Okay, the neighbors - the ones with the boxer who was ill-trained and drove everyone crazy - had to have him PTS about three weeks ago. They had considered (as I had hoped they would) going dogless for a while but couldn't stand it.
So, they now have a seven week old fawn and white boxer. Over half white. BYB. (They do intend to have him neutered and understand that he never should be bred.)
I would like to take a proactive course of action to try to head off a repeat of the previous dog. They are open to suggestions - particularly since they now have small grandchildren whose parents don't appreciate them being knocked over by a large dog. Their daughter has two HUGE Rotties who are not a problem with their kids. And this couple had, back when their kids were small, a very well trained boxer. So they know it can be done.

I just visited the puppy and we had a discussion about training him to be better around little kids than the last one was. I suggested that they NOT follow their daughter's advice about jerking the puppy's choke collar down to the ground every time he tries to jump up. Instead I proposed teaching a VERY solid "sit". Emphasizing that it's easier to teach a positive action than a negative one. (And I suggested they take off the choke collar he was wearing around the house. They did immediately.)
They even asked about boxers and agility training. So I'm hoping that it means that they are going to be willing to do more work with this dog. And having seen the results the last time, *I* will be more willing to step in and work with him - on a daily basis if need be and if they'll let me. It makes *my* life easier when the neighbor's dog behaves.

But I'm thinking first of making up a puppy basket for them and including some reading material. I have, in the past, seen suggestions for Brian Kilcommons' book "Childproofing Your Dog". I see now that he has a new book out "My Smart Puppy". Any thoughts on these books? I understand that Kilcommons has changed his training methods somewhat since his earlier books?
Any other suggestions for general puppy training books? Especially ones that address large(r) breeds and little kids?
Judy Russell
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Okay, the neighbors - the ones with the boxer who was ill-trained anddrove everyone crazy - had to have him PTS about three weeks ago.

That sucks!
So, they now have a seven week old fawn and white boxer.

People like this should really think about getting an older, reasonably well trained dog from a rescue or a good breeder.
I would like to take a proactive course of action to try to head off a repeat of the previous dog.

Who can blame you? Our sorta neighbor's new dog (now a little over a year old) has turned out to be reasonably dog aggressive. He even got a bite into Khan (who was on-leash, on our driveway; the other dog was off-leash and playing with the 9 year old in the family). That's the last time I've seen him off-leash, so at least they're doing something about it.
Any other suggestions for general puppy training books? Especially ones that address large(r) breeds and little kids?

Not a puppy training book, but Ian Dunbar's Sirius Puppy Training video is pretty good ,as is 'After you get your puppy' (they should've read 'Before you get your puppy' which is available for free now - http://www.jamesandkenneth.com/new puppy.html).
Suja
Suja
It actually was very sad. The friends and family were all of the same mind "I really hated that dog but..". He did get very sick at the end and was in a lot of pain so the PTS was a relief.
So, they now have a seven week old fawn and white boxer.

People like this should really think about getting an older, reasonably well trained dog from a rescue or a good breeder.

Uh-huh. They are convinced that you have to get a puppy in order to train it the way you want it. (Or in the case of the last dog, not train it.) And they consider AKC papers as proof of good breeding. Or at least okay breeding. And they haven't gotten burned by poor health in their BYB dogs. So I pick my battles.
I would like to take a proactive course of action to try to head off a repeat of the previous dog.

Who can blame you? Our sorta neighbor's new dog (now a little over a year old) has turned out to be reasonably dog aggressive.

The last dog was completely non-aggressive. He loved everyone - dogs and humans alike. He just was a boxer with no training. Rough and rowdy and bouncy but not a mean bone in his body.
He even got a bite into Khan (who was on-leash, on our driveway; the other dog was off-leash and playing with the 9 year old in the family). That's the last time I've seen him off-leash, so at least they're doing something about it.

That would make me extremely unhappy. In some ways that's an easier situation to deal with then this old boxer was. If he had been mean or dog-aggressive, they would have done something about him.
Not a puppy training book, but Ian Dunbar's Sirius Puppy Training video is pretty good ,as is 'After you get your puppy' (they should've read 'Before you get your puppy' which is available for free now - http://www.jamesandkenneth.com/new puppy.html).

Thanks for those suggestions!
Judy
But I'm thinking first of making up a puppy basket for them and including some reading material. I have, in ... Your Dog". I see now that he has a new book out "My Smart Puppy". Any thoughts on these books?

I'd give each two thumbs up.
I understand that Kilcommons has changed his training methods somewhat since his earlier books?

Not to my knowledge.
Any other suggestions for general puppy training books? Especially ones that address large(r) breeds and little kids?

Mother Knows Best: The Natural Way To Train Your Dog, by Carol Benjamin, is pretty good, too.
And, of course, there's always the classic, The Art of Raising a Puppy, by the Monks of New Skete.

Handsome Jack Morrison
Let's hope that this message takes hold, and soon: http://hotair.com/archives/2007/08/09/video-moderate-muslims-sing /

Why "liberal" doesn't quite fit:
"In the short term, this reflects the failure of the Republican Party to secure its hard-won victories. In the longer term, this may provide a new opportunity for the heirs to authentic liberalism - today's conservatives - as they often thrive when lovers of big government, by whatever name they go by, overreach." http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2007/08/why-liberal-doe.html

"Reality-based" Rabbi Defends Michael Vick:
http://www.debbieschlussel.com/archives/2007/08/dumb liberal lo.html

"The main proponents of 'universal coverage' want to throw more money at the current health care system, which strikes me as unwise. I believe that the 'universal coverage' mantra is dysfunctional for the same reason that 'more money for public schools' is a dysfunctional mantra for education. When your current approach is digging you into a hole, the sensible thing to do is not to dig faster. It is to stop digging." http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=080607B
I understand that Kilcommons has changed his training methods somewhat since his earlier books?

Not to my knowledge.

I was thinking he had changed his earlier total endorsement of the Wodehouse methods of leash training?
Mother Knows Best: The Natural Way To Train Your Dog, by Carol Benjamin, is pretty good, too. And, of course, there's always the classic, The Art of Raising a Puppy, by the Monks of New Skete.

Thanks for the suggestions!
Didn't the New Skete book include stuff about alpha rolling?

Judy
Mother Knows Best: The Natural Way To Train Your Dog, by Carol Benjamin, is pretty good, too.

I continue to recommend this. She also wrote a book "Dog Training for Kids" that may be useful.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Didn't the New Skete book include stuff about alpha rolling?

In the new version they say that while they'd recommended it in the first edition they can't continue to do so, and had a brief discussion of why they've stopped.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
I like Patricia McConnells books, and they're quite affordable. She's got one for puppies and for adults. Check Amazon or dogwise. You might also include a kong with the basket. Emotion: smile
Hope
Not to my knowledge.

I was thinking he had changed his earlier total endorsement of the Wodehouse methods of leash training?

Again, not to my knowledge, Judy. If you watch his videos, you'll see a lot of Woodhouse.
On the other hand, every trainer eventually adds his own touch, and there are probably subtle (and maybe not so subtle) differences between the two.
For example, I don't think he says "Walkies! WALKIES!" Heh.
Mother Knows Best: The Natural Way To Train Your Dog, ... of Raising a Puppy, by the Monks of New Skete.

Thanks for the suggestions! Didn't the New Skete book include stuff about alpha rolling?

Not the new editions.

Handsome Jack Morrison
Let's hope that this message takes hold, and soon: http://hotair.com/archives/2007/08/09/video-moderate-muslims-sing /

Why "liberal" doesn't quite fit:
"In the short term, this reflects the failure of the Republican Party to secure its hard-won victories. In the longer term, this may provide a new opportunity for the heirs to authentic liberalism - today's conservatives - as they often thrive when lovers of big government, by whatever name they go by, overreach." http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2007/08/why-liberal-doe.html

"Reality-based" Rabbi Defends Michael Vick:
http://www.debbieschlussel.com/archives/2007/08/dumb liberal lo.html

"The main proponents of 'universal coverage' want to throw more money at the current health care system, which strikes me as unwise. I believe that the 'universal coverage' mantra is dysfunctional for the same reason that 'more money for public schools' is a dysfunctional mantra for education. When your current approach is digging you into a hole, the sensible thing to do is not to dig faster. It is to stop digging." http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=080607B
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