My 15 year old tabby began using Tapazole a little over a year ago. He began to eat better and gained some weight.
A couple weeks ago his progress went downhill and his appetitie greatly decreased and he has been very quiet. Turns out now his kidneys are bad. The vet confirmed the Tapazole probably did the damage.

WHY THE HELL WASN'T I TOLD ABOUT THIS POSSIBILITY??

If I had known there was a danger of serious kidney problems I would have really tried to dig up the money for surgery.

Sparky is now at the vet's getting his kidney's flushed. He has to go through it again tomorrow. Next week he'll have another blood test to see how well his kidney's are working. If they can't handle the waste, the vet said the only other choice will be to kill him (the cat, not the vet).
Yeah I know there are other terms for it, but it all means the same.

If your vet suggests Tapazole, question him/her carefully about the danger of kidney failure caused by the drug.
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I'm so sorry to hear about your kitty. I would suggest at least getting a second opinion before you decide on euthanisia.
I hope your kitty gets better,
Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
My 15 year old tabby began using Tapazole a little over a year ago. He began to eat better and ... the same. If your vet suggests Tapazole, question him/her carefully about the danger of kidney failure caused by the drug.

I can understand your fear and anger, but in fact your vet was being conservative recommending the use of Tapazole - if you'd had surgery performed, your cat would probably have had kidney problems much earlier. I'm surprised that apparently the kidneys weren't being monitored though, treating hyperT can often unmask latent CRF. More info:

http://www.felinecrf.org/related diseases.htm#hyperT treatments

I'd suggest you read more of the site, there are many people who juggle CRF and hyperT successfully. I certainly wouldn't be considering euthanasia after only two days on IV - you may well need to treat Sparky at home with treatments such as sub-Qs for a while before he stabilises.

HTH
Helen
circa Mon, 22 Dec 2003 23:24:04 -00, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav, Helen (Email Removed) said,
I certainly wouldn't be considering euthanasia after only two days on IV - you may well need to treat Sparky at home with treatments such as sub-Qs for a while before he stabilises.

I'll second this. My 15.5 year-old, Jacob, was first diagnosed with CRF two years ago. He's not hyper-t yet, but his thyroid values have climbed over the past couple of years, so it's on the horizon.

Jacob gets 100ml of Ringer's Lactate every night, and both his behavior and his bloodwork indicate that he he is nowhere near the point where I'd consider euthanasia. In fact, he's still referred to as being in renal "insufficiency" as opposed to "failure". As soon as the signs showed up, he was switched to K/D, and he only recently began fluid therapy.
While CRF is* fatal if something else doesn't kill the cat first, it's not necessarily *immediately fatal. Get a second opinion as far as the euthanasia.
Laura

I am Dyslexia of Borg,
Your ass will be laminated.
I certainly wouldn't be considering euthanasia after only two days ... treatments such as sub-Qs for a while before he stabilises.

I'll second this. My 15.5 year-old, Jacob, was first diagnosed with CRF two years ago. He's not hyper-t yet, but ... doesn't kill the cat first, it's not necessarily immediately fatal. Get a second opinion as far as the euthanasia. Laura

Right; I third this. It sounds to me - from the OP's post - that perhaps Sparky is in a renal failure "crash", but he may well pull out of it after his system's been flushed. And he may be able to do quite well for a considerable time on sub-Q treatments at home, perhaps along w/ any other recommended diet &/or treatment. If he pulls through this phase, & sub cutaneous fluids are then recommended at "x" intervals, the vet can show you how to give them at home. It's easier than you may think.

I also second what Helen said, re: the Tapazole/methimazole. It's a conservative & standard treatment (incl. for humans - I take it for hyperthyroidism) - Vs. surgery or radioactive treatment, & if anything - AFAIK, it's usually the liver one has to sort of watch out for - esp. when the med is first started, for possible adverse effects. I don't think the vet was being negligent - Tapazole's usually the first choice of treatment, even if the other treatments are later considered.

Cathy

"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
>

I'm sorry about your kitty but agree that he very possibly will improve and live much longer. My cat is 17.5 and has been on tapazole for 1.5 years and also has mild CRF. He was diagnosed with that before the hyper-t and, in fact, once he was diagnosed with hyper-t and put on tapazole, he improved dramatically. I knew hyper-t can mask kidney disease but I never heard that tapazole causes kidney damage. Is that correct?
Candace
(take the litter out before replying by e-mail)
See my cats:

"One does not meet oneself until one catches the reflection from an eye other than human." (Loren Eisely)
My 15 year old tabby began using Tapazole a little over a year ago. He began to eat better and ... are bad. The vet confirmed the Tapazole probably did the damage. WHY THE HELL WASN'T I TOLD ABOUT THIS POSSIBILITY??

Because it doesn't exist. You probably misunderstood what you were told. Tapazole does'nt cause kidney problems but hyperthyroidism masks them in part by accellerating kidney function. With some cats, completely controlling the hyperthyrodism causes the problem with degreaded renal function to become a bigger problem.
If I had known there was a danger of serious kidney problems I would have really tried to dig up the money for surgery.

Wouldn't have helped his kidney problems. Might have made it harder to control them. Cats with both CRF and hyperthyroidism are caught between a rock and a hard place-treating both is often a balancing act.
Sparky is now at the vet's getting his kidney's flushed. He has to go through it again tomorrow. Next week ... the same. If your vet suggests Tapazole, question him/her carefully about the danger of kidney failure caused by the drug.

Completely unnecessary. Quesion him instead about the possibility of CRF (which any decent vet would know to investigate) and how to best control both conditions if the cat has both.
circa Mon, 22 Dec 2003 21:28:33 -0500, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav, Cathy Friedmann (Email Removed) said,
It sounds to me - from the OP's post - that perhaps Sparky is in a renal failure "crash", but ... at "x" intervals, the vet can show you how to give them at home. It's easier than you may think.[/nq]Definitely! The first time I tried to do Jacob's fluids, it didn't go particularly well because I made such a big deal out of it. Now it's a nightly ritual that Jacob wants. If he feels like it's time for his fluids, he goes to the spot where he gets them and stares pointedly at me until I go get a needle out of the freezer and hook up the line. All I have to do is start lightly picking up the fur on the back of his neck and he knows I'm getting ready to make the "tent" that the needle goes into.

He immediately lies down and starts purring, and as soon as the fluids are in, he starts snacking on the kibble I put down in front of him. I can't get over how docile he is with the fluid administration, and it's clear that it makes him feel better. Once you get past the fear of "hurting" your cat by sticking him with a needle, the entire experience can be very calm and even pleasant.
Most important, it can significantly lengthen the amount of quality time your cat has. The veterinarian who prescribed Jacob's fluids said that they have found that they have the most success with cats who get daily fluids, even if it's just a small amount like Jacob gets. When the cat gets daily fluids, s/he doesn't go through that roller-coaster of dehydration/rehydration, instead maintaining hydration at a relatively steady rate, which is much easier on the cat's body.
A crash doesn't necessarily mean that it's the end of the line- in fact, AIUI, most CRF cats crash at some point. I've been lucky in that Jacob's CRF was caught very early and we've been very proactive in his treatment.
Laura

I am Dyslexia of Borg,
Your ass will be laminated.
The first time I tried to do Jacob's fluids, it didn't go particularly well because I made such a big deal out of it. Now it's a nightly ritual that Jacob wants.

That's great. I never got to that point with Scruffy. He plays half hearted avoidance games at "that time of night", and of late he has started fidgeting during the fluids, I'm not sure why. But there's no question that he likes the feeling afterwards - hes' almost beatific in his mellowness Emotion: smile
Once you get past the fear of "hurting" your cat by sticking him with a needle, the entire experience can be very calm and even pleasant.

Definitely. I like the idea of giving him fluids, and I think he picks that up.
A crash doesn't necessarily mean that it's the end of the line- in fact, AIUI, most CRF cats crash at some point.

And, as I understand it, more than once. When Scruffy crashed in February, he was in for 4 days of IV. About two months ago, there were some early warning signs, but he pulled through without mishap, tough customer that he is. Still, I expect that he'll crash again at some point, and it'll be another round of IV fluids at the vets.

A lot of this is human mental preparation. Your CRF cat will crash, and the odds are that this will happen more than once. Just keep your head, and once you've had the satisfaction - enormous for me - of seeing your cat pull through, you'll realize that it will take an awful lot to finally claim your cat. Until that dread time, keep on truckin'.
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