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That sounds great! 100 people ain't that hard to find. Schools, shopping malls, gatherings in the park, friends, walks in the city, etc.

It's not that easy here. None of it happens without loading the dog into the car and taking him intentionally to places to socialize him.

I hope I've convinced her that it's worth whatever effort it takes. Counting to 100 isn't as important as not only taking advantage of opportunities but also creating them.
We did discuss some of the places she can take him - to her classroom at school when she starts to get her room ready for the new year. There will be other people in and around there. To friends' houses. Sitting outside the grocery store. At least I've got her thinking of places.

She, of course, wants to protect him from various contagious things while he's still so young - he's only had one round of shots so far. But she figures that our dogs are safe. And I've encouraged her to work on socializing with people at first and we'll work on more dog socialization after his next round of shots.
Judy
I think you've helped me tremendously with my approach! Thanks.

I spend my work days explaining to 5 to 12 year olds the hows and whys of the world and teaching their parents how to get the behavior they want out of kids. The hardest is teaching parents how to get the behavior we want out of kids, and know will be necessary for them to learn to make it in the big world, when the parents aren't convinced such behavior is necessary or even desirable. I get lots of practice with explaining to people who just don't get it.
Yesterday when I met the pup, the wife was most concerned about not allowing this dog to jump on people ... he tries to jump and forcing his face down to the ground. (this is how she trained her two Rotties.)[/nq]Start with the wife, then, and show her how to teach the boxer to sit and then sit for attention. It sounds like she spends the most time with the dog, so it's great that she is also the one with the highest motivation to work on the jumping. I think jumping is the most important behavioral issue with dogs who are going to be around kids. Most dogs won't bite hard enough to hurt a kid even if not really trained. Thank goodness or there would be a heck of a lot more scarred kids out there.

But jumping is a problem whether the dog doesn't likes the kid, doesn't like the kid, plays, guards, doesn't get its nails clipped, whatever. Especially a bigger dog with little kids. Even if they love the kids to death and protect them with their lives and would give them the chewies off their backs (mixed metaphors, but...), a kid can get seriously hurt if the dog is not taught not to jump up on kids.
I suggested that it was easier to teach a positive action than a negative one. Teach a rock solid Sit. ... ability to train a dane to do that than a spring-loaded boxer, but it's a nice goal to think about.

I like the sit for attention because the dog cannot move when sitting. Not only does it avoid jumping up and knocking the kid over, it also avoids running into the kid or bumping him over. We had to retrain Gunther because he is the most gentle and loving dog in the world, but he leans into his lovies and could easily knock a little kid over. He almost got Mimi and she is older and used to dogs, but she can't withstand a hundred pounds of leaning dog. He's clueless when he's being petted. So he has to sit now and he can't get the leverage to knock anyone over no matter how in the groove he gets.Even pre-verbal kids can help train the dog. Mimi was telling our dogs to "Gick" and petting them when she was tiny and they were far bigger. I don't know how much was understanding what she was saying and how much was ingrained sit when around a human behavior, but either way it worked. She would love up on the dogs and they would beam and be reinforced to sit again. I would be right there to back her up.

If they didn't sit, I made sure they rethought that and then let the children reinforce them for it. If it can work for dalmatians and lab, you can train a boxer. Like I said, with certain dogs we have had, you may have to accept a hover-sit because actually sitting still on the butt is just impossible, but you get the same safety factor.
Feel free to email me or even give the neighbors my email if you want. It's the same as in the headers, but at verizon.net instead of earthlink. Making dogs kid safe was how I got involved in rescue and even before I got into rescue, I got my first dog as an adult when I had a toddler and infant. It's always fresh in my mind.
Paula
I like the sit for attention because the dog cannot move when sitting.

Dogs know that's not, strictly speaking, true. I've had to teach a few not to scoot around on their butts while in a seated position. (And of course I've taught a few to scoot around on their butts on command ... ). But sitting does require all four feet + butt on floor, and that's
incompatible with jumping and some other problem behaviors.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
"Judy" (Email Removed) said in
She, of course, wants to protect him from various contagious things while he's still so young - he's only had ... work on socializing with people at first and we'll work on more dog socialization after his next round of shots.

Because of my lifestyle, I can't keep now 12 week old (second round of shots yesterday) Maybe away from other dogs. All I can do is mitigate the risks. I think that it's a pretty safe bet that dogs at agility trials are vaccinated at least those who belong to people I know and I've seen the proof of vaccination of the dogs in my daycare.
Between two out of town trials (Maybe's already been in a motel and camped in the rain!) in the last two weeks and my daycare, she's met a huge variety of dogs and, more importantly, a wide range of people.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
@panix2.panix.com:
I like the sit for attention because the dog cannot move when sitting.

Dogs know that's not, strictly speaking, true. I've had to teach a few not to scoot around on their butts ... sitting does require all four feet + butt on floor, and that's incompatible with jumping and some other problem behaviors.

True. I should have worded that differently. The dog is not as likely to move, and especially in a way that could hurt a kid, when sitting.

Paula
True. I should have worded that differently. The dog is not as likely to move, and especially in a way that could hurt a kid, when sitting.

This IS a boxer. We're working on the Sit but since that Boxer "arm" just has to swing out and touch you, I may suggest that it soon get changed to a Down.Judy
Didn't the New Skete book include stuff about alpha rolling?

I'm not sure if the puppy book ever did; the book that really adovcated it, and was notorious for causing problems, was the ironically titled "How to be your dog's best friend".
However, I've been told (haven't verified it) that newer editions of the book
have had the emphasis on "alpha rolling" removed or at least toned down.

Too bad it was the old verson that Morag's former owners checked out of the library. :-P
It's nice to see people who are able not only to change their minds but admit to it.

According to what I've heard, it was more a matter of possible legal action against them by people who followed their advice, and got bitten by their own
dogs and/or made fear and aggression problems worse, forcing the Monks to change their
tune - at least in print.
Do they really know how to properly socialize a puppy? ... his life, socialization is even more important than obedience training.

I sent them the link that Suja posted for the free download of Ian Dunbar's "Before You Get Your Puppy". ... pretty over the top. I suggested that she take every possible opportunity she had or could create and do it.

If I were in your shoes, I'd be emphasizing to her that GOOD guard/watch/alarm dogs
need to know what NORMAL situations are, so that when they are adults, they will know
what's not normal and react to it appropriately. I'd also be emphasizing that Boxers are naturally protective, and that they don't want the dog
"protecting" them against family, friends, neighbors, the mailman etc.

IOW, more everyday, ordinary situations the pup is exposed to, the BETTER he'll be, as an adult,
at picking up on what's "off".
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