Hi all...I think we got ourselves the happiest most playful dog in the universe ;-)
Skip loves to play so much, that I think he could go 24 hours a day and not crash. This is great and fun and all...BUT...it's hard to have people over and even go out with him...he wants to lick everyone's faces and has a very difficult time staying on the ground. He's always on a leash and I've got him to stay down for people to come to him, but as soon as they get to within a couple of feet of him, he runs and jumps at them with the most excitement you could ever see.
I've tried stepping on the leash so he won't jump, but he just strangles himself. Commands don't work very well, as he is not focused on me at all. He's not food driven, so treats (even his favorites) don't do much. The only thing I've noticed is that if I don't let him near the person and then start talking to them, after 2-3 minutes he'll relax and eventually ignores the person.
It sucks big time, because I know that he means well, and also because I'd like other people to pet him...but most get intimidated by his hyper behavior and just stay away. He's being good with a couple of kids on the street and actually sits for them, but he's known them for a while now...it's just strangers or people he sees occasionaly.

Skip is a 1 1/2 year old male pointerXborder collie..lots of fun, but needs to learn how to chill sometimes ;-)
...any suggestions? Will he lose some of this as he gets older?...after all, he used to be the same w/ me and my wife up till a couple of months ago, but has calmed down quite a bit around the house.
thanks
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Hi all...I think we got ourselves the happiest most playful dog in the universe ;-)

Great!
Skip loves to play so much, that I think he could go 24 hours a day and not crash. This is great and fun and all...BUT...[/nq]I wouldn't look for him to "calm down" but that doesn't mean his behavior will always be out of control. It depends on whether you decide to learn some timing, motivatoin and communication skills with your dog. Dogs are very phycially oriented. What you DO is far more important than what you SAY. And most people are vrey unaware of things like (1) lack of consistency and (2) when they fail to reward the behavior they want quickly enolugh for the dog to understand what is being rewarded and (3) the conflict between what their words say and what their voice and body says.

Most people think they are teaching the dog something because the person knows what they intend - they don't notice when they are sending a very different message. The most effective way to resolve this lack of awareness is to have someone call your attention to it just as you are doing it. Just exactly like the dog, your learning will go fastest if you get the right feedback at the right time - later just doesn't help vrey much.
I would say that the thing that will help your dog the most is for you to get involved in some activity in which you learn to work with and communicate with your dog. That could be agilty, or rally obedience or tricks or freestyle or even herding. Having shared goals helps you work as a team, and helps you learn to better communicate with your dog. It is also quite a bit more motivating for the human than abstract drill work. Among other things these kinds of activities will help you and your dog together develop the ability to focus and that skill spills over to daily life. And exercising your dog's mind regularly will usually reduce that kind of frantic activity that is unfocussed.
Your dog look anything like this one?
http://www.dog-play.com/tanith.html

Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com /
http://dogplay.com/Shop /