1 2 3 4 5 6
You didn't see any humor in the way she told her story?

I'm not Mary, but I'm pretty sure "Let's be funny" wasn't her point.
I can take my dog any place too and do. I take here everywhere and she never gets into a fight.

I'm pretty sure that wasn't her point, either.
Is your dog dog-aggressive? One of the subjects Mary addressed is giving dog-aggressive dogs the skills they need to co-exist in polite dog society.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
When a Cabbage Patch baby dies, I think we all feel the pain. Melora Creager
I seem to notice that Muttley is being more aggressive (or assertive) with me lately, and he is almost starting ... unease about this whole situation. It's a done deal. I will be saddened but relieved when it is finally over.

I will be saddened and relieved as well Paul. One thing that is certainly not uncommon, is a dog who has had no rules for "x" amount of their life, is suddenly being given rules that they need to abide by, and balks at that. Heck, I know human beings who have been lont-time colleges/grad students who suddenly have to go to work at a specific time and balk at that too!
Canines are not alone in the "what? you are suddenly telling me what to do and when to do it? I liked it when *I* ran my life better".

Not to Paul necessarily, but a general comment -
My application has some very basic questions, what they hope to accomplish, etc, but week 1 (before dogs) we have a 3 page questionnaire as well. I will be tweaking both after this incident - never too much information as far as I'm concerned, but I hate bogging people down with a ton of paperwork either.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
No but it was your point; that is why I mentioned that I could also take my dog anywhere and not worry about her. Actually, she would make a great service dog visiting hospitals and elderly homes. When walking her in the forest, she is off leash and plays with all the other dogs. That is why I stated that I believe a training class causes tension among the dogs; I should have said mostly the newer untrained dogs.
My dog is not dog aggressive at all, but I am surprised that yours is. I thought you owned a boxer. Mary told her story in a very humorous manner, and I agree with everything she said; and that is how I believe a lot of dogs act when first beginning training classes. I think it is nice when someone is able to inject some humor into their message.
Well that was pretty stoopid of her.==

Well, no, he is a very experienced trainer; not crappy at all. As mentioned one time before, he trains search and rescue dog, dogs for police service and dogs for obedience and schutzhund. I don't understand why without knowing him, you would judge him as crappy.I am not arguing against training classes; I am for them. I am just stating the situation as I noticed it when new dogs join the group with no training at all. The dogs that had been in the class for a few weeks and some for months; were very well behaved off and on leash. Some of them had been on their second phase of lessons. And, yes my dog was rather stressed, overstimulated, bored and distracted. This was the first time she had ever gone to a training class.

I don't think she liked it. We are talking about a dog that when I first got her did not know how to get into a car; when I turned on the TV for the first time, she freaked out, because she never saw a TV. We had to teach her how to go up and down stairs. She was a rescue dog with no experience. Your dogs probably like it because it is a social thing for them. I am sure most dogs like it after awhile. My dog has grown and matured; she is four years old now.

Rottweilers don't mature until age 4 or 5.
No but it was your point;

No, it wasn't.
that is why I mentioned that I could also take my dog anywhere and not worry about her.

Your point has nothing at all to do with anything Mary wrote, nor anything else that has been posted to this thread. The thread is specifically about identifying dog aggressive animals before admitting them to group classes. Tangentially, the subject of dog aggressive dogs existing in polite canine society came up (something you apparently think is "really funny"). Unless your dog is dog aggressive, your post makes absolutely no sense in this context.
Actually, she would make a great service dog visiting hospitals and elderly homes.

That's great. Mine would not.
When walking her in the forest, she is off leash and plays with all the other dogs.

So you really have no point in posting about your dog in this thread, period.
That is why I stated that I believe a training class causes tension among the dogs; I should have said mostly the newer untrained dogs.

Again, what is your point? No one said it didn't cause stress.
My dog is not dog aggressive at all, but I am surprised that yours is. I thought you owned a boxer.

Why are you surprised? Anyone who knows anything at all about Boxers would not be surprised that many of them are dog aggressive. They come from the same basic foundation stock as Pit Bulls.
Mary told her story in a very humorous manner, and I agree with everything she said; and that is how ... first beginning training classes. I think it is nice when someone is able to inject some humor into their message.

There may be humor there, but I don't see anything in Mary's post that is "really funny."

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.
A.A. Milne
I hate bogging people down with a ton of paperwork either.

I think it might make a difference whether the paperwork is for a class that is for puppies only or older dogs, or a mixture of the two.
The Khan who went to class was always so distracted, so worried, so concerned about getting to sniff every dog, at the same time getting >away

from every human there.

When Brenin first started going to agility class, he was very worried and tense about many of the other dogs, as well as about some of the people who came and went outside the fence.
Over the next few months, he learned that he didn't need to worry.

And even when other dogs behaved in extremely rude and clueless fashion - hey, it's beginner class, stuff happens - the worst he ever did was snarl and give a warning snap. Not to mention that when said rude and clueless was a puppy, he growled but turned his head away and got up in avoidance.

I have seen occasional scuffles start in various classes (agility and obedience) over the years - stuff happens. I've never seen serious harm done.
The only serious bite I've seen was a PWD that made a completely unprovoked bite to a human walking by; that dog had a history of several previous attempts and at least one other bite, and was put down within the week. He was just plain unstable, btw, not a rescue or with any sort of unusual history.
His owner's other PWDs are perfectly normal, and have never exhibited any aggression issues, incidentally.
Getting back to the original subject, I agree that it's probably wise to ask potential students if their dog has ever bitten or tried to bite, and get a history if the answer is yes; but we all know that people will lie or bend the truth about such matters.
When walking her in the forest, she is off leash and plays with all the other dogs.

After you've checked with the other dogs' owner(s) and gotten permission, yes? It's only polite.
I thought you owned a boxer.

Why are you surprised? Anyone who knows anything at all about Boxers would not be surprised that many of them are dog aggressive. They come from the same basic foundation stock as Pit Bulls.

I've got two adolescent boy-Boxers in class now. The brindle is very bouncy, very loud (whining, screaming, barking) because he wants to interact with the other dogs. The owner says he wants to play, and mostly that seems to be true. He's rumbled at the other Boxer. The fawn dog has decided Ranger Must Die, he's thinking that maybe the first Boxer needs a smackdown, and his owner is about to expire of embarassment. Both are what I'd consider to be "typical" Boxers great with people, mostly fine with girldogs, pondering world domination around boydogs.
And that's what the fawn Boxer's problem is. Ranger's male. The other Boxer is male. There's a male Dachsie in class, but the other seven class dogs are female. Gee, take a wild guess who the boyBoxer is going to get all bent about? He ignores the Dachsie, but the two boys who are about his size and confidence level? Game on.
Getting back to the original subject, I agree that it's probably wise to ask potential students if their dog has ... if the answer is yes; but we all know that people will lie or bend the truth about such matters.

The first night of class I ask that people tell me if their dog has a problem with people or dogs. (I don't define "problem", sometimes people will own to a problem if it isn't labelled aggression.) It's a safety thing, plus it helps to know which dogs need extra attention or assistance.
Show more