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This was in the 1997 veterinary textbook "Small Animal Surgery" by Theresa Welch Fossum, DVM, MS, PhD (Associate Professor and ... postoperative pain and lameness..." Lauren See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm

Eek! No matter what anyone says, there's nothing humane in that at all! I should print that up and see if my local humane society will post it. Maybe getting permission from the author might be a good idea, first. My hs does not promote any form of declawing, but they don't actively deter it, either. When I got my cat they gave a little spiel about how they don't recommend declawing, and that training cats to use scratching posts is a much better idea, but they aren't aggressive enough about it. I think they should put up pictures of declaws and tendonectomies gone bad, along with highlights of studies showing the negatives. Come to think of it, I wonder if my vet would do that...
rona

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Elsewhere on the Magical InterWeb, I stumbled upon the usual declawing arguments, when one person threw in a new variable: ... actually removes only the claw. I thought this sounded unlikely, but it seems that it may be so (http://www.laserdeclaw.com/technical.html ). Comments?

Hi Steve,
This is not a new variable nor is this a new procedure removing "only the claw". The claw is a part of the distal phalanx or terminal phalanx (also called P3) which is the last toe bone. To ensure that there is no claw regrowth, either a part of the distal phalanx or the entire distal phalanx is removed (amputated/disarticulated). These are the two methods used in declawing, regardless of the cutting instrument used.
I phoned and spoke to Dr. Young (from your posted site above) who confirmed that his laser method indeed removes the entire distal phalanx. When I explained that the statements on the web site do not make this at all clear, he said he would be willing to include this information. While he stated that he does not encourage declawing, he said that he encourages owners who want to declaw to do so at the time of neutering. This just confirms, yet again, that declawing is usually not done "as a last resort" (it never is a last resort, there are always humane options) as claimed by many North American veterinarians who try to justify it, but is a common and in some clinics, sadly, a routine procedure.

Thus, even the ethical guidelines (and they are only guidelines) of the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association) and the CVMA (Canadian), which state that declawing is justifiable when the cat cannot be trained (AVMA) or when a cat risks losing a home or is facing euthanasia (CVMA), are obviously ignored by their own members.As most here know, I am absolutely opposed to elective declawing (done for other than medical necessity of the patient). It carries unnecessary risks; it is most often performed before scratching has even become a "problem" and before a kitten is given a chance to learn to use "acceptable" scratching areas; it deprives cats of a clearly pleasurable activity and of something that is so characteristic to their being and which serves numerous significant functions; it changes cats' gaits, balance, and their ability to grip and change directions suddenly when running as well as their ability to jump and grip for stability; and it is done solely for the convenience or benefit of third parties, not the patient.

There are numerous non-surgical options available, used successfully worldwide in millions of households, which include training, nail-clipping, and the provision of feline-friendly, stimulating environments.
I have researched declawing for several years and no matter how declawing is described and what method is used, elective declawing is, in my view, always an ethically and medically indefensible surgical procedure.

I hope this is helpful.
M.
They look like hollow claws. My first kitty is 3 now and the first time I spotted one on the floor I thought
'oohmygodohmygodthecatlostaclaw!!' and immediately woke her up to inspect her paws...much to her disgust!

I'm more calm about these thing now ;o)
I'll believe that when I see it. From the way his site promotes declawing, I doubt he's going to change anything, unfortunately

Good for you for calling him and thanks for posting his response.

Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
I'll believe that when I see it. From the way his site promotesdeclawing, I doubt he's going to change anything, unfortunately

It remains to be seen. There is so much on the site leading people to believe that his is an entirely different procedure than "conventional" as well as other laser declawing that I don't hold out much hope for honest clarity either.
Good for you for calling him and thanks for posting his response.

You are very welcome.
M.
"There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest".
Elie Wiesel
Elsewhere on the Magical InterWeb, I stumbled upon the usual ... but it seems that it may be so (http://www.laserdeclaw.com/technical.html ). Comments?

Hi Steve, This is not a new variable nor is this a new procedure removing "only the claw". The claw ... the web site do not make this at all clear, he said he would be willing to include this information.

Pffft! Don't hold your breath. If the guy didn't make it clear what he was doing on the website in the first place, it is highly unlikely that he will make it any more clear in the future. Vets cannot afford for the truth about declawing to become common knowledge.

-L.
That site also has a lot of very good information regarding the procedure, pain experienced by the puppies, and why ... video of a docking procedure so you can, if you wish, see for yourself how little it affects the puppies.

Just to clarify, the person bringing suit in the tail docking case is not arguing against tail docking per se. His argument is that if he shows his dog with other dogs of the same breed that have docked tails, his dog should not be penalized because its tail is not docked. He just wants the AKC to stop deducting points for dogs without docked tails. I also assume that show dogs do not do a lot of hunting in which an undocked tail could be damaged.
Just to clarify, the person bringing suit in the tail docking case is not arguing against tail docking per se. ... also assume that show dogs do not do a lot of hunting in which an undocked tail could be damaged.

It depends on the breeder some believe strongly in dual-titling their dogs (both field trials and conformation) and some actually work their dogs. Both field trials and actual work carry the risk to tails.
While I can see the desire to have a tailed dog not penalised, it could be argued that there's no way to judge a full tail on a traditionally docked breed. What should the proper tailset be? What should the tail look like? How should it be carried? There are no rules for it in the breed standard, and the only way to add them to the breed standard is for the breed club to change and ratify a new standard by putting it to a vote of all the members.
I believe that is the intent of the man who brought suit. The suit is against both the AKC and the breed club. It was the breed club lawyer who made the stupid remark: "that would be like declaring that it's cruel to declaw a cat."