hi!
I've got three Sudan plated lizards and wish to breed them, as from what I've read on the web, they are mostly wild caught. I have no idea what sex they are, as they are still fairly small, but growing.
My question is, has anyone had success breeding them? Can they be kept in a large indoor enclosure with no top and high walls?

Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks in advance
Sue
hi! I've got three Sudan plated lizards and wish to breed them, as from what I've read on the web, ... kept ina large indoor enclosure with no top and high walls? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance Sue

Hi Sue,
Plated Lizards are among my favorites. They make very hardy captives, unfortunately I have never heard of anyone successfully breeding them with regularity.
Thats not meant to discourage you, I'd love to see someone giving more attention to breeding these awesome animals.The only way I know to tell the sex of your lizards is to take them to a competent vet and have them probed. You will need to spend a lot of time with your vet, I'd say your only chance at breeding these lizards is if they are kept in top health, extremely well fed and kept in optimum conditions. As far as the perfect environment goes, you will need to pool all of the resources you can find.

There are a lot of "caresheets" about plateds, but most of them tell you what conditions they will survive in captivity, and less often will you find actual natural history data. I imagine that matching natural conditions will be a key to breeding them. If you are still interested in breeding them, I'll pull all the info I can find in my library.
In the mean time, I seem to remember this as being a good site for info. http://www.nafcon.dircon.co.uk/gerrhosaurs1.html
just glancing at the page, it seems the author has bred them in the past, so the info is probably pretty acurate.
Let me know if you want me to check what printed literature I have on them. -Ryan
hi! I've got three Sudan plated lizards and wish to breed them, as from what I've read on the web, ... kept ina large indoor enclosure with no top and high walls? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance Sue

Hi, I also have plateds, mine are Tracheloptychus petersi. Nearly all of the plateds available are wild-caughts, captive breeding is quite rare. I personally suspect that the reason very few are breed is due to two things, availability of cheap wild-caughts, and lack of interest. What little information I have heard of indicates that they will breed in captivity if given the right conditions. Research daily temperatures, day light length, and humidity for the area that yours are native to.

As to whether or not they will climb, mine didn't until I glued some flat rocks to the side of their terrarium as a nice backing. They can really scale that rock fast! One thing to consider is that unless the room temperature is at least *** having an open top to the cage can lead to the in-cage ambient temperature to be too low. This includes screen tops as well. I use a UVB light, ceramic heat lamp, and some plastic strips to block off 80% of the screen lid (as well as provide heat and light). I also use an UTH for additional heating. This has the added advantage of increasing humidity, which is good for me because even though my plateds live in sand, they are river bank dwellers, and not desert animals.

Have you researched diet yet? Plateds are easy to feed, but most species are not 100% carnivorous. Most species need to have part of their diet as vegetables and leafy greens (any 'salad' you see for beardeds or iguanas is fine), although they do need more bugs then breaded dragons. I'm not sure what proportion, my guys are one of the few species that don't really need veggies.
The best way to sex them is to have them probed by a vet. If you haven't already be sure to take yours to the vet along with a fresh, still wet, sample of poop from each animal. Since your animals are wild caught there is a significant possibility that they carry parasites. If you want to breed then your animals need to be as healthy as possible.

Gloria
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hi! I've got three Sudan plated lizards and wish to ... they are, as they are still fairly small, but growing.

On adult males you can see femoral pores. But I don't know if you want to wait until they're adults.
Anna
theyre mine. I will wait
)
On adult males you can see femoral pores.

On adult females, you can also see femoral pores Emotion: smile At least that is my understanding and experience.
I have heard that the pores are more elongated in males, but how do you really compare that with the naked eye ? I've never been able to tell a difference.
-Ryan
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what

On adult males you can see femoral pores.

On adult females, you can also see femoral pores Emotion: smile At least that is my understanding and experience. I have ... how do you really compare that with the naked eye ? I've never been able to tell a difference. -Ryan

Femals have much smaller pores. The pores of males are protruded for 1-2 mm, the ones of females only 0.5 mm. And then females are less colourfull. (I think this is valid for every specie of Plated lizards)

Anna
Hi, again!
Ive also been feeding them assorted baby greens from the grocery store, which they snork right down. I believe ive got 2 females and one male, the male being the smallest, but the most colorful, and feisty. They've all been treated for parasites with ivermectin (sp?) which took care of the mites and the strongeloides (sp?) which were evident in their ***. The girls are about twice the size they were when I got them, and love to sit on a rock with their tails in the water. (?) After we get Pookie's enclosure finished, (one of my Niles) I want to start on a major place for my plateds to live.
Sue
Hi, again! Ive also been feeding them assorted baby greens from the grocery store, which they snork right down. I ... Pookie's enclosure finished, (one of my Niles) I want to start on a major place for myplateds to live. Sue

That's great. What kind of greens are you feeding? Lettuce is not very nutiranal, and spinach and kale are too high in oxilacids (I think). Collards and mustard greens are best, along with some shredded squash and carrots. I like the Sudans, they're really pretty. Good luck with them!