down, and had to ask for a reply??? He is not killfiled..
So, what is it going to take??
Be Free..Judy
Sandy in Ok I agree with your asessment of the situation and the alleged resource guarding. I have said all ... went down, and had to ask for a reply??? He is not killfiled.. So, what is it going to take??

It truly doesn't sound that much like "resource guarding" I suspect that's just a term Lynne read somewhere and latched onto. IF i were truly out of my league, I'd be willing to listen to all advice, and quite honestly, if it really offended me, I might check to see why my knee was jerking so hard. But, I don't worry much about whether someone choses to killfile me or not. That's their option, and they don't owe me an explanation (thought I do find it sort of funny when people feel the need to announce that they are doing so quite dramatically!) I do hope, for Briar's sake, that she find a skilled professional to help her tease out the actual problem and give her a plan to fix it. I won't be holding my breath, though. BroomSandy
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