I have just finished very nicely renovating my dad's house and renting it. The woman I rented it to is a single mom, first time she has ever had to work outside of the home. She has three kids, girls. 16yo, 11 and a 4 yo. I didn't know it at rental time, but the 16yo homeschools, so is home all day "studying". When asked about pets, trying to open minded..(and the property has a smallish fenced in yard) I said a dog would be fine. No dogs that were just outside dogs, but a dog that was like part of the family was ok.

I figured that would semi qualify the better owners. Well, because of some heater problems, I was able to spend a couple of impromptu days at the location. Here's the deal. Part 1. They have a Lab mix that they adopted...She is big, and has no manners and they are not attempting to teach her any. She's a sweet enough dog, but jumps, digs, jumps up at the windows (I'm hoping she doesn't tear screens.) They adopted her from the local SPCA so she is spayed.

She has been banished to the outside, because she is so rowdy.Part 2. They have a 9 week old male Sheltie. He is cute as can be. But there is absolutely no effective housetraining. The little guy runs down the hall, to the rug and pees and then scampers off. The rugs are theirs. The house floors are a good quality vinyl...so I figured in my earlier permission for a house dog, that an occasional accident wouldn't be a tragedy. The 16 yo who is home all day "studying" is actually watching Jerry Springer, staying on the phone, and while I was there, I'm pretty sure I thwarted a visit from some eager teenage boys.

Clueless as to paying attention to the little Sheltie. As he gets older, I am certain he will be typical and begin to mark...even though the floors are vinyl, I'd rather not have him pee all over baseboards, etc.
I don't know if I actually gave permission to have two dogs...but I did stipulate that the dogs had to be well cared for and attended to. Well, there are two dogs and they are virtually not attended to. In fact, both days while I was there, I looked and there was no water for either dog, inside or out. I gave them some of course.
I am wondering how I should approach telling them that after observing them, that I have decided ONE dog is the limit and that dog must be spayed/neutered and well house trained. The little sheltie likes to chew wood, too and the breakfast bar seems to be handy for chewing. And is it my place to pick which dog. Right now, neither are suitable and not the dogs fault. I don't think, because of their lack of paying attention, that any dog will be suitable.
Other instances of the tenant fudging on what the original agreements are. So I am not really trusting her. The rent checks are good and on time...big deal, I can rent the house easily enough to someone else, the dog thing has me bugged. What would you do?
Perry
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I have just finished very nicely renovating my dad's house and renting it. The woman I rented it to is ... I can rent the house easily enough to someone else, the dog thing has me bugged. What would you do?

that's a difficult situation. what other types of fudging have there been? you should check your local tenant-landlord laws to find out what your (and their) rights are. did you specify that they could have pets on the lease? did you specify how many? i don't think you have the legal right to tell them they have to get rid of a pet if you didn't already specify "one dog only" on the lease. i also don't think you have the legal right to tell them how to care for their dogs (unfortunately). again, you'll have to check your local regulations for this stuff, as it can vary widely by region.
the only thing i can think of, is if you really believe the dogs are being neglected, you can call the ASPCA or Humane Society to investigate. but i don't think you can just tell them to get rid of a dog and expect them to comply. i know i wouldn't.
-kelly
I can rent the house easily enough to someone else, the dog thing has
me bugged. What would you do?

I would forget trying to be reasonable in their eyes and go for being reasonable in my own. Tell them that you've changed your mind about allowing dogs and that you'll take care of rehoming the current ones. Stand firm. These people have such vastly different ideas of what taking care of a dog means and what taking care of a rental property means that there's no sense in trying to straighten out the little misunderstanding. That's only asking for trouble. Put an end to the nonsense now.
Is it legal in your state for a 16 year old to drop out of highschool? If it isn't, alert the proper state authorities as to the situation. Wait, you're in Louisiana, right? Nevermind.
Lia
I'd kindly remind her of the initial agreement of one dog that was not outside-only and tell her that she's not keeping her end of the bargain. Tell her the Lab needs training, as does any dog, give her some ideas on how to go about training (or getting help) and ask, point blank, if she intends to work with the dog & bring him back inside. If she says no or gives a bunch of excuses then suggest she take the dog back to the shelter.

Bring the conversation around to the Sheltie then and point out that he's going to begin marking very soon and that even if they get him housetrained, he's still likely to mark the furniture, walls & baseboard. Tell her he's been chewing the woodwork and that while you understand puppies can be destructive you need a guarantee that they will supervise & train him so that the house & its woodwork doesn't suffer.
It'll be awkward getting the conversation started but I think it can be done in a civil and polite manner while still being effective. How she responds to your opinions will give you better insight into whether she's going to ignore you and be a problem or listen to you and try to fix things.
Tara
I would forget trying to be reasonable in their eyes and go for being reasonable in my own.

And why can't both be achieved?
Tell them that you've changed your mind about allowing dogs and that you'll take care of rehoming the current ones. Stand firm.

Maybe Perry doesn't want to take on the responsibility of finding homes for two totally untrained, one not even housebroken or altered, one with no history dogs. Maybe she wouldn't mind but what resources does she have for finding these dogs good, permanent homes?
These people have such vastly different ideas of what taking care of a dog means and what taking care of ... in trying to straighten out the little misunderstanding. That's only asking for trouble. Put an end to the nonsense now.

Lia don't you think you are jumping to conclusions and overreacting? Do you know what its like to be a single parent and move into a new place with 3 kids, juggle your time, your work & your parent responsibilities? Its not impossible to be a good pet owner as well but this lady may just be going through an adjustment period. It doesn't make her a terrible pet owner yet because I don't think she's had enough time to get all her ducks in a row. She may be perfectly willing & intending to train the Lab and the Sheltie. She may be giving the 16yo time to prove that she can do it as it may have been a 'condition' of getting a dog. I don't think there was enough information to say for sure.
Is it legal in your state for a 16 year old to drop out of highschool? If it isn't, alert the proper state authorities as to the situation.

Wow, aren't you the moral police.

Tara
Well, in this situation, I can change anything I want as often as I want. Our agreement is a month to month rental agreement. It is in the landlord's best interest to have such. In leases*, the tenant has the upper hand. *Month to month gives the power to the landlord. I have had enough rentals and tenants to know how to cover my *** for changes. Send registered letters. In court, the judges love 'em, because I have already started the ball rolling.

I can have someone out of a house and on the street (or change the rules) in short order. I've done it, and it ain't pretty. I'm just wondering how to call this whole dog thing. In two months 1. the dog situation 2. tenants have taken over garage which was declared off limits (it's my storage) 3. burned a hole in bathroom floor with curling iron. 4. broken a drawer in kitchen. (newly remodeled) Plus some other things that just have my spidey sense going off.

This woman is newly single and I think she has bitten off more than she can chew.
Perry
Well, in this situation, I can change anything I want as often as I want. Our agreement is a month ... sense going off. This woman is newly single and I think she has bitten off more than she can chew.

wow. in my state, once you've established residence, it can take up to six months for an eviction to go through, even on a month to month!

i'd cut them loose for the damage and the intrusion to your garage and just be rid of them. i think that telling them how to raise their dogs might *** them off, and you don't want them to retaliate by trashing the place more.
-kelly
Well, in this situation, I can change anything I want as often as I want. Our agreement is a month ... sense going off. This woman is newly single and I think she has bitten off more than she can chew.

Layout the ground rules again for her then...if you are willing to give her the benefit of doubt. Tell her, point blank, the garage is OFF LIMITS and put a deadbolt on the door(s) to prove your point. Raise the physical damage issue to include the puppy chewing.
As you said, she may have just bitten off more than she can chew, and who knows what kind of trouble the 16yo got into to warrant homeschooling (if she's not doing it with the other kids then its probable that she didn't choose to homeschool).

Tara
Is it legal in your state for a 16 year old to drop out of highschool?

a: homeschooling is not "dropping out of highschool". b: yes, if the parent signs the paperwork, it's legal in most states. i dropped out at 17 with no problems whatsoever.
-kelly
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