When I give my shepherd the command to "stay" at a distance, she always wants to come to me. If I give her a "sit" or "down" command at a distance, she obeys. Probably sitting or downing at a distance is better than standing, but in basic obedience training, shouldn't a dog be able to stay at a distance and remain standing? scott
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When I give my shepherd the command to "stay" at a distance, she always wants to come to me.

I don't know what your RL requirements are, Scott, but...

...if you've taught her the "stay" command, it was probably as an extension of the sit and down commands, e.g., maintain doing what you're doing (sit/down) until I say it's okay to move.

Sit/Down! Stay!
So she's probably very confused. She doesn't know what she's supposed to "stay" doing. She's probably thinking that you just want her to keep coming in to you.
I don't do much formal obedience work, and I absolutely HATE the "stay" command anyway (it's worse than worthless, because, IMO, it actually invites disobedience/slow response of/to the "sit" and "down" commands).
But "sit" means sit, right?
And "down" means down, right?
And that means anytime and anywhere and forever (i.e., until released).
Or it certainly should.
So I recommend that you forget about the "stay" command altogether and just work longer and harder on the "sit" and "down" commands (including distractions), until your dog will obey them immediately, even at a distance, and won't move until you release her.

Same result you're looking for(I think), and much less confusing to your dog.

Handsome Jack Morrison
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Actually, most of the training I have done with my one year old German shepherd has been exactly as you described. I think my understanding became a bit clouded after visiting and observing several different training facilities where the instructors seemed to insist that there student/handlers use a sit/stay and down/stray command. I remember asking them why they didn't simply use sit and down with the expectation that the dog stays until given the release command. I don't remember their explanations, but I do remember that at the time their explanations didn't make sense to me, but then I am not a pro trainer. Thanks for putting me back on the right track. It seems that my original instincts were correct.
Actually, most of the training I have done with my one year old German shepherd has been exactly as you ... a pro trainer. Thanks for putting me back on the right track. It seems that my original instincts were correct.

so you trust someone you know nothing about, someone you found on the internet, more than a professional dog trainer?
how odd.
-kelly
so you trust someone you know nothing about, someone you found on the internet, more than a professional dog trainer? how odd.

Sounds to me like he is trusting his own instincts first. And they were confirmed by H Jack, so why not? I too find the stay command more useful for the human, more confusing for the dog.
Sounds to me like he is trusting his own instincts first. And they were confirmed by H Jack, so why not? I too find the stay command more usefulfor the human, more confusing for the dog.

oh, i didn't say i disagreed with him about stay, i just found it odd he'd trust some random person on the internet rather than several different trainers.
oh well.
-kelly
Hmm! Should I put any value in the question you pose?

I guess I will, even though I came across you on the internet: Do you disagree with Handsome Jack's comments?
By the way, I have visited and observed more than a couple "professional" trainers who I would not want to work my dog.
Hmm! Should I put any value in the question you pose?

probably not. :-)
I guess I will, even though I came across you on the internet: Do you disagree with Handsome Jack's comments?

not particularly.
By the way, I have visited and observed more than a couple "professional" trainers who I would not want to work my dog.

ditto, but at least you can observe them before you make that decision.

-kelly
It takes time to build distance. Work on the dog holding a stand separately from holding a 'stay' at distance. Once the dog can do both, put 'em together, and expect a little lost ground at first.

Debbie
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