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I can think of one better. That's a real fence with an invisible fence running along side it. If you have a jumper, a climber, a digger or an adventurer, the invisible fence keeps the dog from getting close enough to think about alternatives.

A hotwire is generally more reliable.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
I can think of one better. That's a real fence ... the dog from getting close enough to think about alternatives.

A hotwire is generally more reliable.

Depends on where you put it. Have a friend who had a dog that could go to great acrobatics to get over a fence with a hotwire. Finally they ran it directly over the top of the fence (straight up from the fence) and while he missed it with his paws, he brushed his male parts upon it and fell back into the yard. Never tried escaping again.

Emily Carroll
http://www.fluttervale.com/kennel - Fluttervale Labradors http://www.fluttervale.com/biography - Canine Biography
Depends on where you put it. Have a friend who had a dog that could go to great acrobatics to ... with his paws, he brushed his male parts upon it and fell back into the yard. Never tried escaping again.

I should think!
A hotwire typically has a more reliable source of power and doesn't depend on the dog wearing a special collar. I don't know any experienced Siberian Husky people who use a radio fence in any combination, although I'm sure there are some out there. More typically they use a solid fence in combination with some sort of anti-digging protection (poured concrete, railroad ties, hardware cloth) and/or a hotwire placed about 9" off the ground or right below the top of the fence (or both). I've been fortunate not to have any serious escapers. Saber has figured out how to open gates but I gather for him it's kind of like doing crossword puzzles rather than out of a genuine interest in running off. Cinder has several significant excavation projects going and I'm keeping an eye on those.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
@panix2.panix.com:
A hotwire is generally more reliable.

Melinda, can you string a hot wire along the bottom of a chain-link fence to dissuade a dog from trying to go under? Our fence has a few small gaps in the bottom where the ground undulates a bit. Storm isn't remotely intersted, but the eventual puppy probably will be. Since he's likely to remain intact, I really want him to stay in.

Kate
and Storm the FCR
Hi. I want to surround my home and yard with a suitable electronic fence. My house is on a 1/4 acre lot. Any suggestions on a high end system? What are the advantages and disadvantages to this type of system? Any alternatives to consider?

Disadvantages? The first thing that comes to mind is the bischon that regularly escaped his electric fence and came over to annoy our GSD through our chain link fence.
The second is the adolescent mix who joined us on a walk last week. She had an electronic collar but no ID, so we had to call animal control and hope her owners noticed her missing. BTW, I noticed that her collar was extremely tight - no doubt to hold the prongs on the collar pressed firmly into her flesh to ensure good electrical contact.

The third is the GSD across the street who busted out a couple of times and terrorized people walking by with their dogs.
I'd stick with a material fence. Even if your invisible fence is effective at keeping your dog in, you have to check it daily to make sure it's still working, and be aware of conditions under which it may stop working.
And then, as others have posted, your dog isn't protected from anything that comes wandering into your yard.
FurPaw

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Feel free to use the above variant pledge in your own postings.

To reply, unleash the dog.
Melinda, can you string a hot wire along the bottom of a chain-link fence to dissuade a dog from trying ... but the eventual puppy probably will be. Since he's likely to remain intact, I really want him to stay in.

No, you need to make sure that the wire doesn't ground (which also means keeping weeds from growing around the wire). Lots of people bury railroad ties, pour concrete, or bury hardware cloth. If I have to go that route I would tend to go with a hotwire or with concrete or hardware cloth. railroad ties don't give you much of an advantage over concrete and they're a lot of work to bury (although if you've got some big, brawny men with a backhoe you're in business (and lucky!)). My other concern with railroad ties is that they're treated with crap like creosote, which I'd rather not bury on my property, especially around my dogs.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
Cinder has several significant excavation projects
going and I'm keeping an eye on those.

My Labs do that too. The problem is that they usually plant their butts to the fence and dig for the joy of it. So we don't worry about it. (Besides, if they get out, they just come to the front porch and look confused...Rusty fits under the gate if he tries hard enough.)
The Collie, OTOH, refuses to get himself dirty, and will run around them barking that they're screwing up the whole job, you can just see him trying to convey that they are doing it all wrong and need to turn around.

Emily Carroll
http://www.fluttervale.com/kennel - Fluttervale Labradors http://www.fluttervale.com/biography - Canine Biography
@panix2.panix.com:
Lots of people bury railroad ties, pour concrete, or bury hardware cloth.

sigh.
Mentally budgeting the time to dig trench, level trench, rent concrete mixer, get concrete, mix concrete, shovel concrete, etc. The backhoe is not an option because of configuration of this fence-line. :-(

sigh

Kate
and Storm the FCR
A hotwire is generally more reliable.

But wouldn't the hotwire be something that could be touched by an unknowing human stranger? I like the idea of knowing that the wire only works on the one wearing the collar.
Lia
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