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I sure wish it was that way here in the U.S. What is even more mind boggling is that vets, who are supposed to care about the health and welfare of animals, can actually amputate the ends of a cat's toes with nary a thought.

Elsewhere on the Magical InterWeb, I stumbled upon the usual declawing arguments, when one person threw in a new variable: He/she claimed that they had their cat declawed via laser surgery; not the usual amputation using a laser, but laser surgery that actually removes only the claw.
I thought this sounded unlikely, but it seems that it may be so (http://www.laserdeclaw.com/technical.html ).
Comments?
Steve.
not the usual amputation using a laser, but laser surgery that actually removes only the claw. I thought this sounded unlikely, but it seems that it may be so (http://www.laserdeclaw.com/technical.html ).

Sounds bogus to me.
That is, the idea of "just scraping out the claw" is not* new. It has been tried before, and it was abandoned in favor of amputation, because there's *no reliable way to tell where the bone tissue "ends" and the claw tissue "begins". So, whether one scrapes with scalpels or with lasers makes no real difference: the claw will grow back out, almost invariably deformed.
Doing this with lasers is most likely just a new technique to reinvent an old problem. Give it a couple of years for the negative reports to pile up.
Of course I'm not a vet, but this sounds like crap to me. The claw is so closely adhered to the bone, that I find it impossible to believe that they could just remove the claw.

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
BTW, if anyone wants to email this "wonderful" vet, here's his information. I just sent him a nice note:
For more technical and licensing information, please contact Dr. Young directly.
Dr. William P. Young

11875 Pickerington RoadPickerington, OH 43147
Phone: 614-837-6665
Fax: 614-837-6692
Email: (Email Removed)

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
Of course I'm not a vet, but this sounds like crap to me. The claw is so closely adhered to the bone, that I find it impossible to believe thatthey could just remove the claw.

Isn't there another type of declawing that doesn't even remove the claws? I vaguely remember asking a question about it here a few years ago. Something about tendons being snipped so the claws can't extend and retract (or whatever it is they do). The cats can't "claw" at things, but the owners still have to snip their nails. Still a lousy option, but some really believe it's humane.
As an aside, someone here once mentioned removing their cats' nail sheaths from their scratching post. I've been examining my cat's scratching post, but can't find anything. Anyone know what to look for? I just wanted to see what they looked like.
rona

***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the inconvenience!***
Isn't there another type of declawing that doesn't even remove the claws? I vaguely remember asking a question about it ... things, but the owners still have to snip their nails. Still a lousy option, but some really believe it's humane.

Tendonectomy, IIRC.
And the owner better be great about clipping the claws, because the cat can no longer claw to remove the sheath. They can grow all the way around and through the pad.
I have also heard arthritis listed as a side-effect, but have no stats or anything on how common it is.
As an aside, someone here once mentioned removing their cats' nail sheaths from their scratching post. I've been examining my cat's scratching post, but can't find anything. Anyone know what to look for? I just wanted to see what they looked like.

I never find any, but I clip the kids claws, so that almost always takes the sheath with it.
The sheaths just look like dead nail bits.

~kaeli~
A plateau is a high form of flattery.
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Here's a bit of info on it:
This was in the 1997 veterinary textbook "Small Animal Surgery" by Theresa Welch Fossum, DVM, MS, PhD (Associate Professorand Chief of Surgery, Dept. of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas): Under "Deep Digital Flexor Tendonectomy", it states in part: "The deep digital flexor tendon inserts on the flexor process of the third phalanx and is needed to flex the phalanx..Hemorrhage, infection, and lameness may occur post-operatively. Tendonectomy of the superficial digital flexor (which inserts on the proximal aspect of P2 (the second phalanx) instead of the deep digital flexor results in an abnormal flat-footed stance.

Problems may include interphalangeal joint immobility, fibrosis, pain, and claw ingrowth into the digital pads. Cats may require onychectomy to relieve clinical signs.." In the section titled "Postoperative Care and Complications" of Onychectomy (Declawing)t: "Complications (i.e. pain, hemorrhage, pad damage, lameness, swelling, infection, claw regrowth, second phalanx protrusion, and palmagrade stance) occur in 50% of patients. Cutting the digital pads prolongs postoperative pain and lameness..."

Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
BTW, if anyone wants to email this "wonderful" vet, here's his information. I just sent him a nice note:

And here's a follow up question:
If this technique does do what it says on the tin (i.e., it does just remove the claw), what arguments do you think would remain against declawing? (I know my argument, but I don't think it would be generally persuasive).
Steve.
Doing this with lasers is most likely just a new technique to reinvent an old problem. Give it a couple of years for the negative reports to pile up.

I don't know whether to hope that'll be the case, or hope it'll not be so.

Steve.
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